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Full text of "The Connecticut magazine"

ALLEN, COUNTY PUBLIC LIBRARY 



3 1833 01738 8908 



GENEALOGY 
974.6 
C:7698A 
1900 



Digitized by the Internet Archive 
in 2013 



http://archive.org/details/connecticutmagazv6hart 



THE 

Connecticut magazine. 



AN ILLUSTRATED BI-MONTHLY, 



Devoted to Connecticut in its Various Phases of History, Litera- 
ture, Picturesque Features, Science, Art 
and Industry^ 



VOL. VL 



JANUARY TO DECEMBER, i900. 



HARTFORD, CONN. 



Copyrighted 

and 

Published by The Connecticut Magazine Co.* 

Hartford, Conn. 



CONTENTS OF VOLUME VI, 



JANUARY-DECEMBER, ^"^^^(^f^f^.l" /Ifl 

Barnard, Henry. (Portrait.) 

Berlin : A Sketch, Illustrated. TAe Rev. Magee Pratt 

Burr, Hon. Alfred E. (Portrait.) . . ... . . . . . . 

Bushnell Park after an Ice Storm, In. Illustrated 

Butler, Colonel Zebulon. Anna Conynqham Stevens Krumbhaar. . . . . 

Cheney, Ivieut. Ward. Thomas Snell Weaver ....... 

Cincinnati, The Venerable and Illustrious Order of the. Illustrated. 

The Rev A. N. Lewis, M. A. 
Connecticut at the Paris Exposition, Elizabeth Gertrude Daniel. .... 
Connecticut Children's Aid Society, The. Illustrated. George H. Warner. 
First Sacrifice of the Revolution, The. Illustrated. 

Charlotte Molyneaux Holloway. 
Frontispieces. New Britain Institute Ivibrary Building. ..... 

Percival, James Gates. (Portrait.) 

Rock Rimon. Seymour. .........".. 

" Thaddeus, Do You Remember These ? " Glebe House. Illustrated by 

Sarah E. Francis. 

"The Old Oranaug Inn Stood Hard by the Road." 

Warner, Charles Dudley. (Portrait.) 

Windsor Center showing Town Hall and Post Office. 

Glebe House, The. (Serial Story ) Illustrated. .' . . 33. 93. i53 

Chauncey C. Hotchkiss. 
Godard, George S. , State Librarian. H. Phelps Arms. .... 

Golf Clubs in Connecticut. Illustrated. W. D. Freer. .... 

Governor Talcott's Mansion and the City of Hartford's Claim. Illustrated 

John R. Campbell. 
Hartford's Empty Reservoirs. lUUvStrated. H. Phelps Arms 
Hartford to New London; Forty five Miles. Illustrated. W. H. C. Pynchon 
Hecker, Miss Genevieve. (Portrait.) .... 
Historical Notes and Correspondence. The Editor. 

Hoadly, Charles J. (Portrait.) 

Hooker, Thomas. Alice Porter. 

Huntington, Samuel Illustrated. Susan D. Huntington. 
Kensington. Illustrated. The Rev. Arthur J. Benedict. . 
Marcy, Captain Reuben. Illustrated. Thomas Knowlton Marcy. 
Morris, Commodore. An Old Time Hero. Ellen D. Lamed 

New Britain. Illustrated.. 

Old Landsmarks of Seymour. Illustrated. Rev. ILallis A. Campbell 

Old Windsor. Illustrated. Charles Franklin Olin 

Percival, James Gates. Illustrated. (First paper.) The Rev. Magee Pratt. 

Percival, James Gates. Illustrated. The Rev C. A. Wight 

Problem of Domestic Servitude. Rev. Magee Pratt. 

Putnam Phalanx, Historical Sketch of The. Illustrated. Emory B. Giddings. 

Phelps, Hon. James Thomas D. Coulter. ..... 

Reed, John, — 1633-1730. Illustrated. Charles E. Benton. 
Robinson, Hon. Henry C W. LI. C. Pynchon .... 

Rockville, The City of. Illustrated. B. Lewellyn Bnrr. 

SchoU House, The Nathan Hale, in East Haddam. Illustrated. 

Francis 
Seymour, The Town of. Illustrated. Frank G. Bassett. 
Southington, Glimpses of. Past and Present. Illustrated. Elisha R. 

Sperry, Miss Ruth Thompson. Mary S. Ludlow 

Stamford, 1641-1900. Illustrated. Julie Adam Pozvell. . 

Unknown Southern Seas, In. Charles Curtiz Hahn. 

Visit to the Old Homestead of Oliver Ellsworth,'A. Illustrated. 

Mrs Washington Irving VinaL 
Warner, Charles Dudley. LLon. Joseph R. Hawley. . 



H. Parker 



Vezvell. 



362 

167 

45 

524 

143 

lOI 

416 

363.431 
514 
224 

124 

60 

310 

208 

3 

392 

456 

237. 348 

522 

255 
359 

25 

75 
254 
439 
438 
355 
247 

393 
20 

411 
125 
491 
457 
81 

87 
4S9 

335 
178 

17 
177 



243 
311 
3 
164 
209 
475 



4S4 
42S 



POETRY. 

Ambition. Frank Burnham Bagley 523 

As the Goodly Ships Go By. Henry Rutgers Remsen 430 

Because of You. Claribel Egbert. 175 

Called Back. A. H. T. Fisher. iSo 

Carol. Elizabeth Alden Curtis. ........... 132 

Christmas. Genevieve Hale Whitlock. .......... 481 



GENEALOGICAL INDEX. 

Dawn . Florence Folsom . ^ .......... : ^i, 

Dreamer, The. Charles J. Girelius. . . . . . . . . . 445 

Evening of Life. J/. Phelps Arms. .......... 85 

Fame. Burton Langtry Collins . . ....... . _ , 334 

Harvest Moon, The. Herbert Randall ......... 347 

Hale, Nathan. Genevieve Hale Whitlock ......... 285 

Love and the Leaf yane Martin 410 

May. Sally Porter Law. . . . . . . ... . . . 242 

Mizpah. A. H. T. Fisher 521 

Song of Action. W. Harry Cle7?ions. ......... 185 

Song of the Harbor Boats. Henry Rutgers Ref?isen 32 

The Sylvan Singer. Burton L. Collins. 437 

St. Valentine. Elizabeth Alden Curtis. . . . . . , . . gg 

To a Sunbeam. Margherita Arlina Hamm. . . ... . .> , 284 

Vision, A. John Hotoard. ............ 24 

Winter, To. Horace D. Byrnes. ........... 49 

DEPARTMENTS. 

Book Notes and Reviews, 122,304,381,452,544 

Colleges, Our 46, 105, 181 

Current Events, 291, 365 

Editorial Notes, 54. 116, 193, 300, 377, 448, 538 

Floriculture, 199, 297, 374, 442, 532 

Genealogical Department, . . . . . . 57, 114, 190, 288, 371, 416, 535 

Historical Notes and Correspondence, . . . . 110,186,286,369,439,528 

Home, The 50, 102, 202, 306, 383 

Notes from State Societies, . . 526 

Publishers' Notes, . 123, 390, 547 



GENEALOGICAL INDEX. NOTES AND QUERIES. VOL. V: 



Ackley, Deborah 536 
Alden, Hannah 191 

Joseph 191 

Mary 191 
Allen, Abigail 190 

Anna 536 

John 190 

Samuel 190 
Ailing, John 536 

Roger 536 
Andrews, James F. G. 190 

Arnold, Elizabeth 57 
Enoch 115 
Hannah 57 
Henry 57 
John 57, 115 
John 115 
Jonothan 115 
Joseph 115 
Josiah 1 15 
Mabel 57 
Martha 57 
Mary 57 
Samuel 115 
Thankful 57 
Timothy 57 
William 115 

Averill. Abigail 191 
Avery, Col. Ebenezer 58 



Bancroft, Abner 58 

Hannah 58 
Barnard, Sarah 447 
Barnes, Richard 191 
Barns, Anna 190 
Barrel, — ; — 115 
Bartholomew, Hannah 290 
Beach, Sarah 536 
Belden, Mary 191, 289 

Bell, Benjamin 372 
Jonathan 372 
Margaret 372 
Polly 372 
Sylvester 372 
Talitha 372 

Benton, Dr. Allen 536 
Isaac 536 

Bidwell, Elizabeth 57 
Bird well, Mary 190 
Boardman, Hannah 536 
Bolles, Joseph 289, 372 
Botsford, Mary 371 
Bradley, Aaron 373 
Bronson, Deacon Isaac, 536 

Brown, Abigail 191 
Abraham 191 



Brown, Benjamin 191 
Edmund 191 
Elisha 191 
Isabel 58 
James 191 
Lydia 371 
Peter 58 
Stephen 191 

Bulkeley, Dorothy 372 
Bulkley, Rev. Peter 372 
Burr, Anna 191 

Bushnell, Francis 446 
Sarah 446 

Butler, Daniel 290 
Henry 290 
Mary 290 
William 290 

Camp, Eleazer 191, 371 
Mary 191 

Carey, Eliezer 58 
Lydia 58 

Carrington, John 535 

Carter, Nathan 373 
Robert 373, 446 

Cary, Deacon Eleazer 190 
John 190 
Lydia 190 



GENEALOGICAL INDEX, 



Case, Emeline 190 

Emily 190 

Flora Melissa 115 

Jacob 190 

Juliette E 190 

Lucia D. 190 

Mary Ann 190 

Sarah Ann 190 

Susan M. 190 

Theodore D. 190 
Chapman Mary 191, 289 

Samuel 289 

Sarah 289 
Clapp, Emma 290 

George 290 

Jane 290 

Capt. John 290 

Mabel 290 

Rhoda 290 

Russell 290 
Clark, Israel 536 
Clinton, Elizabeth 192 

Henry 192 

Margaret 192 

Mary 192 

Mercy 192 

Shubael 192 
Clough, Col. S. DeWitt 372 
Cole, Jesse 115 
Coleman, Thomas 535 
Coley, Abigail 114 

David 114 
Collier, Susanna 536 
Colton, George 58 
Comstock, Mary 191, 289 

Samuel 289 

Sarah 289 
Cook, Ambrose 536 

Hezekiah 192 
Corey, Elizabeth 289, 372 
Cowles, Abijah 447 

Timothy 447 
Crane, Silas 191 
Crow, John 372 
Cudaback, Lydia 289 
Curtis, Eleazor 58 
Dickinson, Jonathan 536 

Obadiah 58 

William 536 
Dix, Deborah 190 

Elizabeth 191 

Hannah 191 

John 190, 191 

Leonard 190 

Mercy 191 

Samuel 191 

William 190 

Doolittle, Moses 192, 2 8 
Douglas, William 58 
Dye, Daniel 58 

Peter 58 
Edson, Timothy 191, 192 

Ensign, 289 

Flint, Samuel 447 



Foote, David 290 

Foster, Abraham 57 
Christopher 57 
Hannah 57 
John 57 

Francis, Fanny 192 

Frary, John 114 
Mary 114 
Prudence 114 
Sampson 114 

French, Samuel 191 
Gardner, Deborah 58 
Garlic, Anna 372 
Gates, Persis 535 

Gilbert, Elizabeth 447 
Hannah Bradford 289 
Jonathan 447, 535 
Lydia 289, 371 
Mary 535 
Matthew 447 
Nathaniel 447 
Samuel 447 
Sarah 447 
Stephen 447 
William 371 

Gillett, Benjamin 372 
Eliphalet 372 
Mary 372 
William 372 

Goodhue, Elizabeth 57 

Goodsell, Dan 290 
Isaac 290 
Dr. Penfield 290 
Samuel 290 
Thomas 290 

Gould, William 58 

Gridley, Elnathan 58 
Hannah 58 
Sarah 58 

Griswold, Adaline 289 
Adelia 289 
Benjamin 289 
Evaline 289 
Horatio 289 
La Fayette 289 
Mercy 191 
Samuel 191 
Socrates, 289 

Hale, Curtis 191 
Elisha 191 
Eunice 191 
F'reelove 191 
Mary 58 
Phebe 191 
Samuel 191 
Sylvia 191 

Hall, Mary 447 
Hanford, Thomas 289 
Hawkins, Anthony 58 
Hickok, Rachael 290 
Hill, Daniel 191 
Hills, Ruth 192 



Hinsdale, Isaac 447 

Jonathan 447 

Lydia 447 
Hitchcock, Ann 115 
Holbrook, Daniel 115 
Hoi comb, Cynthia 115 
Hotchkiss, Willis 289, 372 
Howe, John C. 190 
Hull, Lydia 535 



Hunn, Deborah 



535 



Hyatt, Deborah 372 
Ebenezer 373 
Elizabeth 373 
Hezekiah 372 
John 372, 373 
Margaret 372 
Mary St. John 373 
Thomas 373 

Ingham, Abigail 371, 446 
Benjamin 289, 371. 446 
Ebenezer 446 
Joseph 371, 446 
Mehitabel, 536 

Ingraham, Elizabeth 290 
Isaac 290 
Mary 290 
Sybil 290 

Johnson, Experience 536 

Hannah 289 
Jones, Nathan 57 

Mary 289 
Judson, Mary 290 
Kennedy, John 190 
Kimball, Mary Ann 372 
Kirkland, W^illiam 289 
Kirtland, Capt John 371 

Lieut. John 3-1 

Temperance 371 
Latham Hannah 28S 

Lucy 2«8 

W^illiam 288 
Lestor, Daniel 57 
Lord, Richard 372 

Thomas 372 
Lynde, Sarah 535 
Mason, Jenks 289, 372 
Matson, Asa 115 

Newell 115 

William, 115 

Merwin, Miles 57 
Thomas 57 

Montague, Sally H. 190 
Mullens. William 446 
Neal, Noah 536 
Nichols, Abigail 191 

Gideon 191 
North, John 289 

Orcutt INIary 192 

Solomon 192 

Susanna 192 
Pardee, Silas 536 



GENEALOGICAL INDEX. 



Parker, Dorothy 58, 114 

Hannah 114 

Joseph 114, 371 

Lydia 371 

Margery 114, 371 

Ruth 114 

William 114 

Deacon William 371 
Peck, Abel 536 

Esther 536 

Stephen 536 

Penfield, Elizabeth 190 
Perry, Elizabeth 191 
Phelps, Benjamin 57 
Potter, David 447 
Prince, William 114 
Prindle, Samuel 58 
Proctor, Sarah 58 

Rice, Adonijah 535 
Seth 535 

Richardson, Lydia 192 
Ruth 192 

Ripley, David 58, 190 

Risley, John 57 

Robinson, Elias 192 

Rogers, Ananias 290 

Augustin 290 

John 290 

Piatt 290 

Richard 290 
Saxton, Ebenezer 536 

Jerusha 536 



Sewell, 115 

Skinner, Benjamin 447 

Elias 447 

Mary 58 
Sloper, Robert 536 

Smith, Anna 191 

Elizabeth 289, 537 
Martha 447 • 
Philip 57 
Solomon 191 

Spalding, Anna 57 

Philip 57 
Squires, Mary 373 
Stannard, Julia 190 
Stacy, Isaac 191 

Stevens, Abel 114 
Eliphalet 192 
John Squire 447 
Levi 114 
Parker 114 
Thomas 58, 114 

Stilson, Joseph 192 
St. John, Matthew 373 
Stoddard, Dr. James 290 

Stone, Dorothy 371, 446 
Thomas 446 

Swift, Chipman 58 

Talcott, John 191 

Tibbils, Newton 289 

Trowbridge, James 191, 289 

John 191, 289 
Tuttle, Amos G. 190 



Tyler, Bethia 58 

David 290 

William 58 

Tynes, 373. 

Wadsworth, Whitney 19c 
Wallace, James 373 

Margaret 373 
Warren, Abigail 372 

Christopher 372 

Elizabeth 372 

Jo^n 372 

Joseph 372 

Nathaniel 372 

Richard 372 
Watrous, Ambrose 290 
Watson, John 58 
Weeden, Esther 536 
Weeks, William 190 
Welles, Frances 447, 535 

Hugh 447 

James 290 

John 535 

Mary 447, 535 

Thomas 535 
West, Luke S. 190 
Wheaton, James 447 

Jehiel 448 
White, George 372 
Whiting, Elvira 190 
Williams, Judah 58 

Priscilla 57 
Wood, Lillis 290 
Woodworth, Abner 447 

Anna 447 

Hannah 447 



Serial Story THE GLEBE HOUSE 

By Chauncey C. Hotchkiss. 



ff 



Vol. VI. 



January, 1900. 



No. I. 



THE 



CONNECTICUT 
MAG A 




AN ILLVSTRATED 
iTVONTHIY 



IN THIS NUMBER. 




A 



^W ^W tfi^ 

Glimpses of Southington. 

Captain Reuben Marcy. 

John Reed, 

Hartford's Empty Reservoirs, 

The Glebe House — 
Serial Story. 

Departments. 

Etc., Etc. 

•^ 9f^ J^ 

Scz Contents on First Page 





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All conn. \j^ - 

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JOHN E. MORRIS Secretary. E. V. PRESTON, Sup-t of Agencies 




Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



THE 



Connecticut Magazine 



AN ILLUSTRATED MONTHLY. 

Devoted to Connecticut in its various phases of History^ Literature, 
Picturesque Features, Science, Art and Industries* 



JANUARY, 1900. 



Vol. VL 



CONTENTS- 



No. J, 



**The Old Oranaug Inn Stood Hard by the Road."' 

Glimpses of Southington, Past and Present, Illustrated. 

John Reed— J633-J730. Illustrated. 

Captain Reuben Marcy. Illustrated. 

A Vision. Poem. 

Hartford's Empty Reservoirs. Illustrated. 

Song of the Harbor Boats. Poem. 

The Glebe House. Serial Story. Illustrated. 

Hon. Alfred E. Burr. Portrait. 

Departments, — Our Colleges. 

The Home. 

Editorial Notes. 

Genealogical Department. 



(Frontispiece.) 



Elisha R. Newell, 

Charles E. Benton, 

Thomas Knowlton Marcy ^ 

John Howard, 
H. Phelps Arms, 
Henry Rutgers Remsen, 
Chauncey C. Hotchkiss, 

Edited by Cranston Brenton, 
Edited by Louise W. Bunce, 



3 

17 
20 
24 
25 
32 
33 
45 
46 
50 
54 
57 



H. Phelps Arms, Editor. 



Edward B. Eaton, Business Manager. 



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* The Connecticut Magazine 



Vol. 6. 



January, igoo. 



No. I 



GLIMPSES OF SOUTHINGTON, PAST AND PRESENT. 



BY ELISHA R. NEWELL. 




S the pilot 
guides the 
vessel in his 
care from 
Long Island 
Sound into 
New Haven 
harbor, his 
eye ranges 
northward 
in search of 
one of his 
landmark s 
twenty - five 
miles away, 
until it rests upon a precipitous bluff 
which forms the southern terminus of the 
range of volcanic hills v/hich crosses the 
state of Connecticut from north to south. 
This is the West Peak of the Hanging 
Hills and forms the southern terminus of 
the Mount Holyoke range, one of the 
most striking volcanic formations to be 
found in the New England states. These 
Hanging Hills, as they have been 
appropriately named, form the natural 
southeastern boundary between Southing- 
ton and Meriden. 



West Peak, the highest cliff of these 
hills, was, until about seventy-five years 
ago, crowned by another rock of con- 
siderable size which extended several feet 
into the air, forming its pinnacle. 
Viewed from a certain ])oint in the road 
below, near Pratt's Corners, its crest bore 
a striking resemblance to a cat's head. 
David Pratt, now eighty-five years old, a 
descendant of one of the early settlers 
who located near that sj^ot, relates the 
story of the destruction of this pictures- 
que feature of the cliff and its almost 
tragic ending, as he witnessed it, one 
fourth of July, while working with his 
father in the fields below. " The rock," 
he says, " either through the action of the 
frost or in the process of crystallization, 
had opened a seam in a slanting direc- 
tion in the lower part of the rock. A 
party from Meriden who came over on a 
fourth of July frolic, brought with them a 
supply of blasting powder for the purpose 
of blowing off the lower part of this rock, 
and as the seam referred to had become 
partially filled with earth and small 
stones, it was deenuni best to explode a 
few pounds of powder in it to clear the 



4 GLIMPSES OF SOUTHINGTON, PAST AND PRESENT. 




Five miles to the westward and run- 
ning nearly parallel to the trap dyke before 
referred to, is a range of hills of an 
entirely different character, consisting of 
granite, gneiss, and mica schist. These 
hills rise to the height of about seven 
hundred feet, and form the natural west- 
ern boundary of this town, which was 
formerly a part of Farmington. This 
range, also of igneous formation, dating 
at a period '• whereof no man knoweth," 
has been and probably will continue to be 
a puzzle to geologists. It is a continua- 
tion and forms a part of the Green 
Mountain range. Flowing through 
nearly the center of this picturesque 
valley lying between these hill ranges 
winds the river Quinnipiac, once a 
favorite fishing stream of the Indians who 
roamed up and down the valley. In the 
north western corner of the town and 
adjoining Bristol, lies that beautiful, gem 
of nature set in emerald, Compounce 



Lake, 



ever suggesting repose, rest. 



crevice and prepare the way for a larger 
charge. The person selected to light the 
fuse connected with the powder, was 
supposed to have plenty of time to 
escape before the charge exploded. But 
^' The best laid plans of mice and men, 
gan aft agley." In attempting to get 
away after he lighted the fuse he stumbled 
and fell. Mr. Pratt thus gives the sequel ; 
*' We heard a shout from the top of the 
rock, and looked up in time to see the air 
full of dust and stones, and the men and 
women scattering in every direction. 
The rock and man had both gone over 
the cliff. After a while some of them 
came back and went up to the edge of the 
precipice, and there they found the man 
suspended by the tail of his coat, which 
had caught the branch of a dry tree as he 
went over the brink, which saved him 
from going down on to the rocks below." 




jARKD i,e;e;. 



GLIMPSES OF SOUTHINGTON, PAST AND PRESENT. 



Nearly in the center of the southern half 
of the town on an east and west line and 
not one fourth of a mile apart, are the 
three lakelets of somewhat mysterious 
origin, Black, Lily and Podunk, all 
apparently fed by springs, and two of 
which have no visible outlet. Eight mile 
river rising in Bristol to the north of 
Compounce Lake, and flowing in a 
southeasterly direction uniting with the 
Quinnipiac at Plantsville, and Misery 



turous spirits from the Hartford Colony, 
who were exploring the surrounding 
wilderness, and were anxious to learn 
what lay beyond the hills to the westward, 
climbed to their brow, and, emerging from 
the forest, looked down upon the green 
valley at their feet through which the 
Tunxis winds its sinuous course, and from 
the borders of which ascended the smokes 
of the Indian lodges. Nor was it strange 
that, in eager excitement, they promptly 




THE REV. WIIvIvIAM ROBINvSON HOUSE. 



Brook rising in the northeastern part of 
the town, and flowing to the southwest 
uniting with that river near the Cheshire 
line, compose its two principal tributaries. 
These mountains with the lakes and 
rivers form the principal topographical 
features of Southington. 

It must have been with a thrill of de- 
hght akin to that which animated the 
bosom of DeSoto as he first gazed upon 
the " Father of Waters," that the adven- 



returned to tell the glad news of the dis- 
covery of the fertile meadows, so highly 
prized by the early settlers, nor that they 
should take prompt measures to possess 
them. So promptly did they move in 
this matter, that within a year of its dis- 
covery, the settlement of Tunxis, now 
Farmington, had begun. Nor was it 
strange that as the rich alluvial meadows 
were quickly taken up by the earlier 
comers, or were purchased as an invest- 



GLIMPSES OF SOUTHINGTON, PAST AND PRESENT. 



ment by those who did not change their 
residence from the Hartford colony, that 
the later colonists turned their attention 
to the wilderness to the southward, at- 
tracted perhaps to some extent by the 
beauty of the ''hanging" or ''blue 
hills " which were ever in sight. Doughty 
men and true were these early settlers of 
Tunxis, which then included not only 
Southington, or Panthorn, as it was then 



what is now the town's home for her in- 
digent citizens. At that time this section 
of the town was a veritable hunters' para- 
dise. In the woods were found deer, 
wolf, lynx, bears and wild cats, and the 
streams abounded in fish. Beaver were 
also common and traces of their work 
may be seen even now in the remnants of 
a dam which they constructed across a 
section of Misery swamp, and which has 




MAIN STREET. 



called, but also Bristol, Waterbury and 
Wolcott. 

It was about the year 1696, that Sam- 
uel Woodruff, a son of Matthew Woodruff, 
one of the original eighty-four proprietors 
of the Tunxis lands, came here from that 
place, and ingratiating himself with the 
Indians in this vicinity, lived among them, 
tradition says, for two years before re- 
moving his family here. He built a house 
in the eastern part of the town near 



always been known as '' Beaver dam." 
This Samuel Woodruff, who is supposed 
to have been the first white settler in 
Southington, is represented as of great 
physical size and strength, of a good 
natured disposition, and always on excel- 
lent terms with the Indians. It was only 
a short distance from his home that the 
first rude fort or stockade was built, which 
enclosed a well of water, the site of which 
is still to be seen, the well being covered 



GLIMPSES OF SOUTHINGTON, PAST AND PRESENT. 



with a large flat stone. The door of the 
old fort is still in existence, in possession 
of Stephen Walkley. The site of the 
fort is marked by a tall ancient white 
pine. This fort, and two or three others 
in different parts of the 
town was built probably 




as a inotcc tion against the incursions of 
the Mohawks, who were a terror both to 



SOUTHINGTON CHURCHES. 



8 GLIMPSES OF SOUTHINGTON, PAST AND PRESENT, 




THE ISAAC BURRITT PLACE- 

the white settlers, and to the local tribes of 
Indians, who seldom molested the whites. 
After Samuel Woodruff with his family, 
had immigrated, and, by right of squatter 
sovereignty established themselves here, 
settlers from Farmington and other places 
distributed themselves in other parts of 
the town. Prominent among these ap- 
pear the names of Gridley, Lee, Barnes, 
Newell, Clark and others. The Clarks 
came from North Haven and settled to 
the westward of and not far from West 
Peak, and it was owing to this fact that this 
location has ever since gone by the name 
of Clark's Farms. Queen street, now 
North End, was the first hamlet, and the 
names of Gridley, Root, Frisbie and 
Newell are familiar in the ancient history 
of this street. The Curtisses and Lees 
were assigned land in what is now the 




center of the town, and the Newell and 
the Lewis families were among the 
early settlers of the south end cf the 
town. 

It was about the year 1724 that the 
first Ecclesiastical Society, then called the 
Panthorn Society, was formed, which was 
about four years previous to the organiza- 
tion of the church, over which Rev. Jere- 
miah Curtiss was settled as the first pastor 
Nov. 31, 1728. The first meeting house, 
a modest affair about thirty-two by forty 
feet, was erected on the beautiful site 
now known as Oak Hill Cemetery, prob- 
ably on top of the hill near where two 
large oak trees stand, although there are 
indications that point to a location further 
to the south. 




THE CI.ARK HOMESTEAD - CI^ARK'S 
FARMS. 



THE JESSE OLNEY PF.ACE. 

For the first twelve years in the min- 
istry of Mr. Curtiss, harmony and pros- 
perity marked its steady growth and 
progress. The parish was increasing in 
numbers and material resources, but about 
the year 1740 trouble arose upon the 
subject of revivals, Mr. Curtiss and his 
friends opposing the methods of Whit- 
field, and a faction led by Deacon Jared 
Lee, favoring them, the controversy 
became so bitter that it nearly rent the 
church in twain. A modern poet in de- 
scribing it says with some truth : 



GLIMPSES OF SOUTHINGTON, PAST AND PRESENT. 9 

V'"^ " 




THE HIGH SCHOOL AND LEWIS ACADEMY 



" The church in fragments soon was rent, 

Parson and deacon both intent 

To gain a striking victory 

O'er his relentless enemy. 

Many hard names by each were called, 

While church and people stood appalled ; 

***** 
Each one his own sweet will admired, 
And each against his foe conspired." 

Such are the glimpses we get of this 
first church quarrel of nearly one hundred 
and fifty years ago, and which finally re- 
sulted in the dismissal of Mr. Curtiss in 



1755' ^^^ '"'•'^"^ if is said, "He was in- 
tensely conscientious, not a stain of any 
kind rests upon his memory." 

It is not our intention in this brief 
article to give a history of this nor of the 
other churches in this town, bat only to 
call attention to one or two oi the pastors 
that followed. 

The fifteen year's quarrel was over ; a 
valiant minority had sustained Mr. Curtiss 
until the time of his dismissal, but now 
when the pastoral relation had been dis- 



lo GLIMPSES OF SOUTHINGTON, PAST AND PRESENT. 




R. A. NEAI,. 

solved, the people desired peace and it 
was thought to be a favoring Providence 
that soon united them upon Rev. Ben- 
jamin Chapman, who was of the more 
conservative type of revivalists. By his 
unaffected piety and amiable manners he 
won over to himself the friends of Mr. 
Curtiss, and at the same time satisfied 
those who had been 
anxious for more 
radical religious 
measures, and for 
several years every- 
thing ran smoothly ; 
but as in the pas- 
torate of his pre- 
decessor, troubles 
arose owing to the 
chronic discords of 
the people, which finally 
caused Mr. Chapman to retire 
from the pastorate. The 
Revolutionary war came on 
and in some way his estate 
became involved, resulting 
in a large loss of property. 



Amiable and of a sociable nature, he was 
interested in the young, and until he met 
with these financial losses and his wife be- 
came an invalid, his home was the center of 
social attraction to the parish. His two 
or three negro servants were so well fed 
that '^ to live like Chapman's niggers" 
became proverbial, and is used to this day, 
though many are ignorant of its origin. 
He retired after a pastorate of eighteen 
years. The latter part of his life was 
clouded by a series of misfortunes and 
trials from which it seemed impossible for 
him to escape, and which were aggravated 
by the treatment he received from the 
people of his earlier ministry. Of the 
pastors who followed him. Rev. WilHam 
Robinson was probably the most noted. 
Senior tutor at Yale College, he was 
called five years after the dismission of 
Mr. Chapman, when coldness, division 
and decline had wrapped the church 





SOUTHINGTON SCHOOI^S. 



in spiritual stupor. 
For a time he de- 
chned the call, but 
the persistence of the 
society, backed by 
the recommendation 
of President Stiles 
of the college, at 
length prevailed, and 
January 13, 1780, 
he was ordained min- 
ister over the church 
in Southington, and 
for more than forty 



GLIMPSES OF SOUTHINGTON, PAST AND PRESENT. ii 




JESSK OIvNKY. 

jears he was the presiding spirit here, 
and under his prudent and judicial man- 
agement the church regained to a con- 
siderable extent its former estate. One 
who followed him says : " I have stood 
by his grave with friends and remarked, 
^ here lies a great prophet of the Lord. 
He went in and out before the people of 
Southington for forty years and they 
never knew him. They don't know him 
to-day.' " 

The late Hon. Romeo Lowrey, than 
whom there is no better authority, says : 
*' He was one of the great men in an age 
of great men." Roger Whittlesey, Esq., 
says, " He taught the people of Southing- 
ton how to live." 

After his settlement here as pastor of 
the church, finding that his meagre in- 
come was inadequate for the support of 
his family, he turned his attention in a 
new direction, and began early to depend 
for support upon the cultivation of the 
soil ; and with his sound judgment and 
habits of industry, order and economy, 
he achieved phenomenal success, so that 



in ten years after his settlement he had 
in his possession a farm of one hundred 
and fifty acres, including what is now the 
Potter farm and the land south and west 
of Lily Pond, forty hives of bees, a hun- 
dred cows, and several yoke of oxen. 

It was due in a great measure to the 
efforts of the Rev. David L. Ogden, who 
succeeded to the pastorate after the 
retirement of Mr. Robinson, that the 
present church was built. The second 
meeting house, which was built in 1757, 
and stood near and a little to the north of 
where the Soldier's Monument now 
stands, having become somewhat dilapi- 
dated and hardly capable of meeting the 
increasing needs of the growing church ; 
the land upon which it stood was deeded 
to the Congregational Society by Deacon 
fared Lee. The transfer was made Nov. 
12, 1752, when he deeded to the society 
for ''forty pounds money a parsell of land 
containing one acre, to sit a meeting house 
upon ; " and, in another deed of the same 
date, " for twelve pounds old tenor money 
a strip of land on which to build Sabbath 
Housen." This strip was on the east side 





Till': INITAKIAN ClUKCH. 



12 GLIMPSES OF SOUTHINGTON, PAST AND PRESENT. 



of the road and included the land, prob- 
ably now covered in part by the Town 
Hall and the present Congregational 
Church building, which was completed 
in 1830. 

The Baptist Church was constituted in 
1739, but had no corporate existence 
until the close of 1793. The first min- 
ister, Rev. John Merriman, came here from 
Wallingford, in 175 1-2, and died in 1784, 



The first Baptist meeting house was 
erected in 1792 on the site of the dwell- 
ing house now occupied by Dr. W. G. 
Steadman. The second, in which they 
now worship, was built in 1833. 

The corner stone of the St. Thomas 
R. C. Church building was laid about 
1 86 1, and it has since been greatly en- 
larged and improved. The present of- 
ficiating priest is Rev. P.J. Dorian. This 




BIRTHPI^ACK OF^ REV. J0SE;PH H. TWICHKI.I.. 



aged 93. In the little ancient cemetery 
to the southwest of Wonx Springs Cem- 
etery, in Marion, may be seen the plain 
red sandstone slab that marks his grave, 
with this inscription : 

" The Rev. John Merriman, 
Died on Feby. 17, 1784, 

in the 
* 89th year of his age." 
" He was a Calvanistic Anti-pedo Baptist 
Minister." 



church is the largest of any in the town 
and is constantly increasing in numbers 
and influence. 

Prominent among the leading citizens 
of the town in its early days is the name 
of Jared Lee. Coming here from Far- 
mington colony about the year 1734, he 
soon took a prominent position in church 
and public affairs. He was appointed 
one of the deacons of the church, was 



Error, the records show he was born in 1691. 



GLIMPSES OF SOUTHINGTON, PAST AND PRESENT. 13 



commissioned captain of the Second 
Company and the same year was ap- 
pointed by the General Court a justice 
of the peace for the parish of Southington, 
an office which he held until 1780, hold- 
ing weekly court for twenty-five years. 
A portion of his dockets are still in ex- 
istence, being in the possession of his 
great-grandson, Leonard Lee, of Kenosha, 
Wis. He was a representative to the 
General Court, 1754-60-61. At a meet- 



pleasant village of Milldale, which is 
dependent in a great measure for its 
present prosperity on the building up of 
the bolt industry by the Clark Brothers, 
while just above them on the same stream 
is the extensive carriage hardware works 
of the Atwater Manufacturing Co. Here 
in this village dwelt Isaac Burritt, the 
brother of Elihu, the learned blacksmith, 
and who himself was no mean scholar. 
Tall and lank with an awkward gait, he 




THE AI^IvEN BARNES PLACE. 
(Birthplace of Mrs. Charles Goodrich [Martha Barnes] first missiouary to the Samiwich Islands.) 



ing called in 1779 to take steps to organ- 
ize the town of Southington, "Jared Lee, 
Esq., was made moderator as a tribute of 
respect, being the most prominent man 
in the town" (Town Records). He 
filled so many positions of trust that the 
people called him, *'A11 Southington." 

In the southern part of the town, lying 
on both sides of the Quinnipiac and 
adjoining Plantsville on the north, is the 



presented a quaint almost picturesque 
appearance. Like his brother he made 
the most of his opportunities for acquiring 
knowledge, and for many years was a 
teacher here and in adjoining towns in 
our public schools. He was a ready 
speaker and was frequently called upon 
to address public assemblies. He united 
with the Congregational Church in this 
place, in 1S34, and for over fifty years he 



14 GLIMPSES OF SOUTHINGTON, PAST AND PRESENT. 



never missed attending church a single 
Sabbath, whatever the weather might be, 
not infrequently in the winter starting out 
with shovel in hand, and digging his way 



of Plantsville, who in his day was one of 
the foremost business men of the place. 
At the celebration of the ninety-fifth 
birthday of Mrs. Sarah H. Smith, a widow 




THR REvSKRVOIRS. 



through the snow drifts to get there. For 
over forty years he was the teacher of the 
adult bible class in the church. He mar- 
ried Nancy, a daughter of Selah Barnes, 



of a Revolutionary soldier, who at that 
time (August, 187 1), was not only the 
oldest person in town, but the only Revo- 
lutionary pensioner in the state, it is said. 



GLIMPSES OF S0U7HINGT0N, PAST AND PRESENT. 15 





CAPT. AND MRS. ANSON MATTHL,\VS. 



Mr. Burritt made an address in which he 
quaintly said, "An ounce of mother is 
worth a pound of clergy." (Sixteen to 
one.) He died at Milldale, Jan. 7, 1888, 
at the age of 79. 

Martha Barnes, an elder sister of Mrs. 
Burritt, married Rev. Charles Goodrich, 
and these two were the first missionaries 
sent out to the Sandwich Islands, Mrs. 
Goodrich being the first white woman 
who ever set foot on those distant shores. 

Those who pass through the quiet and 
almost drowsy hamlet of Southend, find 
it difficult to picture it as the busiest and 
most thriving part of the town. But such 
it once was, and manufacturing of various 
kinds was carried on there. Foremost 
among these manufacturers was Capt. 
Anson Matthews, whose failure in busi- 
ness about 1830 was due, it is said, to the 
questionable practices of some of his 
agents. He married Lydia Carey Mon- 
tague, of Simsbury, their marriage being 
solemnized by Governor Treadwell, of 
Farmington. They had twelve children, 
all of whom reached maturity. In the 
palmy days of Southend, a large por- 
tion of the wealth and social prestige of 
the town was on this now quiet street. 



It was on the lower em\ of this street 
that Capt. Solomon Fisk lived, whose 
name is connected with the huge piece 
of trap rock, a relic of the glacial period, 
standing near the road between Southing- 
ton and Meriden. The tradition is that 
Capt. Fisk, who was returning from a bam 
raising on East Street, where he had im- 
bibed too freely, came to this rock, and 
supposing it to be an inn, tried to gain ad- 
mittance. Not succeeding he threatened 
dire evil to the inmates if they did not 
let him in, pounding vigorously on what 
he supposed to be the door. The rock 
has ever since been called Capt. Fisk's 
tavern. 




NENVKM. KO.^K— " CATT. KISK S TAVKRN. 



i6 GLIMPSES OF SOUTHINGTON, PAST AND PRESENT. 



Southington, like many other towns in 
this state, may be classed as a thriving 
manufacturing town. The extensive fac- 
tories of the Peck, Stow & Wilcox Co., 
Southington Cutlery Co., H. D. Smith & 
Co., Blakesley Forging Co., Atwater Mfg. 
Co., Clark Bros. & Co., L. D. Frost, 
^tna Nut Co., and the paper bag manu- 
factory Co., which turns a car load of 




ROARING BROOK FAIyl,. 

paper into paper bags each day, are the 
most important, though they do not ex- 
haust the list. 

Among the more prominent names of 
those connected with the building up of 
these industries, may be mentioned the 
names of R. A. Neal, O. W. Stow, and 
Henry D. Smith all of whom have now 



passed from earth. Of these the first 
named, considering his lack of oppor- 
tunities in early life for obtaining an 
education is perhaps the most remark- 
able, as illustrating what energy, untiring 
industry and Yankee push can accom- 
plish. For many years he was president 
of the Peck, Stow and Wilcox Co., The 
Aetna Nut Company and Rolling Mill 
Works, The Southington Cutlery 
Co., and the Southington National 
Bank, and was interested in and 
president of several smaller con- 
cerns. 

Southington has produced a 
goodly hst of noted men, among 
whom may be mentioned Rev. 
Edward Robinson, D. D., LL. D., 
Rev. Levi Hart, D. D., Hon. C. 
C. Langdon, Hon. Romeo Lowrey, 
Rev. Rollin H. Neale, D. D., 
Gad Andrews the historian of 
Southington, and Jesse Olney, who 
though not a native of this town, 
for many years made it his home, 
reared his family here, and here 
" suffered for righteousness sake." 
His series of school books were 
known throughout the United 
States and were among the most 
popular ever published. 

Though naturally inchned to 
conservatism, Southington is tak- 
ing its place among the progress- 
ive towns. New and improved 
buildings, both public and pri- 
vate have been recently built. 
Excellent schools, a free public 
library which has just been estab- 
lished, improved macadamized roads, an 
abundant supply of pure water from moun- 
tain streams, tramway accommodations 
not excelled by any in the state, connect- 
ing with adjoining towns and cities and 
the summer resorts of Compounce, West 
Peak and Hubbard Park, make it conven- 
ient and desirable as a place of residence. 



JOHN REED. 

1633—1730- 



BY CHARLES E. BENTON. 



NO more striking group stands out on 
the pages of seventeenth century 
history than Cromwell's officers. The 
subject of this sketch was one of these, 
and was deeply marked with the strong 
will and high toned moral character so 
peculiar to that cluster of selected men. 
He was from Cornwall and is supposed 
to have belonged to that large family of 
Reeds in Dorsetshire, one of which, Col. 
John Reed, is mentioned in Parlimentary 
Records as having held the Castle of 
Poole against the King's troops in 1649. 

Born and raised in the tumult of that 
upheaval in behalf of wider freedom, it is 
not surprising that he caught the full force 
of its spirit and became, as says the 
record, "a soldier at the age of sixteen," 
and rendered important service to the 
cause. A souvenir of this service, which 
his descendants would hold priceless 
could they now recover it, the sword he 
wore, was preserved in the family in this 
country for more than a century, but was 
finally lost sight of. 

With the collapse of the common- 
wealth, and probably on that account, he 
came to America ; though tradition, ever 
ready to meddle in private affairs, has 
something to say about an elder brother's 
interference in matrimonial plans. He 
settled first in Providence, R. I., in 1660, 
where he married Ann, widow of Francis 
Derby, who became the mother of his 
children. He was probably a man of 



means, and in 1684 he came to Norwalk, 
Conn., having purchased a large tract of 
land there. 

Establishing himself in the western part 
of the town, be built his house on a little 
rise of ground on the eastern side of Five 
Mile river, north of the old post road and 
nearly two miles from Long Island Sound, 
and about four miles westerly from what 
is now the city of South Norwalk. The 
locahty became known as *' Reed's 
Farms." His wife died here and he mar- 
ried again, this time also a widow, a Mrs. 
Scofield, of Stamford. He died at the 
age of 97 and was buried in his own field ; 
I have seen persons who well remember 
the grave marked by unwrought stones. 

The late Newton Reed, author of The 
Early History of the Town of Amenia. 
N. Y., spent considerable effort in learn- 
ing the history of this ancestor and his 
descendants. Through his efforts there 
was, in 1886, a suitable granite tablet, 
an illustration of which is given herewith, 
erected at the grave, ihtr expense of 
which was defrayed by some of John 
Reed's descendants. The last descend- 
ant of the name who resided on the 
homestead place. Mr. Walter Reed, of 
Darien, sold it about ten years ago. re- 
serving however, the plot containing the 
grave. 

Of the life oi' this early ancestor history 
is not as explicit in some respects as we 
might wish, but such records and family 



i8 



JOHN REED. 



traditions as we have indicate that the 
greatness of the man was not a one sided 
greatness, but that the unusual age to 
which he attained was but one indication 
of a strength of character, shared aUke by 
physical, mental and moral faculties. He 
had been an iconoclast in the revolution, 
but now in peace, realizing its greatec 
victories, he became a conservator of the 
social organism. One act is worth not- 
ing in this connection. In this first house 
he arranged a large upper room in which 
he invited the ministers of the 
neighboring parishes to alter- 
nate in holding services, and 
the tradition still survives in 
the neighborhood that these 
were the first Christian ser- 
vices in the vicinity. Such 
a record of a time when sec- 
tarian narrowness of under- 
standing was much more prev- 
alent than it is at the present 
time, indicates a broad and 
wholesome mind. 

His descendants number 
many thousands, probably tens 
of thousands, and the large 
preponderence among them of 
stability and force of charac- 
ter, and of sterling mental and 
moral qualities, indicate that 
they have inherited a goodly 
heritage. 

The family of John^ Reed 
was as follows : 

John, m. Elizabeth Tuttle ; Thomas, m. 
Mary Olmstead ; William ; Mary, m. 

David Tuttle ; Abagail, m. Crozier. 

Of this family John had ten children, 
Thomas had nine, (the Reeds of Sharon 
and Salisbury, Conn, are mostly de- 
scended from him,) and Mary had seven. 

John 2 Reed had children as follows : 

Ann, m. Eliakim Waring ; John, m. 
Hannah Hanford ; Elizabeth, m. Jacob 



Green ; Eleazer, m. Abagail Tuttle ; 
Daniel, m. Elizabeth Kellogg; Experi- 
ence, m. James St. John; Samuel, m. 
Sarah Kellogg; William, m. Rachel 
Kellogg; Mehitable, m. Samuel Brins- 
made ; Moses. 

The three Kelloggs who married into 
this family were sisters. Daniel was 
spoken of as a tall man, and like his 
predecessors was a man of distinction 
and prosperous withal. About the year 
1720 he built a substantial house about 




60 rods north-east of the original settle- 
ment, which was in good order until 
within a few years, and a part of which 
was standing as late at least as 1882. 
His great-grandson, Newton Reed, found 
the family records there. 

Daniel 3 Reed had the following 
children : 

Daniel, m. Mary Bell ; Abraham, m. 
Hannah Bell ; Eliakim, m. Sarah Rich- 
ards, (the ancestry of whose grandfather 



JOHN REED, 



19 



John Latham I should like to find,) 
Elizabeth, m. Joseph Ambler; Benjamin, 

died young ; Lydia, m. Davenport ; 

James, m. Joanna Castle ; Benjamin, m. 
Bethiah Weed ; Ezra, m. Sarah Kellogg ; 
Joanna, m. Stephen Warren ; Elijah, m. 
Esther Bates. 

Of this family Benjamin remained in 
Norwalk and had the homestead. James, 
in 1759, was one of a force intended to 
aid in the capture of Quebec, but it was 
too late for that service, as they received 
the news of its surrender while on the 
way and so retraced their steps. Return- 
ing leisurely towards home he passed 
through the town of Amenia, N. Y. He 
may have stopped for dinner at the 
tavern kept by Daniel Castle at South 
Amenia, and been as much attracted by 
the landlord's daughter as he was by the 
beautiful valley. At any rate they were 
married in the following spring, his 
father meantime having purchased for 
him a farm near at hand where they 
built a house and raised a family of four- 
teen children, all of whom married, and 
all but one of whom left descendants. 



He was miller, farmer and merchant, and 
successful in all ; and he was also a public 
man in a right sense, being prominent in 
town affairs as well as an officer with the 
rank of major in the Revolutionary army. 

His brother Eliakim* Reed moved to 
the same town in 1773, having purchased 
a farm there. His children were as 
follows : 

Sarah, m. Matthew Fitch ; Eliakim, m. 
Rebecca Fitch and Mrs. Breek ; Simeon, 
m. Abial Rice ; Silias, m. Bethiah Hurd ; 
Samuel ; Phineas, m. Esther Reed ; Ezra, 
m. Jemima Fitch and Esther Edgerton ; 
Enoch, died young, Esther, m. Jacob 
Edgerton ; Ruth, m. Jeremiah Fuller. 

Of this family Simeon, Silas and Samuel 
are numbered among the men from 
Amenia who served in the army of the 
revolution. Ezra bought the farm upon 
the death of his father, and his son New- 
ton Reed, before mentioned, succeeded 
to it in turn, passing his ninety-one years 
there. It is now owned by Henry V. D. 
Reed, son of Newton, and on it have 
been born the ninth generation of Reeds 
in America. 




CAPTAIN REUBEN MARCY. 

Orders to Captain Marcy from General James Wadsworth, through Colonel John 
Chester and Major Ripley. 



BY THOMAS KNOWLTON MARCY. 



WHEN a novice begins to study 
closely any part of Colonial or 
Revolutionary history he is surprised to 
find how few documents of the period 
either in print or manuscript have been 
preserved. Letters written home or to 
friends by actors in various scenes for the 
most part were soon lost or destroyed. 
Our early newspapers printed no local 
items on the theory that readers knew 
already the happenings of the neighbor- 
hood. In like manner after events had 
been talked over around the family fireside 
the household did not dream that des- 
criptions of campaigns and battles from 
the absent member could have any further 
value. 

Not so was it with Captain Reuben 
Marcy. He had a praiseworthy habit of 
carefully putting away in his desk every 
scrap of writing. In due time he was 
gathered to his fathers and the desk went 
to the garret to make place for more 
modern furniture. After long banishment 
it was at length restored to its ancient 
honor with its precious treasures intact. 
Here are official papers yellow with age. 
Here are autographs from men and 
women whose descendants have since 
become famous. 

At the outbreak of the Revolution the 
town of Ashford, Conn., had a well 
equipped, well drilled military company 
under command of Lieut. Reuben Marcy, 
the leading merchant of the region. The 



office of captain was vacant. Near by 
lived a farmer who in early youth had 
served in three campaigns and whose 
soldierly qualities were well known. 
Thomas Knowlton was elected to the 
vacancy. His brilliant career proved the 
wisdom of the choice. After the return 
from the hurried march to Boston, fol- 
lowing the Lexington alarm, Lieut. Marcy 
resigned. His business was large, de- 
manding personal attention. Besides at 
that moment there was no lack of volun- 
teers. Every one seemed eager to go. 

A little more than three months after 
the evacuation of Boston by the British, 
March 17, 1776, Sir WiUiam Howe, with 
an array of 30,000 men, supported by a 
powerful fleet, appeared off New York 
harbor. Anticipating an attack at this 
place. General Washington put forth 
strenuous efforts in its defense. Heavy 
drafts were made on the resources of 
Connecticut. Seven battalions were 
quickly recruited for the brigade under 
command of Brigadier-General James 
Wadsworth. Capt. Reuben Marcy raised 
and commanded the fourth company of 
Col. John Chester's battalion. It con- 
sisted of seventy-four non-commissioned 
officers and privates. John Holmes, who 
died Aug. 27, was first lieutenant; Samuel 
Marcy, 2d lieutenant, and Daniel Knowl- 
ton, brother of Col. Thomas Knowlton, 
ensign. This was the second company 
raised in Ashford and vicinity for active 



CAPTAIN REUBEN MARCY. 



21 



service. Nearly all the able bodied men 
of the town were now in the field. 

The following documents, copied from 
the originals show the vigor with which 
the work was pressed. 

East Hartford. June 30, 1776. 
Sir: 

I send you a coppy of Gen'l Wad- 

sworths orders by express to me the one 
rote Last Evening the other this Sabbath 
Morning by which you will see the 
Necessity of marching with what men you 



furnished with armes, and that none be 
suffered to go without as it will be im- 
possible to procure them at Head 
Quarters & their service will consequently 
be renderd Useless. 

James Wadsworth Jr., Brig'r Gen'l. 
To Col. John Chester. 

Another Dated 
Durham, June 30th, Sabbath Mom, 1776. 
Last evening by express I receivd 
another Letter from Gen'l Washington 




HOME 01? captain RKUBEN MARCY IN ASHFORD, CONN. 



can Possibly equip & furnish by next 
Thursday at fartherest. Orders are as 
follows, viz : 

Durham, June 29, 1776. 
Sir: 

In consequence of orders receivd 
from Gen'l Washington you are hereby 
directed to give the Necessary orders for 
expediteing the march of your Regiment 
in the manner heretofore orderd as soon 
as they can Possibly be musterd and 
equipt, & Direct that all your men be 



requesting in the most pressing manner 
not Loose one moment time in sending 
forward the Regiments Destind for New 
York. Must therefore direct that you 
give all Possible Attention lo the Raiseing 
equiping and Sending forward immedi- 
ately your Regiment in manner befor 
Directed as the safety of our army may 
under Heaven depend much on the 
seasonable arrival of the Connecticut 
Regiments. 

jAMfs WADSW(^KrH, JR.. Hrig'r Gen'l. 



22 



CAPTAIN REUBEN MARCY. 



These letters were sent to me from 
Durham by express to Wethersfield & 
from thence forwarded by another express 
to this place where I was attending the 
funeral of Parson Williams Lady.* I 
have seen the principle men here & they 
are engaged to stir up the people to 
Enlist immediately if they will not Col. 
Wm. & Jno. Pitkin tell me the Gov'r is 
Determined to draught from the Militia. 
I have also orderd the men here to be 
ready to March by next Thursday at 
furtherest — if they find it Difficult to get 



Accoutrements, Blanket and Knapsack, 
&c., &c. 

You will send these orders to all the 
Captains and direct them to communi- 
cate them to all their subalterns in the 
four Companies Nearest you. They 
must give notice to the nearest muster 
Master to Muster them immediately — 
dont fail yourself of going next Thurs- 
day & Let me hear from you again. Ex- 
press must be sent if Necessary. 

I am in greatest haste your verry 

Humble Serv't John Chester. 






k:^ 









'"" '' y/- /4- rf '''y 



J'^i )^jn^» /v-*/>x^^ 












y:> 












so 



' ^ ._. 






(fjl 



tFAC-SIMIIvE OF ACCOUNT OF CAPT. MARCY WITH THE CONTINFNTAI. GOVFRNMFNT. 



compleatly furnishd with Cloathes &c. 
opportunities are frequent & conveyances 
Cheap for Articles of Cloathing to be 
sent them by their friends afterwards but 
they must be compleatly equipt with 



To Capt. Rubin Marcy Sir In persu- 
ance of the foregoing orders from Gen'l 
Wadsworth to Colo. Chester & fm him to 
Me you are hereby Ordered to March 
the Compy Under your Command ^ To 



*The wife of Rev. Eliphalet Williams, daughter of Rev. Blisha and Eunice 
(Chester) Williams. Her father was sufficiently versatile to be a clergyman, a Colonel 
of a regiment in active service and rector (president) of Yale College. 

tThis document has an added interest from the fact that Capt. Marcy was paid back 
for money advanced in 1776 in sheets of dollars. We do not know just the date, but as 
the United States did not adopt the decimal system for their money until 1786, he must 
have waited more than ten years for payment. The note added changing the dollars to 
pounds, shilling and pence and making them agree to the fraction is interesting. {Editor. ] 



CAPTAIN REUBEN MARCY. 



23 



New York by Land or water as you think 
Most Convenient there to join the Con- 
tinental Army if the Whole Company is 
Not in Readiness you are to March as 
soon as you have Twenty-five Men Ready 
with one Commissioned & Two Non- 
commissioned officers & in that propor- 
tion. And forward the Rest in Suitable 
divisions as fast as they become ready 
and To do it with all Convenient Speed. 
Thursday next is the Day Perfixed for 
Marching as you see in the foregoing 
orders from Colo. Chester you are to see 
that your Compy is well furnishd with 
Good armes with Bayonets & Cotoach 
Boxes Blankets & Knapsacks youl apply 
to Majr Brown who is the Nearest Muster 
Master To Muster your men as they be- 
come Ready. 

Given Under My Hand in Windham 
(by order of Colonel) this 2d day of 
July A.D. 1776. 

John Ripley, Major. 

July 3rd 1776. 

Capt. Marcy please to forward the Let- 
ter to (Japt. Lyon by an express this 
night if possible beg you will not fail as I 
am so Unwell & have Took physick this 
Day & Expect to Go to N. York Tomor- 
row so that I Cannot procure any body 
here to go besides you Live Much Nearer 
& I Conclude ye Expence will Be Re- 
mitted again by ye Public & am your 
John Ripley. 

The story of the campaign around New 
York City is too well known to require 
repetition. Col. Chester's battahon was 
stationed at the Flatbush pass on Long 
Island, where it was attacked on August 
27th, and barely escaped capture. It 
shared in the fight at White Plains, Oct. 
28th. Its term of service expired Dec. 
25, 1776. 

The means, patriotism and humanity 
of Capt. Marcy were such that he ad- 



vanced to his men and to their families 
full pay and for indemnity awaited the 
convenience of the government. 

At the close of the campaign he re- 
sumed the cares of a business which de- 
manded personal attention. His store 
was the chief distributing point for an 
area of fully sixty square miles. Imported 
goods for the interior were then hauled 
over land, mostly by oxen, from different 
ports. To meet the demands of his 
trade Capt. Marcy often had over thirty 
teams on the road at the same time. 
During the blockade he transported goods 
from a point as far distant as Portsmouth, 
N. H., though his main sources of supply 
were Boston, Providence and Norwich. 
During the Revolution he was especially 
kind to the families of absent soldiers. 
The freedom with which he gave both 
directly and through credits, made heavy 
drafts upon his fortune. 

In late youth he spent four years in 
Providence and Boston learning in a 
broad way the details of mercantile busi- 
ness. Not only the experience thus 
acquired but the friendships then made 
proved very serviceable in later years. 

Raised on a farm he was noted through 
life for judgment in passing on the points 
and value of horses and live stock. This 
gift proved especially useful in purchases 
made for the American and French 
armies during the Revolution. 

A few articles that once belonged to 
Capt. Marcy are still preserved. Mrs. 
L. B. Loomis, of Windsor, has his watch. 
As it has been under water as well as 
under fire its virtue long ago departed. 
His musket that saw service in the Revo- 
lution descended through intermediate 
generations to the writer, who gave it 
two or three years ago to his youthtul 
kinsman, a great-great grandson of Capt, 
Marcy, Charles Guilford Woodward, of 
Hartford, who rightfully inherited from 



24 



A VISION. 



his grandfather, the late Ashbel Wood- 
ward, M. D., a keen appreciation of 
antiquarian treasures. 

Reuben Marcy was son of Edward,* who 
served as first heutenant, 6th company, 
4th regiment, Conn, troops, in the ex- 
pedition against Crown Point, in 1756, 
and later as captain ; and grandson of 
John Marcy, one of the pioneer settlers 
of Woodstock, Conn. The late Prof. 
Oliver Marcy, LL. D., of the North- 
western University, in a genealogical 
article, published in 1875, says that John, 
the emigrant, was son of the high sheriff 
of Limerick, Ireland. 



Among the descendants of John are to 
be found in both male and female lines 
many persons of distinguished merit. 
Mention might be made of General Ran- 
dolph B. Marcy, of the U. S. Army ; Wm. 
Larned Marcy, Governor of New York, 
Secretary of War, 1845-9, 3,nd of 
State, 1853-7 ; of Prof. Oliver Marcy, 
&c., &c. 

Capt. Reuben Marcy was born Nov. 
28, 1732, and died January 14, 1806. He 
married Rachel Watson, of Barrington, 
R. I. 



* Prof. Oliver Marcy erroneously makes Reuben the son of James. 




A VISION. 



BY JOHN HOWARD. 



At first the face arose, then that behind 
Slow issued forth my waking sense to charm. 
When, having seen, my heart in glad alarm 
Flowed out to meet in welcome free and kind. 
For as it slow encroached upon my mind 
With silent pace, I glad perceived the form 
Of her, who once, with love's affection warm 
My longing heart did sooth, but since most blind 
Had been to all my love. Now thus she spake, — 
** Dear heart, I love you," then she kneeling sued 
And sobbing, begged that I the vision take 
As hopeful sign, of former love renewed. 
But I awoke from dreams so wondrous sweet 
Another day of love denied, to greet. 



HARTFORD'S EMPTY RESERVOIRS. 



BY H. PHELPS ARMS. 



WHAT a thirsty lot Hartford people 
are ! A little over a year ago 
all of Hartford's immense reservoirs were 
nearly full; to-day, Dec. 7, 1899, they 
are, with one exception, practically 
empty. The exception is that of West 
Hartford reservoir, now designated as 
No. I. Here is stored some 80,000,000 



sized city of some eighty thousand popu- 
lation, with only the small number of 
thirty-five manufacturies that use city 
water, consuming water at the rate of 
935 pints (we give the quantity in pints 
as that measure is more familiar to the 
average person than the gallon measure), 
a day for a whole year for each man, 




TUMBLEDOWN BROOK RESERVOIR (NO. 6) LOOKlN< 



gallons or, roughly stated, about eight and 
a half days' supply. The figures given 
are based upon the report of the water 
commissioners, which indicates that the 
average consumption of water is, in round 
figures, 9,350,000 gallons a day. Now 
stop and reflect a moment what such 
figures mean. Here we have a moderate- 



woman and child in the city, while New 
York, with its thousands of factories, 
hotels, big office buildings ; its saloons, its 
hundred on hundreds of livery stables 
where water is used in a fashion not 
dreamed of ; its vastly larger number of 
fires, each fire requiring a much greater 
volume of water on an average than that 



25 



26 



HARTFORD'S EMPTY RESERVOIRS. 



used in smaller cities ; yet with all these 
tremendous demands upon its water sup- 
ply the water commissioners of New York 
in 1897 were only required to furnish 1,024 
pints of water per day per capita for this 




lawn sprinkler kept the spigot turned its 
way all day and all night without hinder - 
ance, through the connivance of its 
owner and the possible good-natured 
sympathy of the Honorable Board of 
Water Commissioners. Twenty-seven 
billions, two hundred and twelve millions 
(27,212,000,000) pints a year have thus 
been consumed. The magnitude of the 
extravagance in the use of water which 
these figures indicate would seem to urge 
the more general use of water meters and 
other contrivances to guard against 




TUMBI.KDOWN BROOK RESERVOIR 
(no. 6) I^OOKING SOUTH, AND VIEW 
OF CANAI, CONNECTING IT WITH 
I,OWER RESERVOIRS. 

year, just eighty-nine pints more per 
capita than was consumed by Hartford. 

Nearly one thousand pints a day ! 
That is a good deal of water for a single 
person to use, but it is not pretended 
that it was all expended upon himself 
personally. Some of it he doled out to 
factories. The fire department came in 
for its share. Live stock also had a hand 
in the general thirst, while the ubiquitous 




thoughtless, we will not say wilful, de- 
pletion of the city's water supply. Look- 
ing at the question from the most favor- 
able point of view, it cannot be denied 
that for a city of the size of Hartford to 



HARTFORD'S EMPTY RESERVOIRS. 



27 




NO. 4 RKSKRVOIR I^OOKING WEST. 



consume 27,212,000,000 pints of water a 
year is to say that it has been extravagant 
to the point of foolhardiness. 

The writer does not desire to pose as 
an alarmist, but it is impossible not to 
feel that the situation is grave in the 
extreme and one that calls for prompt 
and decisive action on the part of the 
Water Commissioners looking to the 



better protection of the city's water 
supply. It is the good fortune of the 



NO. 4 RESKRVOIR I.OOKINO EAST. 



28 



HARTFORD'S EMPTY RESERVOIRS. 



city that it has the Connecticut river near 
at hand from which, practically, an inex- 
haustable supply of fairly good water can 
be obtained through the agency of steam 



greatest of engineers? And how long 
does it take to replace a modern pumping 
plant once destroyed? Ask any con- 
tractor ; not in a day nor in ten days. 



pumps. But are pumps, great triumphs We could use electric power, but this, 




;^^m^^^f^mMs^^m^^scM^^ 











NO. 2 RKSE^RVOlR, WEST AND BAST VIKWS. 



of engineering skill though they may be, 
always reliable? Do not these giants of 
mechanical force sometimes break down? 
Has not fire stepped in and doomed to 
destruction the best laid plans of the 



too, takes some time to install. The 
same holds true of power furnished by 
gas engines, all takes time — five days or 
ten days, it depends upon whether the 
right pump is on hand at the moment of 



HARTFORD'S EMPTY RESERVOIRS. 



29 



need, all a matter of pure chance. And 
what if this calamity, the destruction of the 
water works by fire or other causes, 
should overtake the city during the 
scorching heat of mid-summer or the 
icy blast of winter — ten days of water 
famine at a time 
when water is most 
needed, and only a 
drop in the reser- 
voirs ! True, the city 
possesses a number 
of powerful fire en- 
gines capable of forc- 
ing water from the 
Connecticut river up 
into the old Garden 
Street reservoir a mile 
distant, but while this 
would relieve the distress 
it would not meet the whole 
difficulty. Factories d e - 
pending on the city for 
water would have to cease 
running since they certainly 
could not be permitted to 
use water gotten by such ex- 
pensive and desperate means. 
This would mean, if happening in 
the dead of winter, suifering of the 
severest kind to thousands of the 
poorer people and entail discomfort 
and loss to the rich. And over all 
would hover the Demon of Fire 
ready to let the brand or destruc- 
tion fall without warning, and with- 
out hope. It is evident that the 
greatest precautions should be, and 
it is believed are, taken to prevent 
the destruction of the pumping 
station. 

Now, as to the reservoirs. To the 
ordinary observer it seems reckless to 
permit the outgo from the distributing 
reservoir to continue when its source of 
supply from the water-shed is curtailed to 



such an extent as obtains in the present 
instance. It would be, and so it seems 
to many who have discussed the matter, 
desirable to close the water gates leading 
from the distributing reservoir and keep 
them closed so long as the supply from 

the upper 
reservoirs of 
the system 
remains un- 
certain in 
quantity. 
The city 
would then 
have a sup- 




VIEW OF RESERVOIR NO. 3 I.OOKIN1; SOlTH 

AND NORTH AND SOlTH Vli:\VS OF 

NO. 5 RESERVOIR. 

ply always at hand to be used in a gr.ive 
emergency. 

The writer, a few days since, visited 
the different reservoirs of the system and 
had photographic views taken of them. 
In all the views but one he, the writer, 



30 



HARTFORD'S EMPTY RESERVOIRS, 



is seen standing on the bed of the reser- 
voirs to afford the reader the means to 
judge the great size of the reservoirs and 
satisfy them that there is no water in the 
basin. The writer is standing in some 
places fifteen, twenty-five and forty feet be- 
low the water line. To see is to believe. 
There is clearly no water to be had from 
any of the upper reservoirs belonging to 
the city. 

People, and there have been thous- 
ands, who have seen Tumbledown Brook 
reservoir (or reservoir No. 6, as it is 
designated in the Water Commissioners' 




DISTRIBUTING RESERVOIR (NO 

report) when it was full and recall the 
magnificent body of water, one hundred 
and nine acres in extent, a veritable lake, 
its capacity being 765,115,175 U. S. gal- 
lons, will understand the amazement of 
the writer when he came upon its present 
empty condition. ''Shades of Kentucky 
Colonels," he exclaimed, " how could so 
much water be drunk by Hartford people !" 
Reservoir No. 4, with capacity of 601,- 
353,592 gallons, is situated in Farming- 
ton and New Britain townships. It has 
one hundred and sixty (160) acres of 
water surface when full. This reservoir 



has not the average depth of Tumbledown 
Brook reservoir, its immense surface area, 
however, is staggering to the beholder 
when he sees its dry bed for the first 
time and involuntary exclamations of sur- 
prise and astonishment escape him as he 
notes how much water has been used up 
here. All this water was consumed by 
the same thirsty crowd that depleted the 
Tumbledown Brook reservoir of its con- 
tents. Two views are shown of No. 4, in 
both of which the writer is seen standing 
on the bed of the basin, a mere speck in 
the wide expanse of dryness. No. 2 reser- 
voir (capacity 283,- 
694,375 gallons) is 
forty- one feet deep 
and covers forty- 
nine acres, and is 
situated in what is 
known as Reservoir 
Park, distant some 
six and a half miles 
from the City Hall. 
The two views of 
this reservoir given 
here show it to be 
the most pictures- 
que of the group 
in the contour of 
i t s embankments 
and uneven water 
In one of the views of this reser- 
voir the writer is seen standing 
some forty feet below the water line 
and he does not have to so as much as 
roll his trousers up an inch to avoid get- 
ting them wet. Turning around in about 
the same place and looking south-easterly 
we see still further evidence of emptiness 
to which this reservoir, one of the deepest, 
can be reduced. Adjacent to No. 2 is 
No. 3, twenty-five acres in extent and 
thirty-six feet deep, with capacity of 145,- 
595,829 gallons. There is some water in 
the lower part of the basin (about thirty 



HARTFORD'S EMPTY RESERVOIRS. 



31 



millions of gallons), but the greater part 
of the water bed is -dry. No. 5 reservoir 
is empty in its northern portion save for 



We close this paper with the presenta- 
tion of views of the Connecticut river at 
the point where the water is pumped into 
the mains leading to the Garden street 
reservoir. A view of the old reservoir is 
also shown, together with a picture of the 
pumping station. 

The people of Hartford now have 
abundant reason to reproach themselves 




a small stream running through it. The 
southern end of this reservoir contains 
about twenty-five millions of gallons (two 
days and a half supply). This reserv^oir 
is about half a mile from the distributing 
reservoir. It is twenty feet deep at 
its southern end : capacity not yet fully 
ascertained as there have been some 
changes made in the embankment since 
the last measurements, but we infer from 
former measurements that it can hold 
over one hundred millions of gallons. 

Reservoir No. i is the distributing point 
of the system. Here the water is very 
low as can be seen in the photograph 
shown with this. This reservoir is thirty- 
six feet deep and holds, \vhen"7ull, 145,- 
985,543 gallons. 



VIEWS OF THK OAKHKN SrRKhl Kh>hK- 
VOIR, THE CONNECTICUT RIVER WHERE 
WATER IS PUMPED INTO THE MAIN AND 
THE PUMPINO STATION. 

for not heedini; the oft repeated warnings 



32 



SONG OF THE HARBOR BOATS. 



to be careful in the consumption of water 
and they will doubtless in future show 
more alacrity in retrenching on their 
wasteful expenditure in this direction. 



This condition of affairs can apply to other 
points of the state with no less force than 
to Hartford. 









i& 


H 




KillBilEilEi^ 


EiEvlE^3E'll 


■'^^ 


|£r 








- 





SONG OF THE HARBOR BOATS. 

(Fort Independence, Boston Harbor.) 



BY HENRY RUTGERS REMSEN. 



We are the wardens of the bay 
That bring the good ships home. 

For us no far sea-questings are 
To headlands lashed with foam ; 

Our faith is but a little breath 

Of buoyed shoal and sea, 
Our farthest far, the harbor bar — 

The coast-wise ones are we. 

The great ships woo the ocean's way. 
Fleet breeze and proud flood tide. 

Contented with the land-locked bay, 
We leave the leagues untried. 

Ah let them sail to ahen seas : 

View mountains past our ken : 
Reach marge-lands of Eternity ; — 

They'll ask our aid again. 

For ever at last, the great ships come 
To us for their release, 

And through the foam we guide them home- 
Home to the Port o' Peace. 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



BY CHAUNCEY C. HOTCHKISS. 



CHAPTER I. 



The Chairman of the Cojiimittee. 



THE old Oranaug Inn stood hard by 
the road leading through the ancient 
village of Woodbury, and was about the 
first building approached by the traveler 
from the south. It seemed, and seems to 
this day, to stand like a sentinel guarding 
the long, tree-embowered street of the 
town, for, as one goes up by way of the 
Southbury road, which is over the old 
Indian trail, once leading from the 
Housatonic river north to Bantam, the 
line of demarcation betwixt the open 
country and the village is sudden enough 
to cause surprise. 

And if abrupt to-day it was far more 
so over a century ago, as, to the south^ 
for many miles, lay a semi-wilderness 
broken only by the river and the clearings 
of the yeomanry who had chosen for their 
homes this fair valley of the Pomparaug. 
Like all Litchfield county it is a lovely 
country, passing from a ruggedness of out- 
line (as though nature had placed a per- 
petual scowl upon the land) to the lapping 
of low hills, soft valleys and exquisite dis- 
tances, as if the same mighty power was 
begging forgiveness for its sometime 
harshness. 

With the frown of a towering height of 
forest-clad rocks on one side and the 
smile of the wide meadows of the Pompa- 
raug on the other, silent and sleeping lay 
the town of Woodbury on a night in the 



early spring of 1775. Through the length 
of the black street the Oranaug Inn was 
the only building showing a light that 
might prove a guide or an invitation to 
hospitality for the possible wayfarer. The 
wet March wind, softened on its journey 
from the south, yet with a shivering chill 
in it, sounded a diapason through the 
barren elms about the door, violently 
swung the creaking sign-board on its 
twisted iron bracket as though it would 
drive the painted image of the old sachem, 
Oranaug, from its frame, and then went 
howling up the wide highway. Great 
patches of sodden snow showed like 
ghosts in the hollows and to the north of 
every obstruction, while in the lee of 
houses and where the woods were thick 
they wasted themselves in wreaths of 
vapor that blew away like smoke. The 
rotten ice crashed under foot, and on the 
southern slopes of the rop.d-^ the nuul was 
deep and tenacious. 

As though in protest against the com- 
fortable rise and fall of the fire, the light 
of which shot through the small panes of 
the coffee-room or bar of the tavern, the 
wind banged the ill-fitting doors, rattled 
the casements and roareil down the im- 
mense chimneys like a veritable evil spirit. 

In common with most taverns of the 
day, especially those throughout Connec- 
ticut, the bar of the Oranaug Inn was 



33 
3 



34 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



comfortable enough at all times, but 
doubly so on a night like this. The fire 
in the cavernous chimney threw its light 
on the conventional array of pewter pots 
and platters ranged over the bar, each 
piece winking in the rise and fall of the 
glow ; while the two candles which were 
supposed to illuminate the immediate 
vicinity of the ' tap ' well-nigh shivered 
themselves out as their flames shook in 
the searching draught. The high- backed 
settles were drawn close and the table 
placed between them; the tall clock 
clicked with a tick which could be heard 
above the noise of the wind, and the black 
rafters of the ceiling held mysterious 
depths of shadow in their courses. 

In ordinary times the tavern would 
have been deserted long since, for to the 
steady going New Englander the hour 
was late. But to-night the room had held 
a fair sprinkling of inmates as the post 
had been hourly expected from Hartford, 
the old Indian trail being a fairly direct 
route from that town to New York. Grave 
matters were afoot and every eye was 
turned toward Massachusetts Bay where 
the poHtical pot was boiling hard and in 
momentary danger of boihng over. As 
the hours waned without the appearance 
of the looked-f or messenger, one by one 
the sleepy farmers had withdrawn until at 
last there remained only Squire Strong, 
the Chairman of the 'Committee of 
Inspection,' and a few of the younger 
element of the town held by patient ex- 
pectancy and a desire for sensational 
news. 

The Squire, by reason of both age and 
his office, sat in solitary state on the end of 
a settle, armed with a long pipe and a 
glass of spirits. Lounging on a small 
bench, somewhat removed, were three of 
the aforesaid sensation seekers, great, 
strapping specimens of the rising genera- 
tion, while in his own particular chair. 



tipped back against the woodwork of the 
bar, with a hound lying at his feet, sat 
old Tobey, the host of the Oranaug, fast 
asleep, his snores keeping admirable time 
to the swing of the clock's long pendulum. 

It had been tedious waiting. The com- 
mittee itself had given over hoping for 
the post, and leaving the chairman to 
represent them in case it should arrive, 
had retired to their homes and beds, and 
now,, but for the wind, the clock, the 
snoring host and an occasional whisper 
among the trio on the bench, all was 
silent. 

Though his eyes were closed the chair- 
man was not asleep. This was seen in 
the energy with which at intervals he 
pulled at his pipe as though troubled in 
thought. And the squire was troubled in 
thought — indeed he was trying to untie 
the knottiest problem of his official life. 
The 'Committee of Inspection and Obser- 
vation,' picked by the town from among 
the most solid men of the valley, had 
been empowered and directed by the 
' High Court ' at Hartford to weed out 
the royalists of the township and see to 
it that the heresy of loyalty to George 
III., of England, did not spread. The 
committee had done its work well, using 
star chamber methods in its proceedings, 
and without fear or favor had swung the 
club of its commission over each sus- 
pected household. Even Jeptha Beacon 
of the * holler store,' the wealthiest and 
most influential merchant in the colony, 
had fallen under the ban of the com- 
mittee, though to the disgust of its worthy 
chairman, who had vigorously pressed the 
charge, he was acquitted of disloyalty to 
the colonies, the only thing found against 
him being the fact that he had been 
shrewd enough to buy all the salt for sale 
for miles about and had been holding 
that indispensable commodity at an ex- 
orbitant figure. The most the committee 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



35 



could do in this case was to decree a cer- 
tain fixed price on salt and compel the 
old gentleman to sell to all comers on 
specified days. 

This failure to convict was, to the ener- 
getic chairman, a source of great annoy- 
ance, but it was a small matter compared 
with the case now confronting him. The 
Rev. Archibald Challiss, of the Episcopal 



bring confusion on the traitors who were 
trying to disrupt the kingdom. 

The town was aghast but the then 
existing laws of Connecticut forbade Ja 
minister being molested on the Sabbath 
on any pretext and the committee's 
hands were tied for that day. On Mon- 
day the Rev. Challiss seemed to have 
melted into thin air and had continued to 




"AT THE SAME INSTANT THE DOOR OF THE ROOM OPENED- 



church had appeared in his pulpit after 
a short absence from town, and had 
openly prayed for the king in the face of 
his having been warned to forego that 
portion of his ritual. During the follow- 
ing week he could not be found, though 
the next Sunday saw him in his chancel, 
where he again not only asked the Al- 
mighty to bless his sovereign, but to 



remain invisible though he was seen to 
enter the Glebe house, which on being 
searched failed to discover a sign of his 
recent presence and its inmates pro- 
fessed a profound ignorance of the 
whereabouts ot the rector. 

It was this matter which was now dis- 
turbing the chairman. .\ stern faced 
man, severe — even fanatical in lx)th 



36 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



politics and religion, it irked him sorely 
to be thus defied by anyone, especially 
by a representative of the Church of 
England, and his usually genial temper 
was soured as he brooded over the 
manner in which both the town and the 
committee had been flouted. As it was, 
his present displeasure was shown in 
low mutterings and such violent puffs on 
his pipe that at times he was shrouded in 
a thick blue haze. 

The clock was just beginning to whirr 
preparatory to striking the hour of ten 
when a noise was heard without and the 
hound bounded to his feet with a short 
bark. At the same instant the door of 
the room opened admitting a fierce blast 
of wind which hurled the sand on the 
floor half way across the apartment, and 
with it came a man whose appearance 
indicated that he was at least one remove 
above those on the bench. The saluta- 
tion greeting him, however, showed he 
was no one of importance, and simply 
ordering a glass of rum from the now 
aroused landlord, he walked across the 
room with a lurch which betokened slight 
intoxication — no great sin in those days- — 
and seating himself on the settle opposite 
the squire, stretched his legs to the fire, 
first carefully depositing against the wall 
an immense green cotton umbrella, then 
a recent innovation into the colonies. 
He was a young man — not above twenty- 
three. His face was not prepossessing nor 
was he in rude grace, strength or figure, 
the equal of anyone in the room. But if 
Nature had failed to greatly favor him in 
these respects, he was not repellent. A 
quick, though decidedly furtive black eye, 
delicate hands showing him a stranger to 
hard manual labor, and a clean cut look 
about him gave him individuality enough 
to place him somewhat in contrast with 
the others. His dress, too, was a shade 
less rough than the coarse garments of the 



rest, and his hair, of an inky blackness, 
was queued and beribboned with the 
greatest care. The fact that his umbrella 
was the source of a rivulet of water which 
trickled along the floor, and that his 
small-clothes were soaking, showing that 
the weather was growing worse as the 
hours progressed. As he received his 
measure of rum from the landlord he 
broke the silence sharply. 

" The post has come and gone, Squire 
Strong. He left his packet at Deacon 
Walker's, together with his horse, and 
then took himself off" afoot." 

The burly figure of the squire straight- 
ened with surprise as he asked : 

" Did ye see him?" 

" I did not ;" was the short reply. 

" And when did he arrive, good Mas- 
ter Cyrus Bent? " asked the squire, with 
. a slight knitting of the brows at the idea of 
'the committee having been thus ignored. 

" Some two hours agone ;" was the 
rejoinder. 

"What? — and hast thou loitered for 
two hours?" demanded the squire as he 
rose to his feet. " Dost think I have the 
patience of a setting hen to await the 
whim of a boy? Two hours — and I — " 

" So please you, sir ;" broke in the 
young man apparently abashed ; " — I 
little thought the committee would be in 
waiting on such a night — I little expected 
to find you here at this hour. I was 
acting as escort to Mistress Hetty Wain 
and only dropped in here for — " 

" The Glebe house lass, ha ! " inter- 
rupted the squire, not molhfied at this 
reference to the subject of his recent 
thoughts. "—And 'tis Mistress Hetty 
who may account for that frivolous 
green tent ye brought hither ! Where 
got ye that abomination ? Has the rain 
ceased to fall by the Lord's will that ye 
seek to hide from a wetting? 'Tis 
against sense and reason ! " 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



37 



'^'Tis somewhat aside from the sub- 
ject;" returned the young man, looking 
up with a smile that was almost a sneer ; 
" — but on that footing, and with due 
respect, you had better take the roof 
from your house or stand yourself and 
family outside to meet the next storm. 
Why do we seek the shade in summer or 
the fire in winter?— the Lord holds as 
one, both heat and cold !" 




WK WKE) IT NOT ! — WE IvIKK IT NOT ! " 

"He has ye there, Squire," broke in 
the landlord. "Faith, I think the new 
notion o' carryin' a roof wi' ye is none so 
bad a one — albeit it makes a man look 
Hke a toad-stool ! " 

" I tell ye, Cyrus Bent," said the squire, 
with an angry flush, ignoring both the 
landlord and the matter in hand, " I tell 
ye thy ways are well known and this 
hovering about the Glebe house savors of 



a desire for an alliance with Episcopacy. 
Mayhap ye have a league with the Domine 
Challiss and are used by him for traitorous 
purposes. Let me but hear the tinkle of 
the royalist about ye and I swear ye will 
smart for't. We hke it not 1— we like it 
not ! " The old gentleman began pacing 
the floor. "And how now?" he con- 
tinued, wheehng about, " What betwixt 
clarking it for Beacon, whose house lays 
but a stone's throw from the tory parson's, 
and dilly-dallying about the girl, have we 
not enough to warrant the probe being 
put to ye? Does not the Glebe house 
an' the holler store hold enough of loyalty 
to the tyrant to make it worth while to 
suspicion ye? Fie on me, lad ! " he sud- 
denly exclaimed, lowering his voice which 
had been raised until the room rang, " fie 
on me ! I mean not to be over harsh wi' 
ye, but my bed has been waiting me these 
three hours an' I have the length o' the 
street an' a Noah's torrent to face. I 
doubt ye not ! — I doubt ye not ! " And 
with a quick transition of temper possible 
only in those possessing a soft heart, the 
squire turned and took down a heavy 
cloak hanging on a peg in the back of 
the settle. 

Under the lash of the squire's tongue 
and the but half concealed grins of the 
three sitting against the wall the young 
man hung his head, though the baleful 
light in his eye plainly indicated his un- 
forgiving temper. He held himself well, 
however, and as the old gentleman tlung 
his cloak about him, said : "I am sorry 
you are so put out by my delay, Sc]uire 
Strong, and to shield you from the Noah's 
flood you fear I will loan you that same 
green tent to ward it from your venerable 
head." 

This was spoken with such a show of 
seemingly genuine humility that the slow 
brain of the elderly man failed to catch 
the disrespectful import of the words. 



38 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



*'Nay, lad" was the kindly answer of 
the squire as he carefully knocked the 
ashes from his pipe lest its long stem 
should be broken, and settled his three- 
cornered hat more firmly on his head ; 
'^Ere I would crawl along Woodbury 
street like an overgrown turtle under an 
ill-fitting shell, the drops might be buck- 
shots Good night to ye all." 

But Cyrus Bent was in a 
pecuHarly defiant mood. 
What with the recent small 
clash of words in which his 
superior logic had failed to 
make him appear the victor, 
and what with other matters 
bearing on him, he had no 
intention of letting the squire 
depart just then. For an in- 
stant a gleam of venom 
shot from his black eyes 
(venom being largely mingled 
with his nature), and as the 
chairman laid his hand upon 
the latch the young man 
spoke as though his remark 
was of the most common 
place character. 

*' By the way. Squire, I saw 
the Domine to-night." 

The old man swung about 
as though on a pivot. 

"The Domine ! The Dom- 
ine who?" 

" The Domine Chalhss, to 
be sure." 

"And where saw ye the 
Domine ChaUiss?" demanded the old 
man as he returned to the center of the 
room, profound interest mingled with 
anger showing on his broad face. 

"At the Glebe house — or if not within, 
at the door of the same." 

"An' ye did not arrest the man in the 
name o' congress and the committee ! " 
gasped the squire, snapping the pipe 



stem in his excitement then with great 
violence dashing the remains of the clay 
to the floor, " Fore God ! ye dullard ! 
wert afeared, or be ye hand in glove with 
his mouthings ? or are ye slow to know 
how he has insulted the town and openly 
blasphemed by asking the Almighty to 
damn a righteous cause ? I think we may 
well suspicion ye ! " 




CANNOT DO THAT — INDEED, 



It was plain that Cyrus Bent had not 
looked for this outburst as a result of his 
attempt to hold the old patriot, for he 
appeared to shrink beneath the tirade. 
Gathering himself together he glared back 
at his opponent, and speaking deliber- 
ately, said : 

" Why do you doubt my loyalty to the 
colonies, Squire Strong? I have openly 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



39 



exposed the presence of the rector— be- 
cause — because — well, as for arresting him 
— he tops me four inches and outweighs 
me two stone ; beside there was his god- 
daughter betwixt us." 

" Well ! well ! " returned the chairman, 
impatiently," " an' twas on account o' 
pounds an' inches an' yer lass that ye 
held yer hand, hey? Is that it?" 

'^Aye — certainly " — came the ready re- 
ply. 

''An' ye stand not betwixt the rector 
and justice ; am T right? " 

"You have it precisely." 

" Then by the great Power I'll put yer 
mettle to the test ! " exclaimed the old 
man with a change of tone. "An' ye 
have no love for the Domine, go now 
with me, storm or calm, an' we'll set the 
man under lock an' key in half an hour. 
He is at home, that I have yer word for. 
Are ye ripe for't? " 

Well had it been for the young man 
had he then and there closed with the 
offer, but instead of leaping at this pro- 
posal to vindicate his loyalty to the 
patriotic cause, he visibly quailed. He 
mumbled something under his breath, of 
which the words ' Mistress Hetty ' and 
* ingratitude ' alone were heard, and with 



a helpless look around sank back on the 
settle from which he had risen, saying : 
" I cannot do that — indeed, I cannot do 
that ! " 

Then it was that the squire's temper 
came to a white heat. " I have ye now, 
my lad ! " he thundered, walking up to 
his victim and snapping his great fingers 
in his face. '' Ye flinch at the opinion 
of the Doraine's god-daughter if ye lay 
a hand to dig out the old fox, but will- 
ing enough ye are to mark the burrow 
and have others bag the game. I tell 
ye now that ye be a coward an' un- 
worthy o' the wench. Does the parson 
stand betwixt ye and the lass ? I fancy 
so ! I fancy so ! Now listen ! To-mor- 
row the committee calls upon the Domine 
on the strength o' yer information, 
an' mark it, ye shall be with them. 
Ye will make it plain then whether ye be 
for the colonies, the king or yerself only, 
so rest ye on that and hold yerself ready. 
In my opinion ye love yerself most an' 
the king comes next ; — hold yerself 
ready, I tell ye." 

And with this the squire abruptly 
turned and left the room, shutting the 
door behind him with a bang. 



CHAPTER II. 



His Own Petard. 



WITH the heavy slouching move- 
ments of overgrown, muscle- 
bound youth, the trio on the bench 
gathered in their long legs and prepared 
to depart, the loud guffaw following the 
exit of Squire Strong showing at once the 
scant fellowship they held for Bent as 
well as the restraint under which they had 
been placed by the presence of the 
chairman of the Committee of Inspection. 



With unconscious coarsncss they jibed 
the young fellow on the settle with the 
' fix ' into which he had gotten himself, 
advising him to take himself and ' umbrell ' 
to bed and hatch a scheme to get even 
with the ' old man !' With keen animal 
enjovment they had witnessed his dis- 
comfiture, and as they pluniied through 
the inky blackness of the street, it was 
' admired ' how the squire * had skinned 



40 



THE GLEBE HOUSE, 



Cy. Bent who daresent be aj holdin' his 
nose so darn high arter this." 

But strange as it may appear, Cyrus 
Bent was not thinking of the squire, as he 
sat where he had fallen on the settle, but 
of the Rev. Archibald Challiss. It was 
he who had precipitated the trouble. 
In the slightly rum fogged brain of the 
clerk of the ' hollow store ' there was an 
appreciation of first cause — Challiss — and 
all effects relative thereto sprang from the 
rector. By far too conceited to admit 
that his own blundering had aught to do 
with the more than uncomfortable posi- 
tion in which he now found himself, he 
went directly to first principles — for the 
sole reason that the squire had hit the 
nail squarely on the head; — the rector 
did stand between him and Mistress 
Hetty Wain. Not that he was at all sure 
that had the obstacle been removed his 
way to win the hand of the girl was 
certain, but one stumbling block was 
there which he would be well rid of. His 
hot brain had taken a hold on two fancies 
— first, that the rector personally dis- 
liked him both for himself and his low 
social position, and second, that he was 
casting something warmer than a fatherly 
eye upon his own god-daughter. That 
the man was forty and the girl but twenty 
had no weight in the moody, love stricken 
brain of Cyrus Bent. The demon of jeal- 
ously leaped at him and had sat upon his 
shoulder for weeks — aye, months, in fac^ 
ever since that golden day when he had 
seen the girl come riding home from 
Hartford on a pillion behind her god- 
father. Since then his days had been 
miserable ; his nights, hours of acute 
suffering. He saw what a foil the 
sprightly (and, to him), highly educated 
beauty would make to the tall, handsome 
and dignified student of theology ; a 
power m the church, an aristocrat to his 
fingers tips. He saw, or thought he saw, 



something more than a fatherly solicitude 
in the rector's attention to the girl — 
something deeper than respect in her 
frank acceptance of the same. That her 
own father was also a tenant of the Glebe 
house brought no grain of comfort. " The 
devil might play fast and loose under the 
nose of Thaddeus Wain and he be none 
the wiser," was the comment of Bent. 
And to a certain extent he was right for 
Thaddeus Wain had been cut down in 
his prime and now half paralyzed, more 
than half deaf and none too strong of 
mind he was but little better than an 
overseer of home-lot chores and passed 
most of his life smoking in the sun in 
summer and by the kitchen chimney in 
winter. 

With a man possessing the nature of 
Bent the object of his jealousy passed 
rapidly and by easy transition into the 
object of his hatred, and in just propor- 
tion as grew his love for the girl, had 
grown a bitter, rankling though secret 
enmity to the man. His finer quauties 
were stifled under the mingling of these 
two overwhelming passions, which, God 
wot, have held the world in thrall since 
man began ; and, when that evening, to 
his great surprise, he had seen the rector 
come to the door and receive his god- 
daughter without giving him the usual 
invitation to walk in himself, his brain 
conceived the weak plan of setting the 
committee on the track of the church- 
man who had so long eluded all attempts 
to arrest him, and not dreaming that as 
an informer he would become implicated, 
had done so in a simulated off-hand 
manner and with the foregoing results. 

To meet Hetty Wain on the morrow, 
would, under the circumstances, damn 
him forever in the eyes of that young 
lady. For her he had suffered much — 
from his standpoint. All the misery he 
had undergone appeared to him a sacri- 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



41 



fice of self solely for her. His worship 
of this girl, shown only in affectionate 
innuendoes from which she appeared to 
recoil, only increased the debt she owed 
him. For her he had endured the merci- 
less ridicule of the village on account of 
that green cotton umbrella which he had 
brought from Hartford to protect her 
pretty head ; and for her, he protested 
inwardly, he was ready to die. 

It occurred to him that he might warn 
the minister of the intended visit of the 
committee, but he saw the hazard of such 
an act as the absence of the rector would 
reflect on himself. He was the one 
young man in the village who had not 
been loud in the expression of his 
political opinions, (if indeed he had any) 
there being too much on his heart and 
brain for him to take an interest in aught 
but the passion consuming him ; and 
being both of English birth, a compara- 
tive new comer in the town of Woodbury 
and without influence, the natural result 
of a failure to arrest the rector would be 
to put him in the light of a false witness 
and bring upon him the heavy hand of 
the committee. Public disgrace was an 
abhorrent thing to him. To him it meant 
jail in Hartford and a long absence from 
Hetty Wain. 

His next thought was to have Hetty 
away from the Glebe house at the critical 
time, but even this being possible it was 
folly to think that his part in the arrest 
of the minister would not be known far 
and wide. There were but two ways out 
of his dilemma, and those — in some way 
to prove his high patriotism in the eyes 
of the committee, thereby leaving them 
nothing to doubt, or to warn the minister 
and take the consequences. The last 
would probably have been acted upon 
had not Fate seemingly put the possibility 
of the first in his hands. 



In his deep perplexity the young clerk 
had twice gone to the bar and, in an 
abstracted manner drank off two more 
measures of raw rum as though the liquor 
was a brain lubricant. The landlord, 
visibly showing impatience as his moody 
guest still lingered, was industriously 
covering the great backlog with ashes as 
a smart hint that he wished more for his 
bed than for the young man's custom, 
when the hound, now curled on the 
hearth, again leaped to his feet and 
growled a plain warning that a stranger 
was approaching. 

As the landlord, still on his knees, 
turned to look over his shoulder, the 
door opened and together with the new 
arrival admitted a blast of wind that 
filled the room with its chilly breath. In 
a trice the guttering candles were ex- 
tinguished, and the half banked fire, now 
but a glowing mass of coals livened by 
the strong draught, was the only light in 
the large apartment. 

With a muttered curse at the sudden 
darkness the landlord hastened for a fresh 
candle, and by the time its feeble rays 
made the outlines of the room visible, the 
new arrival had walked to the great 
chimney, thrown his soaking cloak across 
the settle, and with his back to the fire 
stood scanning the room and its 
occupants. 

As the candle was placed upon the 
table and its light fell upon the face of 
the stranger, the half intoxicated man at 
the bar gave a lurch forward, then 
steadied himself as he gazed at the tall 
figure before him for to all appearances 
there, in the flesh, stood the Rev. Archi- 
bald Challiss. Though the landlord did 
not appear to notice anything tamiliar 
about his late coming guest, it might have 
been for the reason that the wick of the 
candle being newly kindled, its light was 
none of the brighest and the gentleman 



42 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



had the broad collar of his coat turned 
up about his ears. 

As Bent gave a muttered exclamation, 
the stranger swung about to the fire 
putting the breadth of his athletic look- 
ing back to the room and then all doubts 
vanished from the mind of the young 
clerk. It was the rector in person ; the 
only differences noted being that his 
queue was tied instead of clubbed, and 
that in lieu of his usual pumps he now 
wore heavy riding boots well splashed 
with mud. In his well known and 
resonant voice the new comer bespoke a 
bed which had felt the warming pan then 
ordering a glass of spirits sat himself 
down by the dying embers to await the 
landlords return, gazing moodily the 
while at the faint blue wreathes of smoke 
drifting up the chimney. 

What the episcopal rector could be 
doing at the Oranaug Inn at an hour 
close to mid-night, asking for a bed when 
his own house was within rifle shot, was 
something more than a simple puzzle to 
the now addled wits of Cyrus Bent. 
Could it be that his enemy desired to 
escape from the town knowing the danger 
that always threatened him was daily 
growing greater ? If so he would hardly 
have chosen the inn in which to conceal 
himself that night. What could have 
happened to render his hiding place un- 
safe? it had recently held him securely 
enough. 

Nothing to clear these matters pre- 
sented itself to Bent nor did he give the 
subject much thought. The one thing 
plain to him was that at the fire sat the 
rector whom Providence had clearly 
placed in a position to be warned. The 
conditions appeared to be an answer to 
an unspoken prayer. 

Casting a glance about to make sure he 
was unobserved. Bent silently crossed the 
room and stooping to the ear of the 



seemingly engrossed rector, whispered : 

" Get from the town to-night, sir, you 
are in danger ! The committee is going 
to the Glebe house to-morrow morning. 
I heard so not an hour since. I tell you 
this at great risk to myself!" 

For an answer the sitter turned about 
suddenly. 

" The devil it is ! What has any com- 
mittee to do with me, and how am I in 
danger?" 

As the supposed divine thus spoke he 
came to his feet, throwing down the col- 
lar of his coat as he faced Bent, and that 
young man staggered back as he saw the 
stranger's face now full in the stronger 
glow of the candle. If it was the Reverend 
Archibald Challiss he had grown a small, 
brown military looking moustache within 
a few hours, but aside from this novel ad- 
dition to his features and a change in the 
cut of his black clothes, it was the min- 
ister. There was the same figure, the 
same dark eyes, the same straight nose 
and facial contour, with its strong and 
handsome outline of chin and forehead. 
The voice was the same, but the manner 
was totally different. The action was too 
quick and lacked the quiet dignity of the 
rector, and without a doubt the stranger 
was much younger, in fact, not over 
thirty years of age. For an instant Cyrus 
Bent blinked at the man before him, who, 
in turn, tried to look through his sudden 
and unwelcome disturber, and then find- 
ing his voice and his wits together, the 
clerk stammered : 

" I — I took you to be the — the Domine 
Challiss ! Are you — are you his ghost? " 

'' Challiss ! Challiss ! " broke out the 
stranger, impatiently, " well, I suppose I 
do look like Challiss nor have lacked 
being told the same, times enough. Where 
is Challiss, in the name o' God ? Have I 
not been pounding at the Glebe house for 
an hour past? The place is deserted." 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



43 



"Nay, he was there to-night ! " answered 
Bent, recovering himself. 

"There to-night and allow a man to 
stand outside ! I tried each door and 
window. The place was as tight as a fort 
and as silent as the pit ! " 

"Like as not," was the answer, "but 
he is there, or was. What would you 
have of him? " 

"And is Hetty — I beg her pardon — is 
Mistress Wain with him?" asked the 
stranger with something hke interest tak- 
ing the place of the disgust he had shown. 

Bent gave a gulp. "I think she is," 
he answered slowly and suspiciously just 
as the landlord re-entered the room. Then, 
as an idea flashed on him, he continued 
with a decided raise of voice : " I think 
she is, but sir, the times are a bit twisted 
and as you are a stranger it behooves me, 
a man loyal to the cause, to inquire what 
business you have in the house of a pesti- 
lent toiy, and that, too, late on a stormy 
night." 

The landlord stopped in his progress 
across the room, while a broad smile 
broke over the face of the new comer. 
For a moment he silently contemplated 
the clerk, and then said : 

" My young friend, you have hardly the 
girth of groin or depth of chest to make 
personal demands, unless you can back 
them with something stronger than your 
body. What is my business to you? " 

"It ill becomes you, sir, to slur the 
body God gave me," answered Bent, 
slightly pot valiant and strengthened by 
the thought which had leaped to his brain 
a moment before. " My demand is one 
no honest man need fear and my backing 
what every traitor to the colonies may 
tremble at ! " 

" By my faith ! " ejaculated the stranger, 
turning to the landlord. " Yon fellow is 
a free-booter in politics and hot on the 
trail of both friend and foe. To what 



breed does he belong? At one moment 
he whispers in the ear of a supposed pes- 
tilent tory, taking me to be your Reverend 
Challiss. to beware of a danger, I know 
not what; then by the grace of your ap- 
pearing, he holds aloud for the colonies. 
Take him off ! Is my bed yet ready ? " 

"Your honor must have misunder- 
stood," returned the host of the Oranaug, 
hovering betwixt the fear of offending 
his guest and the result of abetting him, 
at the same time plainly showing astonish- 
ment as he looked at the speaker, " 'twas 
easy to mistake you for the domine ! " he 
concluded. 

" I misunderstood nothing, neither have 
I anything to conceal," returned the guest, 
impatiently, " he did mistake me for the 
domine. I am lately from England and 
am brother — or half brother — to your 
rector. Am I plain? I bear certain 
papers to him. Mistress Hetty — but that 
is beyond the matter — all I would like to 
know is, what danger my brother can be 
threatened with that he must be warned 
against it as I was warned by this young 
man when he mistook me for him." 

" Sir ! " said the landlord, " I was not 
present when he spoke such words of 
warning. I cannot vouch for what he 
said. Master Cyrus has not been long 
among us, but I deem him not double- 
faced. The fact is that your brother is 
to be called upon by the committee of 
inspection to answer to a charge of treason 
to the colonies. Master Cyrus having 
pointed out the tact that he was at home 
at last." 

"And has he been away ? " 

" Nay ; who knows but perhaps the 
young lass of the Cilebe house or her 
father. Withal that he is in danger of the 
tar barrel if he is caught, he seems to go 
and come as he lists yet none can unearth 
his hiding place." 



44 



THE GLEBE HOUSE, 



" The devil you say ! Does this not 
jump with what I was telling you? So 
this same Master Cyrus has discovered 
my brother to your committee and yet he 
Vv^ould warn him." 

" I know naught of the warning, sir, 
'tis hard to believe." And the landlord 
looked from Bent to his guest and back 
again, while the stranger bored the young 
man with a look half angry, half con- 
temptuous. 

While this conversation was going for- 
ward the clerk's mind was in a whirl. He 
had made a tremendous mistake and saw 
it. With the landlord's last implied doubt 
ringing in his ears, he felt however, that 



high — a man who bears papers to a traitor. 
And he has the effrontery to stand there 
and tell you that I warned him — it is 
monstrous — he lies and he knows it." 

He drew a long breath and was about 
to proceed, but was interrupted. The 
new comer took three steps toward his 
traducer and smote him heavily in the 
face with his open palm. Bent staggered 
back until the settle, catching him below 
the knees, tripped him. He fell across it, 
carrying it with him, man and settle going 
to the floor with a crash. Turning on the 
fairly frightened landlord, the stranger 
thundered : 

"And is it thus ye allow a guest to be 




" MAN AND Si^TTi^K (j1j1N(j TU THJi, FI^U(JK WITH A CRASH." 



he might plunge through this self-made 
net by a total denial. His own bare word 
against that of the rector's brother — 
doubtless a tory, also — would be ample 
to clear him. Here, too, was a chance to 
show his patriotic quality, having the 
landlord as a witness to his valor. With 
a somewhat cloudy conception of how to 
start in the right direction, but with a 
tongue which was clear enough and 
seemingly under command, he broke out : 
'' Hard to believe ! It is impossible to 
believe ! Look, Tobey ! If we have missed 
the domine, here is game wellnigh as 



insulted in your house? Be ye in doubt 
as to my word ? Damn such a hostlery ! 
If your bed is no better than your recep- 
tion, my stay with ye will be short enough. 
Show me to my room." 

The host of the Oranaug, mightily im- 
pressed by the commanding air of his 
guest, as well as by his prompt retaliation 
to insult, muttered a stammering apology 
as he took up the candle and led him 
from the room, leaving the man on the 
floor to gather himself together in the 
darkness as best he could. 

( To be continued. ) 




HON. ALFRED K. lU KK, 
(See editorial notes ) 



45 



OUR COLLEGES. 



EDITED BY CRANSTON BRENTON. 



YALE. 

THE present year at Yale promises to 
be one of the most critical in its 
history. ; With a new President at its head, 
confronted by certain changes in its policy 
rendered necessary by recent develop- 
ments, and with plans now under way for 
raising two million dollars to erect the 
memorial buildings which are to com- 
jnemorate Yale's two hundredth anni- 
versary next year, the university has taken 
upon itself responsibilities from which it 
cannot shrink. Whether it has acted for 
the best or not, the present year will de- 
termine, but at New Haven there seems 
to be little doubt but that in twelve 
month's time Yale will hold an even 
higher place among educational institu- 
tions than it did before. 

President Hadley's policy in matters 
pertaining to the administration is de- 
termined by a judicious combination of 
the spirit of progressiveness which is 
essential at the present day to the success 
of any individual or institution, and that 
old Yale spirit of conservatism under 
which the University has always been 
well governed, but which is apt to be a 
little slow in comprehending changes in 
the commercial and professional require- 
ments of the time and the necessity for 
corresponding changes in the preparation 
of the student to meet them. He realizes 
the need of making the University a train- 
ing school for the successful professional 
and business man as well as for the useful 
citizen and American gentleman, in the 
highest sense of the word. He also rea- 
lizes the value of youthful enthusiasm and 
vigor. He is a comparatively young man 
46 



himself, having graduated but thirteen 
years ago. Soon after his election he 
appointed Mr. Anson P. Stokes, then but 
three years out of college, secretary of the 
corporation. And the announcement has 
just been made that Mr. Henry C. Emery, 
a graduate of Bowdoin, in the class of 
1892, has been called to fill the professor- 
ship of political economy, made vacant 
by the advancement of Mr. Hadley to 
the head of the institution. Yet at the 
same time he sees the value of keeping 
clearly in mind the traditions which have 
made Yale through a long period of two 
hundred years the power which it now is. 
His policy was briefly summed up in a 
recent address before the Cleveland 
alumni. Said he : ^' If I were to sum up 
the lines of Yale's development, I should 
say we hope first to have greater co-oper- 
ation between the departments ; second, 
greater co-ordination between the begin- 
ning of the college course and the end 
of the preparatory school life ; third, 
and most important of all, organized 
means of passage from the theoretical 
studies in the class room to the practical 
work of life, and not by supposed practice, 
but by facilitating the connection, with 
actual work, between the school, the shop 
and the office. In so doing we shall work 
slowly in all that is destructive of our old 
methods ; for we have done so well in 
the past that we should distrust the radi- 
cal reformer who would upset too quickly 
things that have proven themselves essen- 
tial in the training of citizens for the de- 
velopment of the country." 

There is not room within the limits of 
this letter to enter into details concern- 



OUR COLLEGES. 



47 



ing the new buildings for which plans 
have been submitted. In general the 
idea is to bring two more city squares, 
north of the present quadrangle, under 
the control of the University for campus 
purposes. This will place the college 
and the scientific school much nearer one 
. another than before and will be another 
step toward making the University a co- 
ordinate and harmonious whole. A new 
dining hall, large enough to fulfill the 
necessities of a university of four thousand 
students ; an auditorium with a seating 
capacity of three thousand ; an elaborate 
hall or vestibule to complete a corner ; a 
new administration building to take the 
place of the old treasury on the campus 
(originally built to hold the famous 
Trumbull collection of portraits) ; and 
another dormitory to be built with the 
funds finally awarded the University after 
the litigation over the Fayerweather be- 
quest, are among the buildings for which 
preparations are being made. The presi- 
dent is now on a tour of the principal 
cities as far west as Denver, arousing 
interest in the plans and stimulating the 
alumni to respond to the appeal for funds. 
On the outcome of this trip will depend 
in great measure the success of the bi- 
centennial celebration in 1901. 

Frederick B. Adams. 



* * 



TRINITY. 

A COMMITTEE, consisting of Colonel 
William C. Skinner, of Hartford, 
George L. Cook, of Providence, and 
Frederick E. Haight, of New York, has 
sent out a circular to the alumni of Trinity, 
asking for contributions to the Samuel 
Hart Library Fund. The committee was 
appointed to draft resolutions expressing 
appreciation by the alumni body of the 
services rendered to the college by Dr. 
Hart, who after thirty years' connection 



with the college as instructor and pro- 
fessor, resigned the chair of Latin last 
year, to become sub-deacon of the Berk- 
eley Divinity School, at Middletown. The 
circular is in part as follows : 

" So many of the alumni have expressed 
the desire that an opportunity might be 
given them to show in a more substantial 
and lasting form their appreciation of 
the great personal service Dr. Hart has 
always exerted to develop Trinity men in 
the line of Christian gentlemen, that your 
committee has decided to raise ^5,000, 
which shall be known as the Samuel 
Hart Library Fund, the income of said 
fund to be used in adding yearly to the 
library of Trinity College, such books, 
manuscripts, etc., as may be selected by 
the Rev. Dr. Hart, or he failing to make 
selection, by the head of the Latin de- 
partment. The fund to be held in trust 
by the trustees of Trinity College." 

During the winter season the only ath- 
letic events of consequence are the games 
of the basketball team. This year's team, 
captained by H. McK. Glazebrook, 1900, 
has done splendidly so far, easily ranking 
among the leading teams in the state. 

The outlook for baseball is bright, as 
only two players graduated in '99. In- 
door work in the ''cage" will begin in 
February. 

Richard E. Peck, 1901, of Bridgeport, 
has been elected manager of the football 
team for the season of 1900. During the 
season recently finished Mr. Peck made 
an excellent assistant manager, and con- 
sequently his election to the managership 
was unanimous. He played on the base- 
ball team in his freshman year. William 
H. Wheeler, 1902, of Little Falls, N. V., 
was elected assistant manager. He is 
manager of his class baseball team, and 
plays on the mandolin club. 

" Trinity Week " promises to be as gay 
as usual. It is an annual custom at 



48 



OUR COLLEGES. 



Trinity to devote the week preceding 
Lent to social functions. The Junior 
ball committee, of which James M. Hud- 
son is chairman and John D. Evans treas- 
urer, has the week in charge. The events 
will include the Junior ball, second Trinity 
german, college tea, Washington's Birth- 
day prize oratorical contest, dramatics, 
and concert by the glee, mandolin and 
banjo clubs. Harry A. Harmor, 1900, is 
stage manager of the Jesters, and Moses 
J. Brines, 1900, is leader of the glee 
club. The mandolin and banjo clubs are 
under the direction respectively of David 
L. Schwartz, 1900, and William Larcher, 
1903. 

Beginning in 1901, the general scien- 
tific course will consist of four year's in- 
stead of three, as at present. This action 
is in line with that taken by the univer- 
sities and larger colleges. At present the 
scientific schedule is so badly crowded 
that the student cannot find time for 
other studies which should form a part of 
the preparation for the degrees, and 
the addition of a freshman year will re- 
move this difficulty. A course in elec- 
trical engineering has been provided for, 
and the scientific laboratories are under- 
going extensive alterations and additions 
for its accommodation. Work in this de- 
partment will be begun next September. 

Several new and valuable scholarships 
have been added during the past year to 
the number now available, about seventy 
in all, ranging from comparatively small 
amounts to the payment of room-rent, 
tuition and other general charges. In the 
way of scholarships the college offers 
exceptional inducements to students. 

The natural history building, work on 
which was begun last June, is rapidly 
nearing completion, and this handsome 
building will add in no small measure to 
the attractiveness of the campus. 



The Michigan alumni of the college 
have effected a permanent organization 
to be known as " The Michigan Alumni 
Association." At the meeting last month 
the following officers were elected : Sid- 
ney T. Miller, '85, president; H. C. 
Loveridge, '80, vice-president ; and Alex- 
ander K. Gage, '96, secretary. Other 
alumni associations have been organized 
since the establishment of the college in 
1823, by graduates in New England, New 
York, Philadelphia, Pittsburgh, " District 
of Columbia and vicinity," California and 
Boston. There is also a '99 alumni as- 
sociation. 

James Albert Wales. 



WESLEYAN. 

The college museum has recently been 
rearranged and generally improved, and 
some rare and valuable collections re- 
catalogued and classified. 

It is not generally known that Wesleyan 
has a most valuable and interesting col- 
lection of New England woods, including 
specimens of two hundred and thirty dif- 
ferent varieties. This had not been cata- 
logued until the past month, but is now 
thoroughly noted and arranged in proper 
groups according to the latest classifica- 
tions. 

During the past few years the interest 
in forestry has led to the establishment in 
many of our colleges of departments de- 
voted exclusively to the study of tree life 
in its broadest application and every year 
many American students go to the Ger- 
man universities to pursue in graduate 
work the lines taken up less exhaustively 
here. 

Wesleyan is particularly fortunate in 
possessing such a valuable collection of 
our native woods and they are of still 
greater interest as being purely limited to 



OVR COLLEGES. 



49 



New England and including many rare 
specimens found in Connecticut. 

The Shaw collection of California woods 
has also been rearranged. 

The most interesting part of the for- 
estry exhibit is a collection of foreign 
woods presented by Mr. Loper, who has 
had the present rearrangement in charge, 
and who has spent many years in making 



this collection, gathering rare and valu 
able specimens from almost all the tropi- 
cal countries of the world. As well as 
being of great interest many of these speci- 
mens are very beautiful, particularly those 
of the leopard wood from the South Sea 
Islands, and of laurel, and zebra wood, 
particularly noted for its markings. 



TO WINTER. 



Its those soft, timid souls that love to lie 

In sunny peace, nor ever feel the thrill 

Of joy in battling with opposing ill 
Set every sluggish life-drop in full cry 
A-coursing through their sodden clay, still sigh 

To see the blighting hoar-frost's early chill 

Bare every shiv'ring branch through vale and hill. 
While soughing winds sob summer sad good-bye. 

But as for me. Old Winter — I love thee, 

I love thy whirling, skirling, stinging storms ; 

I love thy biting, blustering blast that warms 
My soul with its own mighty energy. 

I love thy calm, cold nights and star-gemmed sky, 

Bluff Winter, wassail ! What tho' summer die ! 

-^Horace D. Byrnes, in ''The IVesleyan Literary Monthly: 

T. H. Branden. 





THE HOME. 



BY LOUISE W. BUNCE. 



ENTERTAINMENT, MARKETING AND ECONOMY. 




IT is my purpose in a series 
of articles concerning the 
home, its marketing and 
economy, its entertaining 
and hospitahty, to make 
some suggestions simple 
or elaborate, by which the 
hostess may be aided in 
the entertainment of her 
friends. It has been my 
experience that a certain reciprocity ex- 
isting, so to speak, between kitchen and 
parlor, very considerably greases the 
wheels of housekeeping, so I shall 
give here some menus simple enough to 
be prepared on busy days in the kitchen 
that will not burden the cook, and further 
on others more elaborate, which no hostess 
need feel doubts in offering to a company 
dining with her at home. 

This paper will treat of homes where 
there is one maid for general housework, 
who also takes upon herself the launder- 
ing (I think this arrangement may always 
be accomplished by using judgment). 

Perhaps to fitly illustrate we may make 
a few practical suggestions in such a 
household, beginnmg with Sunday, the 
menu for which has been partially ar- 
ranged the day before. 
50 



The meals will be prepared for four 
persons, as the measuring quantities for 
receipts are more easily remembered and 
a little household arithmetic will easily 
reduce or multiply according to the num- 
ber to be served. 

We will begin then with 

BRKAKFAST. 

(at 8.45 to 9 A, M. ) 

* Grape Fruit. 

** New England Codfish Cakes. *** Fried 

Indian Pudding. 

Radishes or Watercress. Plain Bread. 

****Coffee. 

* Grape Fruit. — Having kept the fruit 
very cold over night cut it equatorially 
just before serving. With a sharp oointed 
knife remove all the seeds and then with 
a silver knife free the fruit cells from the 
pulp without breaking them any. more 
than necessary. Puncture the fruit slightly 
with a fork, sprinkle with fine sugar, pour 
over the sugar one teaspoonful of sherry 
and cover with shaved ice. The ice must 
not be allowed to melt before serving. 
Oranges may be prepared in the same way. 

** Codfish Cakes. — For eight cakes 
take one large cup of shredded codfish to 
two of pared and cut up potatoes. Put 



THE HOME. 



51 



in a small kettle with just enough cold 
water to cover them and boil till the 
mass is thoroughly soft, pour off all the 
water, return to the fire and steam the 
mass dl-y, being careful that none sticks 
to the bottom of the kettle ; beat very 
thoroughly with a spoon or wire potato 
masher, adding a generous desert spoon 
of butter, and if preferred, a little milk — 
this very sparingly, turn out on a bread 
board and mould quickly with very little 
handhng into small cakes. 

Set them away on a board and, this 
having been prepared on Saturday, they 
are ready to fry on Sunday morning in 
salt pork. Fry in enough salt pork to 
prevent burning and not enough to make 
them greasy, and surround them on the 
platter with thin bits of pork. 

***Fried Pudding.— On the day be- 
fore serving stir, into one quart of warm 
water one pint of coarse yellow meal 
gradually ; let it boil, stirring all the time, 
and adding a teacup of wheat flour, stir 
again and then add one and a half pints 
of boihng water and remove to the back 
of the range for two or three hours. This 
mass mitst swell slowly or it will have a 
disagreeable, gritty and uncooked taste 
(much is eaten that is not good, even 
though made after a good receipt, just on 
this account). Mould in a tin brick and 
allow to become absolutely cold. Twenty 
minutes before serving, cut into thin slices 
and fry in very hot lard. On no account 
put this in the oven to "keep warm." 

**** Coffee. — There are as many ways 
of making this simple^ yet difficult bever- 
age as there are stars in the heavens, but 
when the preparation is left from day to 
day in the hands of the cook I think there 
can be no better way than this : Using a 
mixture two-thirds Java and one-third 
Mocha and remembering that poor stock 
will not make good coffee by cooking, 
allow a heaping tablespoon for each per- 



son. If possible have it ground each day. 
Put this quantity in the coffee pot with 
one coffee cup of hot water and a couple 
of egg shells, beat thoroughly with 
a spoon and place on the range, where it 
will come to a boil. When it steams add 
three and a half cups of boiling water, let 
it boil up once and draw it back instantly, 
remembering that all you get in smell 
you lose in taste. If these rules are fol- 
lowed in the order given, I have no doubt 
the verdict will be agreeable. 

This menu will enable the maid to do 
ordinary house work upstairs, after having 
served the family, and go to the ten o'clock 
mass. 

DINNER. 
(at 2:15 to 2:30) 

The maid will find time between twelve 
and this hour to prepare the dinner, which 
may consist of 

* Oyster Cocktail. 

** Soup. Mushrooms on Toast. 

('elery. Cranberry Sauce. Salted Almonds. 

Roast Turkey. Giblct Gravy. 

Browned Mashed Potatoes. Boiled Onions. 

Lettuce Salad. Crackers. 

Wine Jelly. Macaroons. 

* Oyster Cockt.\il. — Allowing si.\ oys- 
ters to each person, put them with a little 
of their liquor in a punch glass, pour over 
them carefully so the seasoning may re- 
main in layers, one teaspoon of vinegar, 
one of tomato catsup (scant), one of 
horse-radish, a squeeze of lemon and a 
drop of tobasco to each glass. Serve very 
cold. 

** Soup. — I give a receipt for soup 
stock taken from my own experience and 
as by putting it away in a cool place it 
will keep easily a week (and should last 
as long as that with daily calls upon it) ; 
it will be found ever ready to use with 
the simple additions required for variety. 
Quantities — three pounds of " bottom 
round " of beef, a beef shank ;md a 



52 



THE HOME. 



knuckle of veal, about six pounds in all. 
The beef gives the stronger and the veal 
the gelatinous quality to the stock ; do 
not remove the marrow from the beef 
shank as that amount of fat will form a 
cover over the stock when done and can 
be easily removed when cold. Boil beef 
and veal together in cold water enough 
to cover at first, adding boiling water 
from time to time to keep covered, as the 
liquid boils away, which boiling should 
not at any time be violent as the meat 
would be wasted. At the first boiling, 
skim carefully and repeat as often as is 
necessary to remove all brown matter ris- 
ing to the top. Continue the boiling till 
the bones are free of fat and muscle, take 
out bones and pour the liquid off into 
an earthen bowl. When cold it should 
be of the consistency of firm jelly ; cut 
out a piece as required, removing the 
fat from the piece used only. A variety 
of flavors may now be made, as for ex- 
ample : by adding a half a can of tomatoes 
stewed to a pint of stock a tomato soup 
may be served ; a celery soup by boiling 
the unused parts of the ordinary bunch 
served on the table ; a consomme by the 
addition of a little macaroni ; a cream of 
onion, cauliflower or bouquet of fine herbs. 
For the taste of most persons a Httle thick- 
ening is required, as blended flour, a half 
teacup to one quart of soup, or blended 
cornstarch, a tablespoon for a quart ; this 
latter makes a translucent soup. If onion 
is liked, a single medium sized onion is 
an improvement to all stock soups ; if a 
cloudy look is desired, chop up very fine 
some of the shreds of meat in the bottom 
of the crock and add at the last. Salt, 
pepper or paprika and celery, salt may be 
added at discretion, also two or three 
whole cloves or two tablespoons of tomato 
capsup to vary the flavor. 

*** Mushrooms on Toast. — Blanch the 
fresh mushroom in lemon and water for 



twenty minutes, then remove all dark 
skin. While the soup in the menu is be- 
ing partaken of these should be cooked, 
toasting them first stem side down and 
then reversing them and putting in a flake 
of butter and pepper and salt in each cup 
just toast them stem up. Serve on indi- 
vidual pieces of buttered and slightly 
moistened toast, very hot. 

Sunday evening suggests the chafing 
dish, as the meal may be prepared more 
socially and for guests who may drop in 
informally, as guests should, Sunday even- 
ing. This event gives " satiety " a new 
appetite and enables the hostess, with- 
out burdening the maid, or yet enslaving 
herself, to serve an attractive repast. The 
season of the year suggests hot things, so 
we will serve : 

* Poulette Oysters. 

Dry Toast. Olives. 

Pound Cake. Brandy Peaches. 

* Poulette Oysters. — For a pint of 
blue point oysters blend a tablespoon of 
flour and two of water till perfectly smooth, 
stir in a half cup of milk. Pour this dress- 
ing into the chafing dish, season with a 
generous lump of butter and a pinch of 
salt and let it come to a boil, stirring con- 
stantly. When of the consistency of rich 
cream pour in the oysters with their 
liquor and cook tifl the oysters "frill," 
season with a little white pepper and 
serve immediately on toast. Anything 
cooked in a chafing dish must be con- 
stantly stirred, as the proximity to the 
alcohol flame will make a scorched dress- 
ing if allowed to cook without care. 

During the " week days," so called, 
each housewife must arrange the timing 
of meals for her individual case, but I 
find that it makes no more work, but on 
the contrary, leaves more time in which 
to accomplish it, to serve luncheons at 
noon and dinners at night. There is 



THE HOME, 



53 



greater economy in it, and that is one 
of the points under consideration, for 
attractive dishes may be served, made of 
the left-overs so dear to the heart of an 
accompHshed cook, and so exceedingly 
palatable, and as a matter of the chemistry 
of the body certainly the hearty meal 
and the hour of relaxation should go hand 
in hand. 

BREAKFAST. 

Oranges. 

Eggs Scrambled with finely Chopped Ham. 

* English MujBfins. Radishes. 

Coffee. 

* Make a batter of one pint of milk, 
one-half a yeast cake, sufficient flour to 
make it thick enough to run from the 
spoon. Raise over night and if too thick 
in the morning add a little lukewarm 
milk. Never add flour to a raised thing 
that has not itself been raised. Bake in 
greased muffin rings on a frying pan and 
serve. Very good ! 

LUNCHEON. 

* Tomato Toast. Shaved Smoked Beef. 

Preserved Plums. Toasted Snow Flakes. 

. Cheese. Tea. 

* Tomato Toast, also called '* Epi- 
curean." — Pour a little tomato catsup into 
a porcelain saucepan, which immerse in 
one larger, containing boiling water. 
Thoroughly heat, but not boil, and ^erve 
on hot toast. ^ 

DINNER. 

Vegetable Soup. 

Broiled Beefsteak. Chow Chow. 

Empress Potatoes. 



Cranberry Tart. Toasted Cheese on 

Crackers. 

Coffee. 

BREAKFAST. 

Oatmeal, with Sugar and Cream. Corned 

Beef Hash. 

Buckwheat Cakes. Maple Syrup. 

Coffee. 

LUNCHEON. 

*Toasted English Muffins. Turkey Salad. 
Chocolate. Cookies. 

* Toasted Muffins. Use any muffins 
left from breakfast ; split ihem and butter 
well, then toast and serve hot with the 
butter melted all through them. 

DINNER. 

Beef Stock Soup, with Vegetable Bouquet. 

Roast Spare Rib of Pork. Apple Sauce. 

Mashed Turnips. Potatoes Baked 

in Jackets. 

Brown Betty. Rum Sauce. 

Coffee. 

While it is not my idea that these menus 
should be followed necessarily verbatim, 
they may suggest forgotten or untried 
viands which relieve the sameness of a 
hostess' planning. With a little assist- 
ance and thought upon the housekeeper's 
part they may be accomplished by one 
maid, while, should there be a second 
maid, her part in the duties will at once. 
I think, suggest itself. 

Another paper will discuss other mat- 
ters concerning the home. 

( To be Continued. ^ 




EDITORIAL NOTES. 



CONNECTICUT 



MAGAZINE. 



THE With the present num- 

ber The Connecticut 
Magazine enters upon 
its sixth year happy in 
the knowledge that it is 
rapidly widening its circle of readers. This 
is evidenced by the subscriptions that con- 
tinue to come in with every mail from 
all sections of the state and from every 
part of the United States wherever a 
daughter or son of Connecticut lives. 
And hundreds of renewals of subscriptions 
are received every week. All this is grati- 
fying. No greater incentive to effort, no 
larger meed of encouragement can be 
offered than the loyalty of old friends and 
patrons in sending the renewal of their 
subscription. For such generous support 
and good-will The Connecticut Maga- 
zine expresses its most sincere apprecia- 
tion. 

Just here we have something we wish 
to say to our readers as to what we are 
and wherefore our mission. The Connec- 
ticut Magazine exists for a purpose. It 
is not an idle scheme to make money. 
Nor is its sole purpose to simply amuse. 
It feels, and it knows it to be true, that it 
has a serious, yet pleasant duty to per- 
form — the uplifting influence as exempli- 
fied in the splendid record of the press 
of the state; that is the duty — to be 
good and faithful for all that is ennobling 
in the Hfe of the commonwealth. 



non-professional Many of the most 

writers. valuable contribu- 

tors to the current 
magazines belong to 
that larger and rapidly increasing body of 
writers who only at occasional moments 
take upon themselves the work of writing 
for publication. This class of literary 
contributions possess a value equal in its 
way to the more trained, more perfect 
technique, that obtains in the productions 
of professional writers. We like to turn 
for a moment from the brilliancy and 
cold-blooded self-assurance of the profes- 
sional writer to that of the more simple, 
warm and, it might be added, more sin- 
cere expression of the broad-minded and 
cultured layman. The charm of such 
writing consists in the personality of the 
author. We know that he lives and 
moves among us ; that he is onre of the 
everyday people whom we meet; that 
he speaks to us in a natural voice, the 
unaffected utterance of the home circle 
gathered together to discuss in polite and 
frank terms the questions of the day. 
We feel that he is speaking to us as one 
with authority, a title inherent by right of 
training, occupation and environment. 
We know that what he writes is from per- 
sonal experience of active participation 
in the incidents he portrays — the positive 
position of one whose narrative rests upon 
facts of which he himself is largely an 



54 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



55 



important part, rather than the negative 
point of one who writes from hearsay or 
observation, keen though this power may 
be. Such writing is in itself something 
to be valued aside from its local interest, 
since it must, with the lapse of time, 
afford the future commentator on social 
science a larger, and in many instances, 
truer index to the customs, activities and 
ideals of the period with which it treats 
than can be hoped for from the studied, 
albeit brilliant, pens of professional writers. 
It is by no means contended here that 
the layman, however cultured he may be, 
can depict an occurrence with the same 
perspicuity and fidelity of detail that the 
more trained professional writer of the 
highest class is able to do, but what is 
claimed is that the best non-professional 
writing possesses as much, if not more, 
value than the average professional writ- 
ing, and, such being the case, such non- 
professional writers should be sought out 
and induced to put their thoughts down 
in the more endurable form of printed 
words. It is the aim of the editor of The 
Connecticut Magazine to bring to light 
just such writers as these ; at the same 
time he extends the most cordial welcome 
to those who make writing a business. 



begin the work of pumping water from 
the river. 

There are individuals rash enough to 
insinuate that the Honorable Board of 
Water Commissioners have overslept 
themselves and permitted a dangerous 
situation to c«reep in on them unawares. 
Why were not the pumps started months 
ago? Why were not the gates leading 
from at least two of the reservoirs closed 
and their contents held in storage to meet 
just such grave emergencies as that which 
now confronts the city? Why didn't 
somebody keep awake when it was made 
manifest that the water supply was being 
swallowed up and so give the alarm? 
Why were not all these things attended 
to? Our esteemed querist is respectfully 
referred to the somnambulic water com- 
missioners for information. They ought 
to know. 

Happily there is, thanks to great good 
fortune and the admirable promptness 
and generosity on the part of Hartford's 
leading street railway company in lending 
the city the free use of one of its motors 
to furnish power at the pumping station, 
no great danger of serious consequences 
arising from the shortage of the water 
supply. 



EMPTY 
RESERVOIRS. 



* * 



HARTFORD'S The story of Hartford's 

empty reservoirs must oc- 
casion much comment of 
a more or less humiliating 
character among her sister 
cities. There will be some people ex- 
asperating enough to inquire who is 
responsible for a state of affairs that per- 
mitted all the reservoirs but one (and 
that one is very low) to run practically 
dry, and then, after the situation had 
reached its last stage of seriousness to 



THE ACME 

OF 
FLIPPANCY. 



Press dispatches inform 
us that on Christmas day 
shells containing plum-pud- 
ding and the compliments 
of the season were fired 
from the Boer guns into Ladysmith. And 
this is war ! Making sport while thous- 
ands of hearts in distant homes are 
aching, sinking, in the throes of despair ! 
It would seem that the acme of tlippancy 
was reached when a body of men could 
be found to engage in such miserable 
business. Plum-|nidding and shells ! The 
mockery of it sickens the heart ! 



56 



-^ 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



HON. The late Hon. Alfred Ed- 

ALFRED E. mund Burr, editor of the 
gyj^j^ ^'Hartford Times," whose 

portrait we give elsewhere, 
was one of the best public 
men the state of Connecticut ever pro 
duced. The news of his death has occa- 
sioned wide-spread sorrow among all 
classes of citizens in Hartford, his native 
city, and throughout the state. 

The press in Connecticut, and indeed 
all over the country, has been unstinted 
in its praise of Hartford's indefatigable 
worker, the great editor, the public- 
spirited citizen and the man, and one 
and all have given expression to senti- 
ments of profound sorrow on learning of 
his death. There is one phase of his 
character that stands out in bold relief, a 
splendid example of the ideal in civic 
life, and that is the absolute integrity and 
faithfulness that governed him in all trans- 
actions involving the expenditure of 
public funds. No man has been more 
conscientious and watchful in the matter 
of thorough correctness of accounts in 
the disbursement of state moneys : none 
have been more inflexible in demanding 
a just return for money expended. It is 
due to Alfred E. Burr, more than to any 



one man that the people of Connecticut 
owe the completion of the Capitol build- 
ing within the appropriation made for it. 
As Chairman of the State Capitol Com- 
missioners, some three millions of dollars 
passed under his control, and of all that 
money not one dollar has been wrong- 
fully or carelessly spent. Political plun- 
derers who flock in scores wherever there 
is money to be expended upon public im- 
provements were met here by a deter- 
mined and honest man, who stood as a 
stone wall against every attempt to involve 
the Building Commission in unnecessary, 
not to say unlawful, expenditure of the 
funds entrusted to its care. Watchful, 
even to the point of anxiety, he let no 
dishonest account creep in and the result 
is a magnificent civic building, costing 
three millions of dollars, all completed 
within the appropriations originally made 
for it, a circumstance that has occasioned 
the wonder and envy of every state in the 
Union. 

In the death of Mr. Burr the Connecti- 
cut democracy loses a steadfast and 
sagacious leader, the state a faithful and 
obliging servant, and the immediate com- 
munity in which he lived a kind and 
thoughtful man. 




©g^g^iLigOa 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Querists are requested to write all names of persons and places so that they cannot 
be misunderstood, to write on only one side of the paper, to enclose a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope, and ten cents in stamps for each query. Those who are subscribers 
will be given preference in the insertion of their queries and they will be inserted in the 
order in which they are received. All matters relating to this department must be sent 
to The Connecticut Magazine, Hartford, marked Genealogical Department. Give 
full name and post office address. 

It is optional with querist to have name and address or initials published. 



ANSWERS. 

To No. 117 (b) — Risky — John Risley, 
wife Mary Arnold, dau. of Henry and 
Elizabeth (Colfax) Arnold. Children: 
John, Elizabeth m. (McLean), Hannah 
m. (Van Lout), Mabel m. (Webster), 

Thankful m. (Deming), Martha m. ( 

Elmer), Timothy. E. S. F. 

To No. 117 (c) — Foster — Abraham 
Foster, b. June 11, 1696, was probably 
son of John and Hannah (Abbott) Foster 
and gt. gr. son of Christopher Foster, 
who removed from Lynn, Mass., to South- 
ampton, L. I., 1 65 1. H. W. B. 

QUERIES. 

I. Phelps-Goodhue — Benjamin Phelps 
married Elizabeth Goodhue. Both 
lived in what is now North Canton^ 
then Simsbury. Both are buried in the 
North Canton burying ground. When, 
where and by whom were they married, 
and who were their parents ? 

E. S. F. 



2. Williams-Lestor — Who was the 
father of Priscilla Williams, wife of 
Daniel Lestor, of Stonington, Conn. 
She was married May 17, 1738. 

Mrs. J. L. Onerhiser, 
So. Framingham, Mass. 

3. Merwin — Who was the wife of 
Thomas, son of Miles Merwin ist, of 
Milford, Conn., who went to Norwalk 
as early as 1682 ? Also, names of their 
children wanted. 

Mrs. Andrew M. Joys, 
209 Mason St., Milwaukee, Wis. 

4. Smith-Spalding — Philip Smith, b. 
1773, at Rehobath, Mass., m. June 25, 
1795, Anna Spalding, dau. of Philip 
Spalding, of Plainfield, Conn. Was he 
either Philip Spalding or Philip Spald- 
ing, Jr., both of whom served in the 
Revolution and were from Plaintiekl. 
Conn. D. C. 

5. B i dive 11- y ones — Wanted, the an- 
cestors of Elizabeth Bidwell, who m;u- 



57 



58 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



ried at Bolton, Conn., June 19, 1760, 
Nathan Jones. 

Nathan H. Jones, 
Plattsburgh, N. Y. 

6. Swift-Hale — Chipman Swift, of Le- 
banon, Conn., b. May, 1750, married 
1770, Mary Hale. Who were their 
children and whom did they marry? 

7. Gridley- Curtis — Wanted, the an- 
cestry of Elnathan Gridley and Sarah 
Gridley, whose dau. Hannah m. Eleazer 
Curtis, of Berlin, Conn. 

G. H. T. 

8. {a) Ripley- Carey — David Ripley, 
the great-grandson of Governor William 
Bradford, m. Lydia, dau. of Eliezer 
Carey, of Windham, Conn. She was 
born in Bristol, R. I. Who were the 
parents of Eliezer Carey? 

{b) Gould — William Gould moved 
from Milford, Conn., to New Milford, 
in 1 717. Died Feb. 18, 1730. Who 
were his parents? 

{c') Prindle — Samuel Prindle lived in 
New Milford, being one of the original 
purchasers of the town. He died Sept. 
20,1750. Who were his prrents ? 

. C. P. 

9. Dye — Wanted, parentage, name of 
wife, date of birth, etc., of Peter 
Dye, who was in Capt. Slapp's Co., 
from Stonington, in the French and 
Indian war in 1755, and was in Ston- 
ington in 1780, where his son Daniel 
was born in that year. Wanted, names 
of other children. T. M. B. 



10. {a) Skinner- Williams — W h o s e 
daughter was Mary Skinner, who mar- 
ried Judah Williams, of Colchester, 
Westchester and Williamstown ? Date 
of marriage ? 

{b) Latham-Avery — Date of birth of 
Lucy Latham, who married Col. Eben- 
ezer Avery ? 

(r) Tyler — ^Name of wife of WiUiam 
Tyler, of Milford and Wallingford? 
Their daughter Bethiah married John 
Watson, of Hartford. 

(^) Parker-Stevens — Parents of Dor- 
othy Parker, wife of Thomas Stevens, of 
Killingworth ? 

(^) Proctor-Douglas — Parents of Sarah 
Proctor, wife of William Douglas ? 

(/) B r own- Hawkins— VdiXentdige of 
Isabel Brown, first wife of Anthony 
Hawkins (Howkins) ? Was she dau. 
of Peter Brown, of the Mayflower? 

{g) Gardner- Colton — Parents of De- 
borah Gardner, of Hartford, first wife 
of Quartermaster George Colton ? 

A. D. P. 

1 1 . Dickinson-Bancroft — Will the gentle- 
man who called at the office of The 
Connecticut Magazine, and gave the 
marriage of Obadiah Dickinson to Han- 
nah Bancroft, and who said he was a 
grandson of Abner Bancroft, kindly 
send his name and post office address 
to the editor of The Connecticut Mag- 
azine, Hartford, Conn., as the party 
whose query he answered, wishes to 
write him or will call and see him. 





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write to-day and we will send the Tablets by mail postpaid. When sold, send us the monr-y ami 
we will send four Sash Curtams, unhemmed, so they may be made to fit any window toiffther 
with our offer of two C9mplete pairs of Royal Lace Parlor Curtains, enough to fumisii a rrx.m 
same day money is received. This is a grand opportunity for ladies to bf^utify their homes with 
fine Lace Curtains of exquisite design. All who have earned them are del ghted Address- 

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Sufferer a from 
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find this an Ideal 
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The large, handsome house is very cheerful, airy, newly 
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the grounds, and on all sides are beauty and quiet. The 
pure spring water is plentiful, and the air invigorating. The 
drives in all directions are unsurpassed. References from 
patients cured and other information will be cheerfully given, 
on request. Address, Dr. P. D. Peltier, Hartford, Conn. 



^rANT REN [3 EM piNS self threading 

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Needle joints, black or wbite, worib a 
dozen papers of other pin« for collars and 
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WANTED. Families to write us for 

free illustrated catalogue 

of GOOD THINGS FOR HOUSEKEEPERS. 

SHUMWAY CO., 



10 Center St. 
New Haven, Conn. 



Waverly Bldg., 731 Main St 
Hartford, Coon. 



AUCTIONS 



in all pr rts of 
Connecticut. 



Sales conducted throughout the state on Real 
Estate, Land Plots, Farms, Live Stock, Store 
Stocks, Furniture, Art Sales, etc. Write me 
if you wish to sell. 



Howard C. Bestor, 



Hartford, Ct. 



HISHOLINESS POPE LEO XIII 
AWAROS GOLD MEDAL 

In t^eco Jnition of Benefits Received from 




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Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



The Connecticut Agricultural College* 

" Ignorance is the curse of God, 

Knowledge the wing wherewith we fly to heaven." 

One writer has said, '' The college is a bond which joins the present to the past. For us 
ancestry has labored. Ignorance supports iniquitous and oppressive political systems. Popular 
education, inspired by the college, is the one invincible foe of special privilege and political 
absolution. Liberal culture not only proclaims republican equality, but works out the practical 
elevation of the lowly. 



X. 




^-r-c Self-government is a 
government by a nation 
of readers, thinkers, and 
debaters." 

In these terse sen- 
tences will be found the 
object in full for which 
The Connecticut Argri- 
cultural College has been 
founded by the state, to 
which, at any time, all 
students of both sexes 
over fifteen years of age 
are admitted to such 
classes as they are found 
qualified to enter. 




HEAD SEPAKATORS. 



The tall term will close Wednesday, December 20th, followed by the holiday recess till 
January 2, 1900. A short course in Dairying will be given, including such subjects as Feeding 
Animals, Butter Making, Breeds and Breeding, Selection of the Dairy Cow, Milk-Testing, 
Pasteurization, &c. 

FOR INFORMATION AND CATALOGUES, 

Address GEORGE W. FLINT, President, Storrs, Conn 



Please mention The CoNNEcncuT Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



n 



ONCE USED ALWAYS USED ^5 time to turn overa 

^58SM1TH PREMIER ■ s;S'"^"' 

PREMIER 




>DE5I0nER^ 



^xru4Ay: 



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/sorts' 



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TAtfC ELEVATOff. 



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PRESERVE 
X2MQUARTERLIES 

They will make a valuable addition to 
your library when they arc bound. 

WK BIND THKM in Russia Rack and Comers, 
Raised Bands, with M.uble Paper Sides. $i.oo 

Per Volume of one year. 

In Turkey Morocco Hack and Comers, as above. $t.»5 

All kinds and qualities of Magarine Binding. 

Blank Books of cver\- description with tiat oj^nini; b.»cks. 

The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co., 

H.\KTFOKl>, («>\N. 



Please mention The ConnecticTT Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



PUBLISHERS' NOTES. 



Beginning with the present number there 
will be a new department added to the 
Connecticut Magazine devoted exclusively to 
the colleges of the state. A full page every 
month will be devoted to each institution. 
The articles will be appropriately illustrated 
and will consist of descriptions of new build- 
ings, athletic teams, individual students of 
prominence, general college news, in fact 
of anything of conspicuous interest. The 
department is in charge of an alumnus of one 
of our colleges, who was for some time editor- 
in-chief of one of the prominent college maga- 
zines, and who is familiar with collegiate 
journalism. The articles published will be 
sent direct from the colleges by special cor- 
respondents, and will, for the most part, be 
of the nature of signed communications. 
This means up-to-date matter, written by 
competent undergraduates who are person- 
ally in touch with what they write of. The 
correspondents secured from Yale and Trinity 
are present managing editors of influential 
publications, and thus our readers will have 
the advantage of the work of men thoroughly 
trained in literary and journalistic study. 
From time to time selected fragments of rep- 
resentative verse will be published, taken 
from the college magazines. We hope by 
these features to furnish a department which 
will serve somewhat as a combined college 
publication, and one of interest to the general 
reader and to the college students themselves. 

The publishers desire to call attention to 
the department under the title " The Home," 
that begins with the present number. This 
new feature will appear in each issue for the 
year and will be under the editorship of Miss 
Louise W. Bunce, a lady well known in Hart- 
ford society. It is designed to make this 
department of great value in all that apper- 
tains to the science of housekeeping in its 
various phases of entertainment, economy 
and marketing. 

We will give a year's subscription to the 
Connecticut Magazine to anyone sending us 
five new subscriptions. 

It will interest our advertisers to know 
the names of the judges who will decide the 
Advertisers' Contest that appeared in our 
Christmas issue. They are as follows : Miss 
Kate E. Griswold, publisher of Profitable 
Advertising, Boston ; Mr. J. Roland Mix, 
advertising manager of Scribner's, and Mr. 
Krnest F. Birmingham, publisher of The 
Fourth Estate. The judges will meet this 
month in New York, and the awards will be 
announced in our February issue. 

Our readers may expect the Connecticut 
Magazine hereafter promptly on the 15th of 
each month. We publish on the 15th pur- 

TO CUKE A COLD IN ONE DAY. 

Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets. 
All druggists refund the money if it fails 
to cure. 25 cents. 



posely to be out of the great crush of maga- 
zines and periodicals that flood the market on 
the first of the month — and we believe our 
readers will appreciate the Connecticut Maga- 
zine more coming as it does when there is a 
visible scarcity of reading matter of this kind. 

The removal of the engraving department 
into larger quarters necessitating the tearing 
down of partitions and rebuilding has occa- 
sioned delay in all the departments and we 
are late in appearing this month. The office 
of the Magazine also has been moved to 
commodious quarters on the same floor. 
With this explanation we trust our readers 
and advertisers will understand that we are 
in position now to appear promptly on the 
15th of the month hereafter as stated above. 

" The Leading Fire Insurance Company of America. " 




Wi>I. B CLAKK, President. 

W. H. KING, Secretary. E, O. WEEKS, Vice-President 

A. C. ADAMS, HENRY E. EEES, Assistant Secretaries. 

THE 

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carries the Largest 
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Harvey & L.ewig, Opticians, 

865 Main St , Hartford, Conn. 



PHOTOGRAPniC 
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Please mention Thej Connecticut Magazine; when you write to advertisers. 



WHAT SHALL WE DO? 

FOR ANSWER SEE OUR GRAND COI.I.ECTION OF ENTERTAINMENTS. Copies should 
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has been oflRcially acrf-ptedfrir use through- 
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Please mention The Connecticut M-\g.\zine ^vhen you write to advertisers. 




FOR SELLING OUR JEWELRY NOVELTIES. 

Watches, Cameras, Bracelets, Gold Rings, 

given away ABS01L,UTE1L.Y FKEE for selling our 

Jeweiry. >lo money required. Send us your name 
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MSXJFFERBRS FROM 
ORPHINE^ 
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Can be permanently cured at their homes ^vitlH>nt pain publicity or »^*;*»:'\tio" fyoj'J >;»;-«"';-;--^; N^^^ humVn^lT'S 
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What a fe7u of 0H>- patients say : ♦' Suinplc just BOiic ; It ts tw« weeks «liu'0 1 have t.Mioho.l Iht drns. 
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WHO Has caiarrh? 

A CMMIM-SEIISE CniE 

TO those who know what Catarrh 
really is, the old-fashioned way 
of treating it, still used by 
thousands who cling to old 
methods, seems a woeful waste of 
good energy. 

Catarrh is inflammation of the 
mucous membranes of the nostrils, 
throat and air passages. 
It needs soothing, not irritating. 
The constant hawking, the chok- 
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sation of tightness — troublesome 
especially in the early morning, 
when the cold air contracts the air 
passages and irritates the inflamed 
membranes — ^is reheved immediate- 
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OZOJELL 

Ozojell is like a healing ointment applied to a troublesome and angry 
sore — it Soothes, Relieves, Cures. 

The catarrhal discharge is like the pus from a running sore, and 
everyone knows that washing a sore is not sufficient to make it /lea/. 

Ozojell, a delicious, pleasant emulsion or jelly of great cleansing, 
healing, preservative, germicidal properties, when once applied, remains 
on the raw membranes and gradually draws out the matter and heals up 
the wound by promoting the growth of new, healthy membrane. 

Ozojell is put up in a patent Ozojell tube, easily carried in the pocket, 
easily applied to the parts as needed, in the office, on the street, without 
attracting attention, and with no irritation, trouble or waste of time. 

It is sold by all druggists in 50 cent patent Ozojell nasal tubes. 

Prepared from the formula of the celebrated Vienna physician, Herr 
J. Muller, the great speciaUst in diseases of the ear, throat and nose 
(Physician in Ordinary to the Emperor of Austria). 

Thousands of letters from those who have been cured attest its virtues. 

TO PROVE 

its efficacy, we offer to send/r^^ by mail to all readers of this paper a tube 
of Ozojell and a book on Catarrh and Its Scientific Treatment. 

Simply write, giving name and full address, when this treatment will 
be sent you absolutely free, postage paid. Address 

OZOJELL CURE, 465 Temple Court, New York. 



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* THE MAN WITH THE HOE *' 




should be " up-to-date " in matters relating to the farm. A 
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The Connecticut Farmer does this, paving more 
particular attention to the needs of the farmers of this, state. 

Our Tobacco Department gives a complete resume of all 
the news of interest to the tobacco grower, also many 
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We have a very complete Grange page, giving the 
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Our subscription price is only $1.00 a year, free for the 
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of three months. 25 cents. A postal will bring you a sample 
copy. 




HARTFORD, CONN. 



No 

Matter 

What 



your politics may be youll laugh to 
** split your sides *' over JUDGE during 
the campaign of J 900. JUDGE has 
politics in pictures for tfae politician, 
humor for the humorist, and all-aroand 
good-natured satire for everybody. 
JUDGE'S cartoons are features of every 
political contest that a good American 
should not miss* 

JUDGE is published weekly and a 
to be found the world over. It is sold 
at 10 cents per copy, or by the year 
at $5.00. 

Remember, please, that 

Judge is 
the Prince of 
Caricaturists 



The 
We 
We 



Readers 
have- 
hold! 



This is an age of education. No other nation on the 
face of the globe is so intelligent as ours, and 
intelligence makes a nation prosperous and 
happy. Education gives a young man the best 
chance in life. The easiest and cheapest way to 
educate yourself and your children, irrespective of 
the schools and colleges^ is by having the best 
current reading in your house. 



THE GREATEST FAMILY NEWSPAPER 15 



Leslie's Illustrated Weekly. 

It tells the story of contemporaneous events and illustrates it with the most 
artistic pictures. He who reads it every week learns to recognize the counte- 
nances of the noblest men and women in public and 
in private life; the appearance of the world's most 
famous places, and the scenes of the greatest historic 
interest. 
~^ LESLIE'S "WEEKLY is a paper to keep on the 

library table, and to read and reread, and to file away 
for useful reference. It is read by more families of 
culture and refinement among the masses than any 
other paper of its class in the world. It is the greatest, 
best, most attractive and cheapest of all American 
educators. 

It is for sale everywhere — on the stands, in the 
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LESLIE'S WEEKLY, no Fifth Avenue, New York. 




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Little Shavers and Bi^ ShaVCFS 

in every land and clime, have for generations found delight in WILLIAMS' SHAVING 
SOAPS. For Richness and Creaminess of Lather, the softening action on he beard, and 
the soothing refreshing effect upon the face — Williams' Shaving Soaps are simply matchless. 
Williams' Shaving Soaps are used by all Jirst-class barbers and are sold I'verrubere. 



Williams' Shaving Stick, 25 cts. Luxury 5havlng: TaMet, 25 cts. 

Genuine Yankee :?having Soap, 10 cts. White Glycerine vToilet^, 10 c s. 

Williams' Shaving Soap, (Barbers'), (> round cakes. 1 lb., 40 cts Fxiiuisito .ilso for Toilet. 
Tablet for 2-ccnt stamp. By mail if your dealer docs not supply you. 



Trial 



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Dresden. 
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jnst because of your lacls; of a practical 
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370 Asylum Street, HARTFOKD, CONN. 



PADEREWSKI 




AND ALL THE GREATEST ARTISTS 

USE THE 
STEINWAY PIANO. 

WM. WANDER & SONS, 

SOLE REPRESENTATIVES. 



241 ASYLUM STREET, 



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Dames, 

GIVEN AWAY. 

This exquisite calendar consists of four 
separate pictures lithographed in several 
colors on fine bristol-board. Underneath 
each picture are three calendar months. 
These pictures represent the four original 
colonies,— Massachusetts, New York, 
Pennsylvania and Virginia,— and on the 
back of each is a condensed history of ,, 
that colony. 

This beautiful work is copyrighted, 
and cannot be purchased at any store 
or elsewhere. To each of our patrons 
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on receipt of three shell trade-mark de- 
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would be sure of getting one send at 
once. " First come, first served." 

BAKER EXTRACT CO., Springfield, Mass 



((. 



Serial Story THE GLEBE HOUSE" 

By Chauncey C. Hotchkiss. 



Vol. VI. 



February, 1900. 



No. 2. 



THE 



CONNECTICUT 
MAGA 



H o 







AN ILLVSTRATED 
i^ONTHLY 



AV£T*^. 



ILLUSTRATED ARTICLES 

IN THIS NUMBER. 




n 




j^W jj* 4^ 

The City of Rockville. 
James Gates PercivaL 

(Two Papers) . 

Forty-Five Miles to 

New London. 

The Glebe House— 
St. Valentine's. Poem. 
Our Colle§:es. 

Etc., Etc. 

t^ t^ •»* 

See Contents on Second Pa8:c 



M s 




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Paid up Capital $1000,000.00 



RAYELERS 



NSURANCE 



^ A "^ HARTFORD, 

ALL CONN. 

JAMES G.BATTERSON, PRESIDENT 



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INSURE 
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THE T ravelers, 



OF HARTFORD CONN. 



OLDEST, 
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AND BEST. 



LIFE ENDOWMENT, and 

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Owners cf Buildings, Horses, and Vehicles, can all be protected by policies 
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PIIID-OP CASH CIIPIIllL $1,000,000.00 
ASSETS, 26,499,822,74 



LiflBiLiiiEs, . . mmmM 

EXCESS, i'A^ BASIS. W9I.IM 



GAINS: 6 Months, January to July, 1899. 
In Assets, $1,184,380.28 Increase in Reserves (both depts), $1,478,.549.62 



S. C. DUNHAM Vice-President. H J. MESSENGER Actuary. 

JOHN E. MORRIS Secretary. £. V. PRESTON, Sup-t of Agencies. 






riea.sc mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



THE 



Connecticut Magazine 



AN ILLUSTRATED MONTHLY. 

Devoted to Connecticut in its various phases of History > Literature, 
Picturesque Features, Science, Art and Industries. 



FEBRUARY, 1900. 



Vol. VI. 



CONTENTS. 



No. 2. 



James Gates Percival. Portrait. 

The City of Rockville. Illustrated. 

Hartford to New London, Forty-five Miles. Illustrated. 

James Gates Percival. First Paper. Illustrated. 

Evening of Life. Poem. 

James Gates Percival. Second Paper. Illustrated. 

Dawn. Poem. 

The Glebe House. Serial Story. Illustrated. 

St. Valentine*s. Poem. Illustrated. 

Lieutenant Ward Cheney. 

Departments. — The Home. 

Our Colleges. 

Connecticut People Who Interest Us. 

Historical Notes. 

Genealogical Department. 

Editorial Notes. 

Book Notes and Reviews. 



(Frontispii 


ECE.) 


B. Le7vellyn Burr. 


61 


W. H. C. Pynchon. 


75 


Rev. Magee Pratt. 


81 


H. Phelps Arms. 


85 


Pev. C. A. Wight. 


87 


Florence Folsom. 


112 


Chauncey C. Hotchkiss. 


93 


Elizabeth Alden Curtis. 


99 


Thomas Snell Weaver. 


101 


Edited bv Louise W. Bunce. 


.102 


Edited by Cranston Brenton. 


105 




109 




HO 




104 




116 




Vll 



H. Phelps Arms, Editor. 



Edward B. Baton, Baslness Manager. 



All communications should be addressed to The Connecticut Magazine, Ilartiord, (.'onii. Keniilt«n«s 
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Published at 66 State St., Hartford, Conn, by The Connecticut Magaiine Co. 
COPYRIGHT 1900, BY THE CONNECTICUT M.\C..\/.INE CO. 



Entered at the Post Office at Hartford, Conn, as mail matter of the aecond-cli 




Cbe Standard 



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Of any school of music can best 
be judged by its corps of instruc- 
tors. The Faculty of the 

Bartfora Conserwtory of*«* 
music ana Zu\nim Schools 

252 Jlsymttt $u Qartfora, eonm 




RICHARD BURMEISTER. 



W. V. ABELL. 

Comprises some of the very best New York artists and teachers, such as Richard Burmeis- 
ter, pianist; Theodore Van Yorx, tenor; and Frederick Blair, violoncellist ; also . . . 




Eleven other instructors. With this 
faculty the very best musical advan- 
tages to be obtained between New 
York and Boston are placed at prices 
within the reach of all. 

For circulars or detailed 
information apply to 

Oi. U. JVDell, musical Director, or 
U), D. monnien Secretary. 




THEODORE VAN YORX. 



FREDERICK BLAIR. 



THE INTELLIGENT PUBLIC 

Should know how the Deaf and Dumb make themselves understood. They converse with one 
another as freely as do hearing people. 

THE LORD'S PRAYER IN THE SIGN LANGUAGE, 



Is a beautiful 32-page publication, containing 18 full page photo engravings in tints, showing 
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MAILED POSTPAID 
TO ANY ADDRESS 




For 1 5 Cts. 



Each girl is in the act of making a motion which signifies a word in the prayer. The booklet 
contains an introduction by Prof. Abel S. Clark of the American School for the Deaf, Hartford, Conn. 
The publication is endorsed by E. M. Gallaudet, Ph. D., I^Iv. D., President of Gallaudet College, Wash- 
ington, D. C, by Job Williams, L,. H. D., Principal of the American School for the Deaf, Hartford, Conn., 
and Prof. John E. Crane, B. A., President of the New England Gallaudet Association. 



WILL INTEREST BOTH YOUNG AND OLD. 



Address. THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE CO., Hartford. Conn. 



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..TAPESTRY PAINTINGS.. 

2000 Tapestry Paintings to Choose From* 30 Artists 
Employed, including Gold Medalists of the Paris Salon. 

"When in New York don't fail to call and see these paintings. You will be welcomed. Make this 
place a point of interest. We rent Tapestry Paintings. Send 25c. for Compendium of J 40 Studies. 

* Jlrtistic Borne Decorations * 



"VVT can show you effects NEVER before thought "VY/Utt have your house decorated and painted by 
W e of, and at moderate prices too. VV ny inferior workmen, when you can have it 

done by skilled workmen— by artists — for the same 

price. 

Write for Color Schemes, Designs, Estimaites. ARTISTS SENT TO 
ALL PAKTS OF THE WORLD, to execute every sort of Deco- 
rating and painting. We are educating the Country in Color 
Harmony. 

Wall Paper, Stained Glass, 
Relief, Carpets, Furniture, 
Parquetry Tiles, Window Shades, 
Art Hangings, Draperies, Etc. 

\TT tt "D «^A«*oi N®w styles designed by gold medal artists. From 10 
W all reapers. cents per roll up. bend 50 cents to prepay express- 
age on large sample books and drapery. A quantity of last year's paper 
$1 and $2 per roll ; now 10 and 25 cents. Will include drapery samples in 
package. See our Antique Metalic, French, Pressed Silks, and Lida effects 
in special colors to match all kinds of woodwork, carpets and draperies. Have 
500 different wall hangings with draperies specially made at our Broomhead 
Mills, Patterson, N. JT, to match. 

TN -A^ « We have Draperies to match all wall papers from 15 cents 

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acme of artistic excellence in decoration. No matter how much or how 
little you want to spend you must have harmony of form and colorings. 
Write us for samples. Special Silk Draperies made at our Broomhead Mills, 
Paterson, N. J. Encourage Home Industry ? Write us for samples. 
nr ^4.-.,, 1171^4. /^*J^t« We manufacture Tapestry Materials. Supe- 

1 apeStry iVlatenaiS* nor to foreign goods and half the price. 
Book of samples, 10 cents. Send $1.50 for trial order, for 2 yards of 50-inch 
wide No. 6 goods, worth $3.00. 

T^ I.: ^ A J^^i^^ Upon receipt of fl. Mr. Douthitt will answer 

L/eCOrailVe -rLQVICe. any question on interior decorations— color- 
harmony and harmony of form, harmony of wall coverings, carpets, curtains, tiles, furniture, 
gas fixtures, etc. 

•Kir t £ A J. T\^ ^^i.i^^r. The art book of the century. 200 royal quarto 

Manual OI Art UeCOratlOnS. pages mied with fuU-page colored illustra- 
tions of modern home interiors and studies. Price, $2. If you vant to be up in decoration 
send $2 for this book, worth $50. 

Q^t, _ -.1 Six 3-hour tapestry painting lessons, in studio, $5. 

OCnOOl* tions by mail $1. Tapestry paintings rented; fi « , - •■ 

brushes, etc., supplied. Nowhere, Paris not accepted, are such advantages offered pupils. 
Send $J for complete instructions in tapestry painting and compendium of 140 studies. 
r* l^t' TD i^4.^J X5..,*.t^4^c Over 100 new styles for wall coverings, at 25 cents 
VjObltn r^rinted OUriapS* per yard, 35 inches wide, thus costing the same 
as wall paper at $1 per roll. 240 kinds of Japanese Lida leather papers, at $2 per roll. 
/^ l^t' A i. T\ ^ ^^^^ Grecian. Russian, Venetian, Brnzilian, Roman. Uococoo, 
ijOblin Art JJrapery. Dresden, Festoon College Stripe, Marie Antoinette, 
Indian, Calcutta, Bombay, Delft, Soudan, from 10 cents a yard to 75 cents. 

In order that we may introduce this line of NEW ART GOODS, we will send one y.ird 
each of 50 different kinds of our most choice Patterns for $(.o0. 

John F* Douthitt^ d^17^vc d^^^^ 

^Jt^^ 286 Fifth Avenue New York. No.«r 30th St. 




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FREE TO OUR READERS. 

"Picturesque Connecticut." 




O doubt many of our readers would 
like a copy of " Picturesque Connec- 
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JAMES GATES PERCIVAL. 
(From a Painting by a Brother of the Poet. Hitherto unpublished.) 



The Connecticut Magazine 



Vol. 6. February, 1900. 

THE CITY OF ROCKVILLE. 



No. 2. 



BY B. LEWELLYN BURR. 




NTO the history of 
nearly every vil- 
lage or city is 
woven and inter- 
woven much of 
the history of the 
township in which 
such incorporated district is located ; or 
perhaps we might properly make a trans- 
position and say that the history of the 
city is interwoven into the township. 
Whichever be the most proper expression, 
the warp and woof are both, to some de- 
gree, necessary in the write-up of an arti- 
cle which shall give type illustrations of 
this veritable Loom City from its days of 
swaddling clothes up through the various 
periods of girlish skirts, knee pants, short 
jackets, and finally to the time of its 
majority and dignified manhood. But I 
shall, as briefly as possible, touch on the 
paternal relations of this incorporation ; 
neither shall I attempt any extended 
complimentary biographies of those now 
living, therefore the merited ones, whom 
I might but do not mention, will take no 
jealous offence, while in my mention of 

61 



those who have " gone before " I can with 
safety select those who most forcibly 
impress themselves upon my memory. 

Rockville, this one of the smallest cities 
in the state, is the legitimate offspring of 
the good old town of \'ernon, the business 
center of which was once about four miles 
to the west. I say offspring, for it is not 
so much of a real outgrowth of a minor 
township as many other cities, but it is a 
child of one section reared away from the 
paternal home. Properly speaking its 
ancestors were from Vernon, and they 
were the sturdy sons of toil, with the 
necessary grit to combat with the rough 
wildness which Rockville was in those 
early days. 

The town of Vernon was first settled 
by families from East Windsor and Holton 
in the year 1 716. It was originally called 
North Bolton, and was set off from Bolton 
in the year 1S08. The principal streams 
are the Hockanum and its tributary, the 
Tankaroosen. The first mill to which 
any definite date can be fixed as to erec- 
tion was at the i^lace known as \' alley 
Falls in the year 1 740. and this was a saw 



62 



THE CITY OF ROCKVILLE. 



mill by one Thomas Johns, and was after- 
wards turned into an oil mill for produc- 
ing oil from flax seed. In about 1847 
wool carding and spinning was carried on 
there. In 1809 Peter Dobson, whose 
name is even now a household word all 
over the town, came from Suffield, and 
with two others, Chapman and King, 
erected buildings and set to work at mak- 
ing cotton goods. Mr. Dobson was an 



Grant, having acquired title to about 500 
acres of land, which is in reality the site 
of our present city, mounted his horse 
and leaving his home in Windsor, followed 
the narrow forest paths until he came to 
what is now West street. Here he set to 
work and in a few weeks' time had a log 
house erected. That one was afterwards 
replaced by a more substantial frame 
house, and this in turn by the one now 




English manufacturer, and with the neces- 
sary tools and machinery in mind, with 
the aid of a blacksmith and a joiner, pro- 
ceeded in 181 1 to spin yarn. The weav- 
ing was done on hand looms in the fami- 
lies. The production was shirtings, sheet- 
ings, tuckings and ginghams. The mills 
known as the Phcenix were established in 
1790. Col. Francis McLean, who after- 
wards helped to make history, was inter- 
ested in property near by. 

But we will now take a closer glance at 
Rockville. In April, 1726, one Samuel 



owned and occupied by Nathaniel Grant,, 
which stands on the site of the former 
structures. It will be seen by this that 
the village might properly have been 
named Grant village, but owing to its 
rocky nature it was called Rock village 



THE CITY OF ROCKVILLE. 



Oi 



and from this it naturally took the name 
of Rockville. The history of the Grant 
family is a legitimate part of Rockville 
history, but it would require many pages 
to do even the least justice here. 

It is thought that sawmills and grist- 
mills were in operation near what is now 
the Adams mills, as early as the years 
1750 to 1760, by a family named Payne. 
And gin stills were in operation at a date 



of industrious families. There was little 
time for afternoon whist — bicycles were 
in the future, and physical culture consist- 
ed in the broom drill or in operating the 
old dasher churn. The weaving in those 
days was done on hand looms, after which 
the cloth was sent to the dressers to be 
colored and finished. 

About this time, however, there was 
something of a revolution " in the air." 




TAT.COTT PARK. 



not mentioned. One Simeon or Simon 
Cooley had a fulling mill here. Up to 
about the year 181 1 the spinning and 
weaving of wool was done in a very crude 
way. The bundles of wool were sent to 
the carding machine, made into rolls, 
which the farmers' wives and daughters 
spun on hand wheels. These were the 
pianos of those early days, and their 
buzzing, breezy music accorded with the 
sound of cooking victuals in the kitchens 



One Delano Abbott conceived the idea of 
making satinet. Mr. Abbott was a farmer 
living about three-fourths of a mile from 
Vernon Center, and he is supposed to be 
entitled to the honor of introducing not 
only into this town, but into the United 
States, the manufacture of satinet. The 
commencement of this work is quite in- 
teresting. Mr. Abbott procured a small 
scrap of cloth whic h by unraveling gave 
him the knowledge of the weaving pro- 



64 



777^ CITY OF ROCKVILLE. 





ROCKVII^LE CHURCHES. 



cess. Being then anxious to 
produce it he employed Peter 
Dobson, before mentioned, to 
build some crude machinery, 
and as a result the first piece 
of satinet was made in 1811. 
About everything was hand 
work. His house was his 
"mill." About this time also 
one Dr. Hinckley engaged in 
the manufacture of the same. 
About the year 1814 satinet 
making was embarked in 
more largely. Ebenezer Nash, 
grandfather of our present 
town clerk, F. B. Skinner, 
and a nephew of Delano 
Abbott mentioned above, 
erected a small mill near the 
present site of the Hockanum 
He started two sets of cards, 
spinning machinery and a few 
hand looms. He also put some ma- 
chinery in the ell part of his house. The 
mill was burned, when a company was 
formed, and this constituted all of the 
woolen manufacturing in Rockville up to 
1821. The population of the whole town 
at this time was less than one thousand. 

The real life blood of Rockville is She- 
nipsit (Indian name) Lake. It is now 
called Snipsic. It was this never-failing 



THE CITY OF ROCKVILLE. 



65 



stream with its heavy fall which tempted 
these enterprising old Vernon men to 
come to this then almost impenetrable 
forest to found a little new world. Where 




pect street, with its upwards of a hun- 
dred families, was once an Indian path 
over which possibly tribes from the 
'' Head of Snip " and of Windsor 
were wont to pass. 
The Payne mill 
before mentioned 
stood near the site 
of the present 
Adams stone mill, 
but just where is 
not known. The 
old dam was simply 
a log laid across the 
stream with slabs 



now stand the fine brick buildings of 
Belding Brothers and Regan (Fitch) 
mills there was a deep chasm down which 
people were wont to look with fear and 
trembling as they came from over Tol- 
land way., Strange stories of this wild- 
looking place were handed down to 
later inhabitants. What is now Pros- 





ROCKVII.I.E SCHOOLS. 



set against this and 
backed u]) with 
earth. This was 
about the year 
1S25, and what is 
now Snipsic lake 
was then simply 
Tavne's mill pond. 
In 1834 the Payne 
property was 
bought by the Rock 



66 



THE CITY OF ROCKVILLE. 




COIv. FRANCIS MCI.EAN. 

company, and a rough stone dam was 
built three and one-half feet high. 
There were also iron works near 
the Payne mill, dating back some say as 
early as 1741. About the year 1847 a 
new dam thirteen feet high was built by a 
water power association, and in 1866 it 
was raised to its present height, twenty- 
seven feet. From 
the top of this to 
the West street 
level there i s a 
fall of two hun- 
dred and seventy- 
five feet. 

It is to Col. 
Francis McLean 
that credit i s 
usually given for 
introducing the 
first real woolen 
factory into the 
village. In the 
spring of 1821 Mr. 
McLean, having 



purchased property from the Grant heirs 
and formed a partnership with George and 
Allen Kellogg and Ralph Talcott, with a 
nominal capital of ;^i 6,000, started in ear- 
nest to the work. A dam was thrown 
across the stream, and this is none other 
than the dam which now crosses at the 
east of the Orcutt residence. The canal 
was then dug and the wheel pit located. 

It may not be out of place to say here 
that there were no spirit levels in those 
days. The late " Father " Cogswell was 
heard to say that carpenters in setting 
window frames often went to a beam 
above and ejecting a little saliva watched 
its descent, and this determined the accu- 
racy of the frame. In other cases the 
" plump bob " was used. For a level 
Col. McLean, with characteristic Yankee 
ingenuity, improvised a level for his use 
by grooving one side of a piece of scant- 
ling so that it would hold water. Filling 
this it was quite easy to approximate a 
level line. Now commenced the work 
on the mill. Timber was cut from the 
near-by woods, and ere long a building 
30x80 feet and three stories high was 
erected. Wise ones of course shook their 
heads. The expectation of making 100 




THK GRANT HOUSK. 



THE CITY OF ROCKVILLE. 



67 



yards of cloth per day was considered 
preposterous ; but these men of iron 
nerve never flinched. Three sets of 
woolen machinery were put in, and the 
making of blue and mixed satinets was 
commenced. Jacks and power looms 
were unknown. In 1822 to 1823 they 
were crude and imperfect. These, how- 
ever, were greatly improved by a Mr. 
Beach and the late "Father" Cogswell, 
who built one hundred looms, and he 
simply a house carpenter. Matters im- 
proved in various ways 
until about the year 1832 
when the "Old Leeds" 
mill was built. Col. 
McLean left about a year 
previous t o this and 
George Kellogg (" Uncle 
George") became the 
agent and Ralph Talcott 
the superintendent. The 
new mill was built in 1846. 
Salaries in those days were 
not princely, the president 
receiving $400. 

Notwithstanding the fact 
that Col. McLean is con- 
sidered the pioneer in 
woolen manufacturing here, 
it is recorded that pre- 
vious to I 8 2 I Messrs. 
Grant and McKinney 
conducted a little mill, 
afterwards known as the Springville. 
The McLean enterprise developed into 
the present Rock manufactory and the 
Springville into the present larger 
Springville. The American mill was built 
about the year 1841. Although it 
has had its ups and downs, under 
the present management it is doing 
a good and profitable business. Joseph 
M. Wade, of Wade's Fiber and Fabric, 
was at one time agent of this mill. 
The New England mill was built in 1S37, 



and conducted by George Kellogg and 
Captain Allen Hammond. It was burned 
about four years later, but was immedi- 
ately rebuilt. Satinets were formerly made, 
but later the mill was run on fancy cassi- 
meres, an entirely new branch of woolen. 
Its introduction was a notable event in 
manufacturing in Rockville. The present 
New England, a successor of the old one, 
was organized in 1879. ^ ^^^ brick mill 
was built about a dozen years ago and 
both of the mills are in constant opera- 




LOOKING WEST FROM MARKKT STRKKT— 25 YEAR.' 



tion. Further down the stream comes 
the New Springville, a successor of the 
old one. It is a nice brick structure, ex- 
celling any other mill in town. Still 
further is the Hockanum, whose gooils 
are known the world over. The company 
dates back to 1S36, the original capital 
being $75,000. It is this mill oi which 
the late George Maxwell was president 
for so many years. 

The White, Corbin ^^' Co.'s envelope 
works, now run by the I'. S. Envelope 



6^ 



THE CITY OF ROCKVILLE. 



Co., are an evidence that 
many of our business 
concerns are like tall oaks 
from little acorns. The 
business dates back to 
1856, when the late Cyrus 
White and the late John 
N. Stickney started one or 
two machines in the little 
building now owned by Mr. 
Murlless, a portion of which 
is worked by Anderson 
& Watts, marble workers. 
Mr. White was a black- 
smith. From this little 
beginning has grown up a 
concern worth about 
^300,000. W. H. Prescott, 
now president of the U. 
S. Envelope Co., was man- 
ager for many year'^. 



Ii>r^^. 



'A*^^-V>:j .\i\Stl|^ 



^'l£^ 





SECOND CONGREGATIONAI^ CHURCH TAKEN 
BEFORE 1865. 



UNION STREET I.OOKING WEST — 2$ YEARS AGO. 



Starting in as bookkeeper. The machines 
were quite crude in the early days, yet 
they were considered a wonder. Mr. G. 
Puifer, now of Stafford, made many of the 
machines, and when he brought out the 
first one, which did the counting as well 
as folding, it was a seven day's wonder. 
The machines now in use gum, fold, print,, 
count and put into packages ready for 
the boxes. The concern has been con- 
sidered the largest envelope plant in the 
world. 

The J. J. Regan mill is the outgrowth 
of the flock business which was carried 
on by him for some years in the old 
Florence mill, which stood adjoining the 
east end of the envelope mill. On the 
death of Cyrus White his gingham mill 
property was purchased and the business 
was extended to the making of blankets, 
etc. 

Belding Brothers, silk manufacturers, 
are known almost the wide world over. 
The enterprise was started by E. H. Rose, 
shortly before the days of the Civil war. 
About the year 1863, Belding Brothers 



THE CITY OF ROCKVILLE. 



69 




i*''*|«gfi«p;i.^«»**»w« 



Tm4 




THE CITY FROM lOX HI 1.1. 



70 



THE CITY OF ROCKVILLE. 



formed a partnership with Mr. Rose. 
Business was carried on in a portion of 
what is now the Regan mill. The history 
of the business is an interesting one, but 
it would require much space. Suffice it 
to say that the company now has several 
mills elsewhere. ■ 

The Adams mill should properly take 
precedent, as it is the first to take water 
from the lake. This mill was run by 




MEMORIAL HALL. 

Joseph Selden, now of Norfolk, for about 
eighteen years, from 1853. It went into 
the hands of the Adams Mfg. Co., and for 
many years has been conducted by Mr. 
Adams. The product is warp. 

Martin's Fish Line works are not large, 
but are worthy of mention. The late 
Elisha Martin was the founder. The busi- 
ness is now carried on by the sons. 

It must not be expected that the men 
who laid the foundation for this little city 



slept on flowery beds of ease. They were 
men always up and doing. It was said 
of "Uncle George" Kellogg, one of the 
early ones, that he slept in the mill; that 
instead of taking " Delmonico " dinners 
when on business trips to Hartford or 
elsewhere, he often carried his dinner 
basket with him. This same economical 
disposition possessed the other early man- 
ufacturers. " Father " Cogswell, a man 
who carried the history of 
Rockville in his head, says 
in some of his writings that 
in 1823 there were only 
five families in Rockville, 
then called Rock district, 
and that from 1820 to 
1826 there were less than 
fifty persons living here. 
Twelve hours constituted a 
day's work for many years, 
but finally an hour was 
taken off, and again about 
fifteen years ago a day's 
work was brought down to 
ten hours. 

In those early days the 
founders were the self-con- 
stituted rulers, the guardians 
of the moral and religious 
welfare of the place. 
Employees were required 
to attend church and the 
^'improvised" laws as com- 
pared with the later times, 
savored somewhat of the 
old " Blue Laws." There was no Sunday 
boating on Snipsic, or listening to 
so-called sacred concerts. In fact a 
quiet stroll even about that place sub- 
jected the offender to a reprimand. 
All roads led to the meeting house and to 
that only. Boarding house keepers frowned 
down everything which savored of week- 
day pleasure or business. It is said 
jokingly that barrels were whipped for 
allowing the cider to work on Sunday ; 



THE CITY OF ROCKVILLE. 



7' 



hens dare not cackle and dogs were not 
permitted to go out of their kennels in 
search of bones. Sunday commenced at 
sunset on Saturday and woe be to the 
man who conducted himself other than 



pack their goods and do other kinds of 
work. 

Up to 1840 there was no public hall 
in the village. During this year one 
Sears erected the building (lately burned) 




ST. BERNARD'S CHURCH. 



** Sundayfied " after that time. On Sun- 
day evening, however, the secular work 
began and work or play was not consid- 
ered sacriligious. Even the good fathers 
of the town were wont to enter their 
factories after the Sunday sun had set. 




THK AI^MSHOUSE. (ORlGINAIvI.Y A TAVERN.) 



which stood just south of the present Ex- 
change block. Arrangements were made 
for a hall in the upper story. Public sen- 
timent was so strong against it that work 
was suspended for awhile to consider the 
pohcy of doing this. Work was finally 
resumed and the 
young people, long 
under restraint, 
were happy at the 
anticipation of an 
opening dance. 
The late WilHam 
R. Orcutt was one 
o f the p r i m 
movers in the 
entertainment. He 
was met on every 
side by the " vil- 
lage fathers " and 
importuned not to 
establish a pre- 



72 



THE CITY OF ROCKVILLE. 



cedent for destroying the souls of the 
young people. Even threats of discharge 
were held over the heads of employees. 
Some may have been deterred from at- 
tending, but the affair was a success and 
though the watchword was '^ On with the 
dance," no person was discharged. The 
dancers were happy and many a time 
after this the "light fantastic " was en- 



collectively for a year or two previous. 
Vernon Center was the ^' Hub." There 
is where business men, famihes, sweet- 
hearts and lovers got their letters. Town 
meetings were held there up to 1856, 
when they alternated between the Center 
and Rockville. Down the turnpike 
walked year after year the " Chaffee boys " 
to deposit the only abolition tickets in the 





gi.impse;s of snipsic. 



joyed. Reference to these radical senti- 
ments of the early settlers is not made 
with any feeling of censure. While con- 
trasting radically with modern times, I 
opine that just a little more of the spirit 
of those days would be a beneficial ming- 
ling with that of to-day. 

Up to 1842 Rockville had no post office 
although mail may have been brought here 



box, while youngsters and politicians 
jeered them on their way. Nine years 
later the whole voting privileges were 
transferred to Rockville. Samuel P. Rose 
was the first postmaster. The office was 
located in a store on the south part of 
what is now Central Park. George Tal- 
cott, now president of the First National 
Bank, was a clerk there. The building 



THE CITY OF ROCKVILLE. 



73 



was moved to the present site of the High 
school building. Rockville was then on 
a " through express " route from New 
York to Boston. The route was over the 
south side of Fox hill until diverted this 
way to accommodate the new post office. 
The office was moved about somewhat 
until 1859 when a small building was 
erected for the purpose on the site of the 
building now occupied by E. H. Preston 
as a fdrniture store, and here it remained 



relay house where changes of the old 
stage horses were made. It was over this 
route that General La Fayette passed 
when he visited this country in 1824. 
Some errors have been published in con- 
nection with this house. Many people 
are of the impression that a room was 
fitted up for his reception and that he 
stopped there. Neither is the case. The 
peculiarly fitted room is a noticeable one, 
but the General had no part in its history. 




I^OOKING TOWARD SNIPSIC FROM FOX HII.L. 



for about twenty years, when the office 
was moved to its present location. About 
this time the Henry building was erected, 
and the little building which had played 
such an important part in Rockville his- 
tory has since done duty as a horse barn 
at the rear of the " Rockville." 

While speaking of the old turnpike 
route, mention should be made of the 
present almshouse at the eastern part of 
the city on account of its historical con- 
nections. This was originally a tavern, a 



He came through here and was driven to 
Hartford by a mere boy, who remembered 
the circumstance with much pride. 

Rockville not being on a •' through rail- 
way route," does not need the hotel facil- 
ities which it otherwise would, yet in that 
respect it has ever been known for its hos- 
pitality. There are two such houses, the 
Rockville and the American. Mention 
should be made of the first hotel or 
tavern, the house just opposite the alms- 
house, and a tritle later what is now the 



74 



THE CITY OF ROCKVILLE, 



almshouse was a tavern. The next ven- 
ture may properly be considered the 
Rockville house, although not exactly the 
present structure. The house now occu- 
pied by Lawyer B. H. Bill as a residence 
and office formerly stood on the present 
hotel site and was built and used as a 
hotel. In about the year 1851 the build- 
ing was moved and the present structure 
in its original form was erected. In 1892 
it was so changed that it hardly bears 
a semblance of its former self. It has 
had several landlords, the late Francis 
Keeney being remembered as one of the 
best and most genial of any to be found. 
Murdock McPherson is the present pro- 
prietor, and the reputation of the house 
is kept to a high standard. 

The main pubHc structure is the Memo- 
rial building, erected in the year 1889 
as a memorial to the men who represent- 
ed the town in the Civil war. It is one 
of the finest of the kind in the state ; is 
thoroughly fire-proof, and cost with its 
finishings upwards of ^100,000. It con- 
tains town offices, a large town hall, supe- 
rior court room and a Grand Army hall 
which is a thing of beauty. The city also 
has its offices there. 

Rockville has several churches, the 
Union Congregational church being the 
most imposing in the city. It was erected 
about eleven years ago by the union 
society which was formed from the two 
societies. There is one Catholic, one 
Baptist, one Episcopal, one Methodist 
and one People's church ; also Unitarian 
organization. 

Rockville is on the Rockville branch 
which is underlease to the "Consolidated" 
railroad. Another branch also connects 
at Melrose with the line to Springfield. 
Since the starting of the H. M. & R. tram- 



way, two years ago the heaviest portion of 
the Rockville travel is turned that way. 
The road is seventeen miles long and is 
the best paying one in the state. 

For water, the Rockville Aqueduct Co. 
gives an unfailing supply of a purity equal 
to any in the New England states. This 
is taken from Snipsic Lake and there is a 
fall of from 250 to 275 feet in some places. 
A high pressure system in addition was in- 
stituted a few years ago to accommodate 
the residents on the hillsides. This water 
is pumped to a standpipe from which 
it gravitates. 

A public library is maintained in leased 
rooms, but other accommodations will 
doubtless be provided in the near future. 
The foundation for this library was a be- 
quest of $10,000 from the late George 
Maxwell, this to be held in trust together 
with a like amount appropriated by the 
town. A library and reading room was 
also provided for by him in the lower story 
of the Union Church to which his heirs 
are liberal contiibutors. 

The city has many fine business build- 
ings and while the costly residences may 
not be as numerous as in some cities, 
the homes will compare well with those of 
almost any place. For picturesqueness 
Rockville is not in any sense at the rear, 
Its variegated scenery, especially in 
summer season, is admired by visitors from 
far and near. Central Park is pretty, 
though not large, and Talcott Park, which 
is the result of the thoughtfulness of one of 
the early settlers, was not long ago pre- 
sented to the city by the Park Association 
which has maintained it for many years- 
Bernard Terrace, which adorns the city's 
center, is a perfect beauty with its triple 
parallel streets, and few cities can boast of 
its equal. 



HARTFORD TO NEW LONDON, FORTY-FIVE MILES. 



BY W. H. C. PYNCHON. 



' It was wicked bad campaigning (cheap and nasty from the first), 

There was heat and dust and coolie work and sun. 
There were vipers, flies, and sandstorms, there was cholera and thirst, 

But Pharaoh done the best he ever done." 

— RUDYARD KlPI.ING. 



New York, July 17th, 189- 
Dear Robert : 

V 

I suppose that I ought not to write to 
you for a few days, but I do not feel like 
waiting that length of time. So you are 
going West, — and that means that all is 




over. It is natural that you should have 
your ambitions, but why, oh why ! could 
you not have left me alone ? Two years 
ago I had not seen you. A year ago I 
would not have cared so very much if I 



had never seen you again. But you must 
needs make me care for you just for this ; — 
you have had your year's amusement and 
I suppose you are satisfied. There is no 
need that you should see me again ; in 
fact, I have taken steps to prevent any 
chance of your doing so. I shall leave 
the city to-night on the New London 
boat with an old friend of my mother's 
and shall eventually go abroad with her. 
Where she lives and where we are going 
you cannot find out. My head aches and 
I cannot write any more. So I will wish 
you a safe journey and will say ''(Good- 
bye," — perhaps the kindest thing I can 
say. Frances. 

He sat still for several minutes trying 
to take in the meaning of it all. How 
could she have so misunderstood him 1 
For two years he had worked hard, but 
had been able to lay by nothing ; and 
only a week ago a friend in the West had 
made him a special oft'er— the offer of a 
lifetime. Why did she not see that his 
sole object in accepting it was to make a 
home for her? After all that had passed 
between them she could think him guilty 
of this heartless thing : And the first feel- 
ing of which he became conscious was 



75 
6 



'je HARTFORD TO NEW LONDON, FORTY-FIVE MILES. 



anger at the unjust accusat 
in the fading hght, nursing 
the clock striking seven 
When did she say she was 
New York ? And then he 
ized that for two hours the 
had been plowing its way 
and that the happiness of 
slipping from his grasp. 



ion. So he sat 
his wrath, till 
roused him. 
going to leave 
suddenly real- 
great steamer 
up the sound 
a lifetime was 




NUKSKD HIS WRATH. 

What could he do ? No letter could 
reach her ; if it could, would it make things 
any plainer? What could he say more 
than he had said? He thought and 
thought, yet reached no definite plan ; 
till, dimly, through the chaos of the mind 
came the one overwhelming desire to see 
her and to make her understand, — and he 
knew that to do this he must reach New 
London before the dawn. 

A hasty consultation of a time-table 
showed that he had fifteen minutes in 
which to catch the last train over the New 
England Road, which, at Willimantic, 
made connections for the south. He had 
just time to catch a street car for the 
depot, but unhappily it was stopped a 
short distance from his destination by an 
ice wagon which had broken down on the 
track. Accordingly he had to make the 
rest of the distance on foot. It took only 
a few minutes longer than it would have, 
had the car been on time, but that few 
minutes tipped the scale and he rushed 
breathlessly up the stairs just in time to 



see the red tail-lights of the train vanish- 
ing around the curve to the north. There 
was, however, one more chance. He 
turned to the gray haired official, who 
has for so many years acted as guide-book 
and time-table to bewildered souls astray 
in the Hartford station, and asked him 
when the next train left for New Haven. 
"At 10.05," was the prompt reply. 
" Is there a connection for New Lon- 
don?" 

"There is a connection all right enough," 
came the answer, " but you won't get 
through to-night. There's a freight wreck 
somewhere east of Saybrook and there's 
no knowing when the track will be clear. 
Not before to-morrow morning, sure." 

H'e turned away stunned. So after all 
he could do nothing, — could not save his 
happiness. He walked along as in a 
dream and was only brought to himself by 
being run into by a bicycle on the first 
crossing. The rider swore at him roundly 
and vanished into the gloom. It was a 
trifling incident, but it turned his thoughts 
in a new direction and he remembered 
with a great throb of the heart that there 
was still one more chance. 

To one who has urged a wheel over the 
road which runs from Hartford to New 
London through Colchester the name 
" New London Turnpike " brings a host 
of memories. They are memories of end- 
less climbing, — hill above hill, hill beyond 
hill — hills " rock-ribbed, and ancient as 
the sun ; " of stretches of white sand that 
glitter and shimmer in the heat ; of 
scantily used roads, of few wayfarers, of 
lonely houses, of uninhabited wastes. Such 
it is in the day. What it is at night those 
can guess who know the desolateness of 
the hours before the dawn. But it was his 
only chance and he took it gladly. 

The nine o'clock blow of the big fiie- 
bell had just boomed out over the city as 
he turned from Main street into Morgan 




WHAT IT IS AT NIGHT THOSE CAN GUKSS WHO KNOW- 
HOURS BEFORE THE DAWN 

77 



THE DKSOI.ATKMISS OK THK 



7^ HARTFORD TO NEW LONDON, FORTY-FIVE MILES. 



and began to descend the long grades 
toward the river. It had been a day of 
stifling heat and the squalid lower streets, 
with all their inhabitants on the door- 
steps and sidewalks, lay gasping in the 
breathless night under the moon. The 
rail of the bridge was crowded with dark 
figures trying to get a little coolness from 
the light air that was creeping up the 
river from the southward. Even inani- 
mate things seemed to feel the intense 
heat and the trolley-cars waiting on the 
switches of the causeway seemed to have 
dropped there from sheer exhaustion. 
But when he turned south at East Hart- 
ford and began to ride against the breeze, 
things became more endurable. Like 
Sir Bedivere, 

" His own thought drove him like a goad," 
and it required the greatest self-control 
to maintain the steady and moderate pace 
that he knew he must maintain in order to 
last till morning. 

It was a quarter to ten when he reached 
Welles Corner in Glastonbury and turned 
toward the dim ranges of the eastern 
horizon. A couple of miles found him 
on foot, toiling up the grades that rise 
steadily, steeply for two miles more. 
High on the hills he stopped a moment 
to wipe his streaming forehead and to 
look back at the road he had come. Be- 
low him the valley slept in the moonlight 
— stretching out broadly westward to the 
dim Talcott Range, while in the middle 
distance twinkled the lights of Hartford, 
— and through the midst of all the great 
river slipped on quietly to the sea. It 
was a fair picture, but time was flying, 
and he turned resolutely to the dim road 
and the forest-clad hills. 

Mile after mile he toiled on, sometimes 
walking, sometimes riding. There was no 
sound of life but the occasional hooting of 
an owl, yet even that seemed stifled in the 
heavy, lifeless air of the wood roads. 



Dust lay thick on everything, and, look- 
ing back, he could see the little clouds of 
it that he had raised in passing hanging 
motionless where the moonlight streamed 
through the trees. So the miles crept 
slowly and the hours crept swiftly on. 

The moon was high in the heavens 
when, at the foot of a sharp little hill, he 
came to a narrow stone arch spanning a 
deep ravine. The light did not break 
through the overhanging trees, but below 
him he heard a little stream flowing and 
water seemed to him the one thing in the 
world worth having. With difficulty he 
climbed down through the shadows, 
drank deeply, and then bathed his face 
and neck in the cold little brook. Greatly 
refreshed he climbed back into the moon- 
hght nor knew that a few feet away death 
had waited in the thick, loathsome coil 
of a rattlesnake, one of many that have 
long given Dark Hollow Brook a grue- 
some fame. 

At last, after many miles, he began to 
find the road easier and below him he 
saw the heavy bank of fog that broods all 
night over Marlborough Pond. Slowly 
he descended into the mantle and all be- 
came dull and ghostly and he was moving 
in a dream. The road before him, the 
sleeping village were no longer real. He 
passed beyond the fog, but the feeling did 
not change and he labored on steadily, 
evenly, with the joyless, monotonous effort 
of those who in sleep press on toward a 
shadowy goal that is never reached. Still 
he moved on through a world unreal, till 
the wheel swerved in the first of the long 
sand reaches that lie northwest of Col- 
chester. Still he kept on, walking where 
he could not ride, dimly conscious of 
weary muscles and aching brain and of 
the long white road glistening in the 
moonlight. 

It was one o'clock when he found him- 
self at the head of the old green in Col- 



HARTFORD TO NEW LONDON, FORTY-FIVE MILES. 



79 



Chester. Here nature re-asserted itself 
and hunting up the hotel he roused the 
sleepy landlord and got something to eat. 
Then, having extracted a promise from 
his host to wake him at a quarter of two, 
he threw himself on a sofa in the hall and 
was at once asleep. 

It seemed to him that he had only just 
lain down when he was wakened by the 
moonlight falling upon his face. He 
sprang up to find it half past two o'clock, 
The landlord was sleeping peacefully in 



the cyclometer that he was maintaining a 
fairly good pace in spite of the long dis- 
tance he had come. 

There comes a time in every long run 
when the wheel ceases to be a machine 
and becomes instinct with life. It quivers 
and leaps over the road, it picks its way 
between the ruts, it plunges through the 
sand, it answers with a bound to every 
effort of its rider. It is only those who 
have known the strange exhilaration of 
thit hour who have entered the inner cir- 




THE LONG ROAD SEEMED TO DANCE BEBORE HIS EVES. 



his chair. Leaving the money for his en- 
tertainment upon the table he limped out 
to where his wheel stood and was again 
on the road. In spite of stiffened muscles 
he made good progress and at last began 
to work down the long eastern slope of 
the divide that separates the valley of the 
Connecticut from that of the Thames. 
A strong breeze began to come up from 
the eastward, moaning over the hills, and 
flying clouds from time to time hid the 
moon, but the coolness refreshed him 
greatly and he knew by the brisk click of 



cle of the Brotherhood of the Road. They 
who have felt it know what I mean ; — and 
they also know that it is the hour when 
the lamp flares up before it burns dim. 

The excitement came over him soon 
after leaving Colchester and he gave way 
to it recklessly. Mile after mile of light 
and shadow flew by, endless proce.-sions 
of rocks and trees passed, and the re- 
action did not set in until he had passed 
Chesterfield and was only some seven or 
eight miles from New London, and then 
hope gave way to despair. It was grow- 



8o HARTFORD TO NEW LONDON, FORTY-FIVE MILES, 



ing light in the east and he seemed so 
far from the end. He felt his strength 
going and the thirst which had tortured 
him was being succeeded by deadly 
nausea. The long road before him, grow- 
ing plainer as the hght strengthened, 
seemed to dance before his eyes and he 
remembered dimly of having read some- 
where of a '' land of mountains and of a 
great white road," and the words kept 
running through his mind, keeping time 
to the clicking of the cyclometer which 
seemei^ to be beating itself into his brain, 

— ''click click click , a great 

white road," ami, as the wheel 

ran slower, " click click click 

, a great white — road !" 

He had left Hartford hastily, without 
knowing when the boat arrived at New 
London or when the boat- train left for 
Boston. He had ridden in a blind hope 
of getting there in time somehow and 
now he was consumed by fears and mis- 
givings. He could not know that a slight 
accident to the machinery had delayed 
the boat two hours and that he could yet 
reach the goal in time, and the wild rock 
hills heard the low cry of despair wrung 
from aching flesh and quivering nerves. 



He never quite knew how he made the 
last part of the run. He remembered 
dimly the swaying of the wheel and the 
agony of every jolt. He remembered 
dimly the few houses that grew many, oh, 
so slowly ! He had a vague remembrance 
of the hissing of the brake and of the 
lessened strain as the wheel shot down a 
steep street with a tall monument at its 
foot, and of Hmping painfully across lines 
of track and finding that the train was 
still there. 

A young girl, whose eyes seemed red 
with weeping was walking along the plat- 
form with an elderly woman. She started 
back with a low cry as a wheelman walked 
painfully toward her and called her by 
name. She took one long look at the 
familiar figure white with the dust of the 
road, at the face drawn with pain, at the 
hungry eyes — and she understood. 

The sun came out of the cloud in which 
it had risen. It touched the masts of the 
shipping and the spans of the great steel 
bridge. It flashed upon the spires of the 
city and streaming westward glorified the 
reaches of the great white road among 
the lonely hills. And for two people it 
shone upon a new world. 




JAMES GATES PERCIVAL, POET AND SCIENTIST, 



BY REV. MAGEE PRATT. 




-^-»-,^-^ .<_'<:$/ iV--<3^t-o -^^ -*~« ^^-^Z " 



afei) 






^^■ 




^>-.J, 



"T^ 



WHEN some nine years since I went 
to live in the town of Berlin, the 
name James Gates Percival had no mean- 
ing to me ; an omnivorous reader, it is 
almost impossible to believe that I had 
missed his works altogether, yet if I had 
read anything of his no impression had 
been made upon my mind and it was only 
when the common conversation of the 
people kindled my curiosity that I be- 
came interested in the subject of this 
sketch. Living within a few rods of his 
house, and the clergymen of the parish, I 
was often interviewed by his admirers 
who made pilgrimage to his home, and I 



became ashamed of the ignorance that 
compelled me to refuse a share in their 
enthusiasm. Then the varying estimates 
of his quality furnished food for thought. 
Some who knew him and judged only by 
his poor attire and moody speech esteemed 
him mad. Others believed him too indo- 
lent to make proper use of his powers, 
while but a few gave honor to the pro{ihet 
that came from their own country. Hut 
all combined induced me to seek material 
tor judgment of my own, and so I read 
his letters and poems, gathered all the 
knowledge I could reap out of the mem- 
ories of his friends, and have come to the 



8i 



^2 JAMES GATES PERCIVAL, POET AND SCIENTIST. 



deliberate conclusion, that he was nearly, 
if not quite, the greatest man among the 
many great men that Connecticut has 
given to the service of the world. It is 
not yet fifty years since he died and the 
memory of his work is growing faint and 
his name dying from the hps of men. 
Others of far less power and whose service 
was smaller are remembered with grati- 
tude, but this man who seems to me to 
be a human miracle is hardly remembered 
and perhaps the reason is not far to seek. 
Possessing in himself elements of power 
sufficient for the equipment of a dozen 
men of more than average ability, he was 
not practical, was made up altogether 
without worldly wisdom. The conse- 
quences of his weakness in this direction 
pursued him in life so that he was always 
poor and in trouble, and like a Nemesis 
hunts his memory into oblivion now that 
he is dead. Had he in hfe concentrated 
all the marvelous force of his genius upon 
one object, had he been either poet or 
geologist or mineralogist or linguist alone, 
his work in either direction would have 
insured perpetual fame, but having varied 
capabilities the circumstances of penury 
drove him hither and thither from one 
work to another ; from poetry to diction- 
ary making, from botany to medicine, and 
so the wondrous powers of soul and heart 
were partially frittered away, and the con- 
centration of purpose that would have 
earned immortality made an impossibihty 
in his wretched chequered life. 

And yet he deserves to be remembered 
for the work that he has done. There is 
much that is weak in his poetry, but there 
is much that is unsurpassed. I may be 
alone in my opinion, but I believe Sidney 
Lanier's ''Sunrise on the Marshes," to be 
the best specimen of American poetry, 
and Percival's ''Apostrophe to the Sun," 
in Prometheus, to rank very nearly equal 
to that masterpiece. And both were 



written by men who hardly knew where 
the next meal would come from, and both 
were shorn of part of their strength by 
the hardships of life. Had their hearts 
been lighter, the cares of life less heavy, 
the sweeter and richer would have been the 
songs they sung to enlarge the hopes and 
visions in the lives of men. I am not 
writing a critical estimate of Percival's 
poems. I would far rather that people 
should read them for themselves. They 
are well worthy of the time they would 
demand to be understood, but I do fear- 
lessly assert that for beauty of imagery, 
for splendor of diction, for wealth of im- 
agination, for classic knowledge, for the 
clear spiritual insight that penetrates the 
heart of things, they are unsurpassed in 
the whole range of American poetry. 

If I am asked why they are not popular 
I can only answer, for the same reason 
that Milton and Browning are not popular. 
You cannot find the meaning with a skim- 
mer. The cream is in the soul of the 
songs, and not on the surface, and the 
themes are mostly out of the range of 
common thought. They lack the sweet 
human interest of Longfellow, the deep 
sympathy of Whittier. They lead us out 
of the world of every-day interests into 
the secret places of nature and of God, 
and the laggard steps and faint hearts of 
those who love only the safe firesides of 
life dare not follow them. 

I have estimated him as the greatest 
son of his state, and these are my reasons : 
that whatever he did was done excellently, 
so that none could do the work much 
better, and in the wide range of his power 
I find his greatness. As a linguist he has 
had few equals. He could read and write 
correctly French, Italian, Spanish and 
German. He mastered the Gaelic and 
the Slavonic languages in their several 
divergences, he conquered Sanscrit and 
wrote poems in thirteen different tongues. 



JAMES GATES PERCIVAL, POET AND SCIENTIST 83 



As a mere youth he studied law and was 
admitted to the bar, was a doctor of medi- 
cine and at his examination the Board 
who examined him were more afraid that 
he would discover their Umitations than 
that they would find lack of knowledge in 
him. He edited a newspaper, translated 
ani revised a geography, was a thorn in 
the side of Dr. Walker through the pro- 
fundity of his etymological knowledge 
when editing and revising the dictionary ; 



Many a brainless man passe?^ for a 
sage because he has learned the art of 
posing well. To be able to strike an 
attitude and look like an oracle is often a 
mine of wealth. Those who think that 
ability is the passport to success have 
gone through the world with half-shut 
eyes. Charlatans and quacks make more 
money frequently than scientists and 
philosophers, and in the arts that please 
the multitude Percival was whollv de- 




HOME OF PSRCIVAI. AT KKNSINGTON, NOW OWNED BY ISAAC PORTER. jK. 



he gave lectures upon Botany, knew as 
much of mineralogy as any contemporary 
American, and his service to the science 
of geology by his work in the states of 
Connecticut and Wisconsin would have 
been sufficient for the life work of any 
ordinary man. He seemed in the world 
of knowledge to have only the limitations 
of time and space. Nothing possible to 
man was impossible to him in the domain 
of the mind. 



ficient. No man 1 think ever had less of 
what are called popular qualities. Shv. 
silent and shabby, he seemed like a non- 
entity in the presence of the public. To 
appear anywhere in a public capacity was 
a martyrdom to him. Now. to share in 
the success and i>leasures of the world a 
man must have some regard for its frivol- 
ities : Percival had none. There was no 
light side to his nature. Men of worth 
loved and helped him. but tliey were few 



84 



JAMES GATES PERCIVAL, POET AND SCIENTIST. 



in his day, comparatively, and the literary 
fellowship that made the life of Concord 
so beautiful was, alas for Percival, too late 
to give the help he needed to lift him out 
of his isolation into the peace of kindred 
souls. And he had no vices small or great 
that I can find ; his life was as pure as 
his soul was strong ; in every respect he 
was singular, and as a consequence, while 
not an outcast from the world he was 
really an hermit, shut out from spiritual 
communion with his fellows by the singu- 
larity of his marvelous endowment and 
the unique position he filled in the world 
of thought. 

Genius has been defined as the art of 
taking pains, and no definition in my 
opinion could be more unhappy or further 
from the truth. What it is I know not. 
What it does I am certain. It gives to 
its possessor the power of doing with con- 
summate ease and excellence tasks that 
are impossible to the majority of us, and 
that can only be done in an inferior man- 
ner by men of talent with almost infinite 
trouble. J. B. Gough and Wendell Phil- 
lips had the genius of oratory, and no 
scholarship or devotion can confer the 
gift upon the studious who have it not. 
Percival had an all-round mastership of 
mental possibility. Look at his poems 
as they were published. They were sel- 
dom retouched, just transcripts of his 
soul vision flashed upon paper and printed 
without any of the finishing work neces- 
sary to secure artistic perfection. He 
was wrong in this I know. The great 
poets gave more time to the polish than 
to the skeleton of their work, and had 
Tennyson and Longfellow written in equal 
haste and published with the same neg- 
lect of detail that Percival did it is doubt- 
ful if the verdict of the world would have 
accorded them a higher place in the Pan- 
theon of Art than that given to the almost 
forgotten singer of Connecticut. 



Percival was always poor, generally in 
debt and difficulty, and perhaps it was 
his own fault. He had too high a con- 
ception of his mission to make his genius 
a tool for money spinning. In very plain 
words he says so. This is his creed in 
his own words : " Philosophy, Religion 
and Poetry sit enthroned as a spiritual 
trinity in the shrine of our highest natures. 
The perfect vision of all-embracing truth. 
The vital feeling of all blessing good, and 
The living conception of all-gracing 
beauty. They form united the Divinity of 
Pure Reason," And this divinity he served 
with all the devotion of the ascetic, and 
it kept him poor, as the world counts 
wealth, but it gave splendid compensation 
such as only the souls of the true and 
strong can receive. He heard the har- 
monies that are forever singing themselves 
in the universe of God, to which all smaller 
souls are deaf. He could gather harvests 
of beauty from the waste lands of earth ; 
could see the charms of woodland and of 
lea to which dull eyes are blind. And 
away from men. Nature and God spoke 
to him , in lonely nights and days passed 
in forest and in field, in weary journeys 
on foot from end to end of the state, 
every stream was audible, every pebble 
had a message, and perhaps the story they 
told to him was better worth the knowing 
than the senseless chatter of the multi- 
tude who mainly speak of the dollar and 
its power. 

I would not omit to recommend the 
study of his prose writings to those who 
admire excellence. It is sometimes as 
vivid as DeQuincy's and always worthy of 
the poet, and it illustrates his thorough- 
ness. A leader in a small newspaper is 
written with as much care as a state 
paper, the Phi Beta Kappa oration is most 
beautifully ornate, a series of pen-pictures 
painting the secrets of an Empire, and 
his geological reports exact statements 



THE EVENING OF LIFE. 



85 



of facts without a superfluous word. His 
style always seemed scientifically adapted 
to the thought or thing he wanted to ex- 
hibit, and that I think is the best proof of 
literary power. 

The portrait printed with this sketch is, 
I believe, of undoubted authenticity, and 
has peculiar interest in the fact that it 
was painted by his brother. I am glad 
that I have unearthed it from obscurity 
and that The Connecticut Magazine for 
the first time exhibits it to the world. I 
found it in the possession of Mr. William 
Buckley, the town clerk of Berlin, Conn., 
who purchased it with other relics of the 
Percival family at an auction sale of their 
goods. It is an oil painting and I hope 
to see it in the Atheneum, the property 
of the state. Besides the picture there 
are two or three miniatures that look like 
Percival, and Mr. Buckley has also a large 
silver medallion of the masonic order with 



the name of the father of the poet — a prize 
for a masonic lodge. 

The picture of the house is of that 
owned by the poet. It is not his birth- 
place, that was cut in half and partly 
removed. One half is now to be seen 
opposite the Berlin Town house. The 
residence here shown is now owned by Mr. 
Isaac Porter, who has a great regard for 
the memory of Percival and who tries to 
preserve as well as possible his former 
dwelling place as a shrine for those who 
revere his memory. 

As a parting word I can only ask my 
readers not to express a hasty judgment 
of my estimate of Percival's worth, but to 
read him for themselves and so I shall be 
satisfied. I think him worthy of greater 
honor than he is accorded, and it those 
who love to reverence worth will see for 
themselves, my work will be well done. 



THE EVENING OF LIFE. 



BY H. PHELPS ARMS. 

The brighter hue of youthful days 
In later years more softly glows. 
And lends to life as life delays. 
The golden tints of sweet repose. 

The calmer touch of time-worn hands, 
The mist of years in thoughtful eyes, 
The mellow voice that age commands 
Are kindred to sweet evening skies. 

Now, Memr'y casts her brightest ray, 
And Wisdom's light gleams far and wide. 
Whilst Faith encrowns the grand display. 
The glory of Life's even-tide. 

" O Age supreme ! O life benign ! " 
Thus hear unnumber'd voices sing 
All hail the work ! the great design, 
Of God the universal king. 




JAMIiS GATKS P^RCIVAI,. 



JAMES GATES PERCIVAL. 



REV. C. A. WIGHT. 



THERE is no more interesting and 
respectable country grave-yard in 
all Wisconsin than the one in Hazel 
Green. It is beautiful for situation. Hazel 
Green is a sleepy, quaint hamlet, num- 
bering less than five hundred inhabitants, 
situated on an elevation of prairie country 
in the extreme southwest corner of Wis- 
consin. As you ride along the highway 
that approaches the village from the 
north, looking to the east, you glance 
over a wide stretch of prairie to low- 
lying hills in the distance. To the west 
you may see the bluffs of the Mississippi, 
and a few miles to the south lies a mass 
of hills, in the midst of which is the city 
of Galena, famous as the home of Gen- 
eral Grant. When the lead-mining indus- 
try flourished in southwest Wisconsin 
Hazel Green was a stirring mining camp. 
But years ago lead mining in that region 
ceased to be profitable, capital was with- 
drawn, and the few people who remained 
in the village settled down to a quiet, 
uneventful life. Finally the town was left 
to one side by the railroad, which passes 
a few miles to the east. One may still 
see in the village evidences of its former 
prosperity. A few cultivated people are 
to be found among its inhabitants. Some 
old residences show by their size and gen- 
eral appearance that they once belonged 
to prosperous owners. A few neat mod- 
ern buildings have been erected in recent 
years. On the whole the place wears an 
aspect of age and decay. At present it 



is almost entirely overlooked by the out- 
side world. 

It is evident to the visitor in this out- 
of-the-way place that the inhabitants have 
an especial interest in the burial place of 
their dead. One is reminded of this by 
the following notice which the writer 
found posted at the entrance of the cem- 
etery : 

" NOTICE. 

Complaint Having been made Notice is 
hereby given to boys and others who 
make the cemetery a loafing place to 
destroy flowers and carry off other 
Tokens of respect to the dead placed on 
the graves by friends that they will be 
punished According to law if tbund loaf- 
ing there hereafter 

by order of Town Hoard 
hook the Gate Please " 

Whatever may be said of the above 
notice as regards its grammatical and 
other defects, it is plain that the town 
board succeeded in giving clear and for- 
cible expression to their meaning and in- 
tent in posting the notice. The writer 
was careful to "hook the Gate" upon 
leaving the cemetery. 

'•Our cemetery has a national reputa- 
tion," said a leading citizen of the place 
to the writer. Under the escort ot this 
same gentleman our party entered the 
cemetery and were conducted to a pretty 
spot where stands a modest granite shaft 
bearing the following inscription : 



88 



JAMES GATES PERCIVAL. 



''James Gates Percival 
Born in 
Berlin, Connecticut 
September 15, 1775 
Graduated at Yale College 
B A 1815 M D 1820 
State Geologist 
of 
Wisconsin 1854 1856 
Died in Hazel Green 
May 2 1856 
Eminent as a Poet 
Rarely accomplished as a Linguist 
Learned and acute in Science 
A man without guile." 

The inhabitants of Hazel Green are 
proud that Percival once lived in their 
midst ; proud that his remains are buried 
in their cemetery ; proud of the modest 



monument that Eastern friends and ad- 
mirers of the poet recently erected to his 
memory. 

A pathetic interest attaches to the life 
and memory of Percival. Near the end 
of his life, when he was much broken in 
health and his hair was white, he was in- 
duced to visit Hazel Green in the interest 
of the American Mining Company of 
New York. The company wanted to 
have a geological survey made of their 
mining lands and Percival had a reputa- 
tion as a geologist as well as a rhymer. 
He had been state geologist of Connecti- 
cut several years. His published writings 
on the geology of the state of Connecti- 
cut are a monument to the knowledge 
and industry of their author. 

In the financial depression of 1853 the 
American Mining Company failed, and 
Percival returned to his home in New 




MAIN STREET, HAZEI. GREEN, WIS. 



JAMES GATES PERCIVAL. 



89 



Haven, Ct. The citizens of Hazel Green, 
however, appreciating- his worth to their 
community as a geologist, induced the 



m 



^^: 







PERCIVAL'S MONUMENT. 



governor of Wisconsin to appoint him 
state geologist. We were shown a letter 
in Percival's handwriting, dated at New 
Haven, June 14, 1854, in which he 
states that Gov. Barstow had called 
on him June 6th of that year and 
offered him the position of state 
geologist of Wisconsin. The offer 
was accepted and Percival re- 
turned to Hazel Green. 

It is safe to say that no more 
eccentric character ever came to 
Wisconsin than James Gates Per- 
cival, poet, linguist and scientist. 

When a student at Yale he had 
read a poem before a literary 
society of the college that 



attracted some attention. President 
Dwight said to him on the occasion of 
his graduation, " Engage in some regular 
occupation, Percival, or 
you are a ruined man." 
But regular occupation 
was not to his taste. In 
New Haven he kept bach- 
elor's hall in some rooms 
in the State Hospital. His 
rooms were cheerless and 
littered with manuscripts 
and piles of books. The 
door was kept fast with a 
rope. As he passed along 
the street clad in a cloak 
of wool and silk, with a 
shabby fur cap on his head, 
and wearing shoes that 
were never blackened, 
^ people gazed at him in 

k^ wonderment. Yet many 

^^K people of note regarded 

^BP him as a man of rare 

mental attainments, a 
scientist of established 
reputation, and possessed 
of real poetic genius. A 
publisher wrote him, *' .\ 
poem from your pen will 
be regarded as a draft payable at sight." 
So he lived on in seclusion, devoting him- 
self to scholarly pursuits and writing con- 




90 

siderable poetry. 

Much of his poetry 

found its way into 

print, and gained 

for him quite a 

reputation in certain 

quarters. WilHam 

Cullen Bryant said 

regarding his poetry 

that "while he was 

one of the most 

learned of poets, he 

was also one of the 

most spontaneous in 

the manifestations 

o f genius. H e 

wrote with a sort of 

natural fluency 

which approached nearer to improvisation 

than the manner of most of our poets." 

The following lines are taken from . one 

of Percival's poems, entitled "The 

Dream of a Day " : 

"In silent gloom the world before me 
lay — 

In deepest night embosomed it reposed ; 

All genial hues of life had passed away — 

In sleep profound the eye of day had 
closed ; 

Beamed through the voiceless calm no 
fitful ray — 

Great Nature's heart to stillness all com- 
posed ; 

Oblivious dreams alone were moving 
there, 

Like soft wings fanning light the sum- 
mer air." 

The following description of the warrior 
is taken from his poem entitled " The 
Contrast" : 

" To his gallant horse the warrior 

sprung — 
They called but he would not stay ; 
And the hoof of his hurrying charger 

rung, 
As to battle he rushed away. 

* * * 

vShe stood aloft on the warder's tower. 
And she followed him over the plain, 



JAMES GATES PERCIVAL. 




HOTEIv WHERE PERCIVAI, BOARDED AND HAD HIS OFFICE. 



And she watched through many a silent 

hour, 
But she heard not his tramp again. 

* * * 
They came, when the morning was cold 

and pale. 
With a warrior on his bier. 
And his banner rent like a tattered sail,. 
Showed he died not the death of fear. 

They brought him in pride and sorrow 

back. 
To the home he had left so gay. 
When he gallantly flew on glory's track,. 
And to battle rushed away." 




PERCIVAIv'S ARM CHAIR. 



JAMES GATES PERCIVAL. 



91 



The above quotations are specimens of 
some of Percival's best poetical produc- 
tions. 

It is known that Percival was associated 
to some extent with Noah Webster in the 
making of Webster's Dictionary, for 
which task he was eminently fitted by his 
great attainments as a linguist. 

His appointment as state geologist of 
Wisconsin took Percival to far different 
surroundings from those to which he had 
been accustomed in New Haven. But 
among the miners of Wisconsin he was 




the; dr. jknckks rksidknck \v 



iiiiRiC i']';rci\ 



the same man in feeling and habits of life 
that the people of New Haven had 
known. 

Percival had talent, aye genius, but was 
unpractical. Many opportimities came 
to him. He had influential friends who 
were disposed to help him. But he failed 
to interest or please the world. He wrote 
considerable poetry. His poetical pro- 
ductions were not wanting in sentiment 
and imagination, but they did not interest 
the reading world. Lowell, who is per- 
haps too severe in his criticism of Perci- 
val's productions, says, " He never in his 



life wrote a rememberable verse." He 
made litde use of the opportunities that 
came to him. Because the world did not 
like his poetry he disliked and avoided 
the world. Possessed of the idea that his 
genius for poetical composition was of a 
superior order and that the world failed 
to appreciate his worth, he became embit- 
tered in spirit and sought to pay the world 
back for its neglect of him by shunning 
his fellows. Something of the bitterness 
that he felt may be seen in the following 
lines taken from " The Dream of a Day"' : 

" Brief is his power, obli- 
vion waits the churl 

Round to his own poor 
self ; his form decays, 

Hut sooner fades his 
name. Thou shalt un- 
furl 

Thy standard to the 
winds of future days — 

Well mayest thou in thy 
soul defiance hurl 

On such who would sub- 
due thee ; thou shalt 
raise 

Thy name, when they 
are dust, and nothing 
more : 

Hold on— in earnest hope 
look before." 

Percival looked con- 
fidently to posterity to 
appreciate his worth as a poet. 

In Hazel (Ireen the poet feii in with a 
Doctor Jenckes, a man of intelligence 
and high social standing, but almost as 
eccentric as Percival. The doctor's wife 
and a lady friend of hers, both women of 
considerable culture, sticceeded in mak- 
ing a friend of Percival, and with these 
two ladies he often conversed upon the 
lofty themes that occupied his thoughts. 
It is the testimony of those who knew 
him in Hazel Green that he never took 
the least notice of any other members of 
the female sex. While living in H?/el 



t 




92 



DAWN. 



Green he wore but one suit of clothes, a 
suit made of "pepper and salt" goods, 
which he had purchased in Nova Scotia, 
and for which he paid the sum of six dol- 
lars. A citizen of Platteville, Wis., said 
to the writer, " I saw Dr. Jenckes and 
Mr. Percival come into Platteville one 
day and noticed that Percival wore an oil- 
skin cap and a suit of clothes for which I 
would not have given twenty-five cents.' 
It seems that he was somewhat penurious. 
In spite of his odd ways and tramp-like 
appearance he commanded the respect 
and good-will of the residents of Hazel 
Green. They looked upon him as a man 
of great learning and talent, who lived 
amidst the fields, the woods, and with his 
own thoughts. They were rather proud 
to have such a man among them. One 
day he took a severe cold. Doctor 
Jenckes took him into his own house and 
cared for him. But he did not recover. 
He died May 2, 1856, and was buried in 
a lot belonging to Dr. Jenckes in the cem- 
etery in Hazel Green. 

Percival has been more harshly dealt 
with than he deserved. It was something 
to write poetry which in its day was 
praised by intelligent critics, and that 
showed some evidence of true poetic 



genius. It was something to be able to 
rhyme in a dozen or more different lan- 
guages. It was something to be a real 
scientist in Percival's time. It was some- 
thing that he impressed those who knew 
him intimately with his scholarly tastes 
and spiritual nature. 

He, himself, could fully answer to a pass- 
age in one of his own poems : 

"Thou hast the gift of song — a wealth is 
thine, 
Richer than all the treasures of the 
mine." 

It is good to think that pleasant mem- 
ories of him survive in Hazel Green ; that 
his remains lie buried in a beautiful spot ; 
that a respectable monument, erected by 
loving friends, now marks his earthly 
resting place ; that the house in which he 
died, the hotel where he boarded, and the 
arm chair in which he used to sit, are 
cherished by the citizens of Hazel Green, 
as precious rehcs of their famous former 
resident. 

The natural beauty of the spot where 
his remains are buried, and the traditions 
of the people of Hazel Green concerning 
him are a guarantee that his memory will 
be preserved to future generations. 



DAWN. 



A glance, — and across my life's gray sky 
A rose-gleam darted as lightnings fly. 

A smile, — through the mist of my life's despair 
There burst a glory beyond declare. 



A kiss, — in the world which my joy has made 
There is never a spot of sunless shade ! 

Florence Folsom. 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



BY CHAUNCEY C. HOTCHKISS. 



CHAPTER III. 



Hetty Wain. 



HETTY Wain stood at the door of the 
Glebe house looking up the road. 
It was a beautiful morning. The storm 
of the night before had gone, and now 
the sweet west wind was blowing a gentle 
gale, bearing with it a hint of the won- 
derfully forward spring of 1775. By 
leaps and bounds the warm rain had 
drawn the frost from the ground, and the 
air was full of the smell of the earth. 
The sky, soft and tender, was dappled 
with cotton-like clouds that drifted lazily 
across it, and the wide blue seas between 
the sailing islands were of wonderful 
depth. The naked trees in the yard 
whispered a tale of the coming season, 
and in the lulls of the wind the girl could 
faintly catch the roar of the swollen 
Pomperaug and the grinding of the hurry- 
ing ice. 

The maiden herself was a fair type of 
the morning. Full of the flush and vigor 
of youth ; gentle in breeding, beautiful in 
figure and lovely in face. Life seemed to 
spring from her, and the very doorway of 
the homely old house lost something of 
its square and uncompromising character 
as it framed the picture. Her clear blue 
eyes were as deep as the velvety sky 
above her, and her whole being — from 
the end of her coarse shoe to the top of 
her pretty head — betokened the richness 



that goes with young womanhood alone. 
It was the bursting of the bud — the rush 
of early summer — the glory of the rising 
sun. 

And yet, withal, there was a touch of 
something softly serious in the droop to 
the corners of her sweet mouth as she 
shaded her eyes with her small hand — a 
hand slightly calloused in the palm — and 
looked east. Under her eye and near the 
turn of the road she saw a crowd of peo- 
ple gathered about the front of Beacon's 
store, and for a moment her brows con- 
tracted. " It must be salt day," she mur- 
mured ; '' I hope it's nothing worse ; — and 
it is very late !" 

And for the inmates of the (ilebc 
house it was very late. The night before 
had been one of alarm, for the house had 
been beset by someone, doubtless in 
quest of the rector. Each door had been 
hammered upon and each window tried 
and tried again for the space of an hour. 
Plainly enough the girl could see the 
prints of boot tracks in the soft loam of 
the yard, but of the number who had 
come with the hope of dragging the rec- 
tor from his bed, she had no idea. 
Daintily lifting her skirt of homespun she 
stepped out. She might have been a 
scout in a hostile country, so carefully 
did she go the rounds of the premises. It 



93 



94 



THE GLEBE HOUSE, 



was for more than eggs she was looking, 
as she climbed the mow after probing the 
stall with its single fat pad and opening 
the cow-pen. It was for more than to 
figure the remainder of the diminished 
wood pile that she peered into the recess 
of the shed. Even the pig-pen partook 
of her scrutiny, and then with a little nod 





DAINTII^Y T^IFTING HER SKIRT OF HOMKSPUN SHE STEPPED OUT 



as though oE self-approval, she returned 
to the house. Soon after the back door 
swung open, and the solid wooden shut- 
ters of the lower windows were thrown 
back, letting into the long, quaint kitchen 
the slant of the brilliant morning sun. 

As she hastened to prepare the break- 
fast — a simple enough meal in the Glebe 
house — there was no song on her lips, but 



instead, a constant watchful shifting of 
her gaze through the window that looked 
east and toward the hollow store ! Until 
the night before the house had not been 
visited by any one more formidable than 
Cyrus Bent for three days ; but for the 
young girl the strain of anxiety had 
hardly been less on that account. She 
knew that danger 
threatened her patron 
and godfather, and 
woman-like her fears 
became magnified a t 
every unusual event. 
The group that hung 
about the door of the 
store might mean that 
it was the day upon 
which the townsfolk 
were at liberty to buy 
salt at the price fixed 
by the committee o f 
inspection, or it might 
be that something un- 
toward was threatening 
the rector. 

For herself there was 
n o fear. The hatred 
shot at the Glebe house 
had not been aimed at 
Hetty Wain. For her 
faith she was pitied ; 
for her beauty admired 
and envied. Through 
the rector's toryism she 
suffered a species of 
social ostracism, but it 
was not strongly 
marked and troubled her not the least. 
Against herself nothing was said. The 
superior attainments gained in her Hart- 
ford education, which ran from house- 
keeping to the high accomplishment 
of being able to play the harpsichord 
and sing to it to boot, prevented 
contempt, while her politics — presum- 
ably antagonistic to the prevailing 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



95 



spirit — was a matter of no moment, 
she being a woman. ^ No one, not even 
the rector, had ever heard Hetty Wain 
open her Hps and express an opinion as 
to the rights or wrongs of the existing 
stupendous agitation. No one asked for 
her ideas on the subject; she was pre- 
judged ; was she not an Episcopalian and 
an inmate of the Glebe house ? and was 
that not enough? The girl had no inti- 
mates, nor did she seem to regret it. A 
few old ladies comprised her visiting list, 
but of the society of the young, with the 
exception of Bent, she had little or noth- 
ing to do. She was as one in a transitory 
state, hoping and waiting; yet waiting for 
what ? 

It might have been that hope, long de- 
ferred, or it might have been anxiety for 
her godfather that was dragging down the 
sober corners of her small mouth or 
throwing a shadow over her brow that 
morning. Be the cause what it might, it 
was not intended for other eyes, for as 
she laid the last pewter dish on the table 
the shuffle of a feeble step was heard on 
the back stairs and the door opened to 
admit a man whose loose shamble and 
nerveless movements betokened the crip- 
ple, and on the instint her face cleared. 
Hetty went up to her father and kissed 
his stubble grown cheek, at the same time 
shouting a " good morning " in his ear. 

*' Good morning, child ! Has Jake 
done the chores ?" he asked in a tremu- 
lous voice. 

" He wont be here until noon, to-day, 
daddy !" she screamed back. " He filled 
the wood box last night, and now there be 
only the pigs to feed. I let the cow out ! 
Is god -dad stirring, do you know?" 

For an answer the old man— though he 
was scarcely fifty — only shook his gray 
head, and sliding with difficulty into a 
chair ac the table proceeded to eat his 
meal with that slovenly carelessness which 



marks the weak in mind. \\ ith the ten- 
derness of a thoughtful and loving woman 
Hetty attended to her father's wants, 
which were few ; nor were they satisfied 
ere the sound of a man's heavy foot- 
step was heard on the barren back 
stairway, and it was just then that the 
girl cast one of her numerous glances 
through the window. To her surprise 
the black crowd about the store had 
become active. A large fragment ap- 
peared to have detached itself, and was 
coming down the road toward the Glebe 
house. Both instinct and reason told the 
girl that such a gathering of men could 
have but one object in view. With a 
quick exclamation she flew to the stairway 
door, crying : 

'^ They are coming again, god-dad I " 

The steps ceased. 

" How many this time, Hetty? " asked 
the rector, his sonorous voice sounding 
rich and clear. 

" Oh ! ever so many — and you with 
little sleep, I warrant, and less breakfast ! 
Stop a moment — here — 1 " 

She ran back to the table, seized a loaf 
therefrom, laid upon it a generous lump 
of butter and returned to the door. 
"Go now — " she continued "and pray 
the siege will be neither protracted nor 
bear fruit. Don't come near me — I 
mustn't see you, god-dad. my eyes are 
tight shut. — Hurry — hurry ! '' 

" Hetty, my girl : act no lie in that 
manner!" came the answer t'rom the 
minister as he advanced into the room 
and laid his hand upon the latch of the 
parlor door. " What ha\ o 1 to fear fronT 
this mob? Cannot one bear persecution 
for a righteous cause? 1 would be un- 
worthy of my ottice wore 1 not willing to 
suffer for my king ! 1 would willingly 
meet them were it not that you — " 

But Hetty was in no mood for delay. 
Lavinc: her hand on his aim she urs^ed 



96 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



him into the parlor and closed the door 
between them, then she hastened to the 
table, snatched up the third plate with its 
knife and fork and thrust them into the 
cupboard. It must not appear that the 
minister was within the house. 

In the meantime from the parlor sound- 
ed the steps of the rector as he crossed 
the floor. There was the noise of a latch, 
of a tumbling wood pile and then a crash 
as though a heavy timber had fallen. 

The sound of the latter was that of a 
signal. With a hghtness and swiftness of 
motion known only in the young animal, 
the girl took from its nail a coarse broom 
and hastened into the parlor. It was a 
cold and cheerless apartment. The fire 
was laid ready for the brand, but it had 
not been kindled for many a day. On 
either end of the high chimney shelf was 
a massive silver candle-stick bearing an 
unused candle, the space betwixt them 
being filled with autumn boughs, their 
leaves now withered crisp and brown. A 
single mahogany table, three heavy chairs 
and a fine harpsichord against the wall 
comprised the furniture. The only relief 
to the desolate stiffness of the room lay 
in the newly laundered surphce that hung 
like a ghost from a peg in the wall. In 
the broad radiance streaming through the 
window the foot prints of a man could be 
seen on the sanded floor, their direction 
leading from the kitchen door to the 
closet by the chimney side. To this closet 
the girl went. Save for a pile of logs 
within, it was empty, but without a 
moments hesitation she shifted the wood, 
throwing it against the rear wall in a dis- 
orderly heap, then with a few passes of 
the broom she obliterated the marks on 
the floor and ran up stair to the rector's 
room. 

In her desperate hurry, methodical 
withal, it was but a few moments ere the 
bed was remade, the room put in order 



and every trace of its late occupancy re- 
moved. Then she placed her hand over 
her small bodice and looked from the 
window. The crowd had stopped midway 
in the road and was clustered about a 
common center as though engaged in 
consultation. Hetty breathed hard ; then 
with a heightened color born of haste and 
expectancy, but lacking another sign of 
her inward pertuibation, the young girl 
returned to the kitchen and with forced 
calmness seated herself at the table. 

So rapid had been her movements that 
she waited fully three ' minutes ere the 
shuffling of many feet and sound of voices 
was heard from without. The noise was 
but a preface to the loud knock at the 
door, which, without invitation, was im- 
mediately opened and there walked into 
the kitchen the committee of inspection 
headed by its redoubtable chairman. 
Squire Strong, the accompanying crowd 
of followers blocking the door way though 
they made no further move to invade the 
privacy of the house. 

With well feigned astonishment the girl 
arose from her seat courtesying to her 
guests, and without further civility or 
pretense toward hospitality, remained 
standing, her eyes wandering from the 
squire to each of the committee in turn, 
finally resting on the face of Cyrus Bent 
who brought up the rear and had sidled 
to the flank of the group farthest from 
the chairman. With something of wonder 
she marked the violent red welt that lay 
across the left cheek of the young man, 
though the rest of his countenance wore 
an unusual pallor ; his eyes she did not 
meet for he looked persistently at the 
floor. For a moment there was an awk- 
ward pause, then the chairman, clearing 
his voice as though to break the ice of 
the situation, spoke loudly. 

" We wish to see the rector ! " 

Hetty walked from her chair to wher 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



97 




98 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



her father still sat eating, he having ap- 
parently taken no more notice of the 
entry of the invaders than though their 
advent was an hourly occurrence. Laying 
her hand upon her parent's shoulder, she 
answered : 

'* I am afraid you cannot see him to- 
day, Squire Strong. You see he is not 
here ! " 

''He was here late last night, miss," 
was the sharp rejoinder, '' and he cannot 
be far off. Ye will bring him before us ! " 

Cyrus Bent looked up in time to catch 
the glance the girl gave him. To his sur- 
prise there was neither scorn nor anger in 
her face, but instead a smile, though 
whether of pity or amusement he could 
not determine for at once she redirected 
her attention to the speaker and an- 
swered : 

" Indeed, Squire Strong, I am not my 
godfather's keeper ; besides, sir, I would 
not produce him if I could ! Why do 
you persist in persecuting a man, a min- 
ister of God, who does but follow his con- 
science, as doubtless you do yours, sir? 
In what has he harmed any one?" 

" Do not question me, girl ! We are 
here in the name of the law to arrest a 
tory dangerous to the State !" answered 
the squire with a wave of his hand that 
indicated the entire committee, as he 
knitted his brows and showed his dis- 
pleasure by an irritable raising of his 
voice. " This young man vouches for his 
presence here last night ! Will ye tell us 
where he is?" 

'• I will not ! Do you expect me to be 
an informer?" was Hetty's retort, as she 
dashed another look at Cyrus and set her 
red lips tight. Then she continued,breaking 
out suddenly, — " You have but two things 
to do ; you or the committee, or whom 
ever you may hire far the work !" 

'' And what might these be, young 
woman?" asked the chairman. 



" Search the house as you did before, 
and then finding your searching useless, 
arrest me for a contumacious person and 
leave my helpless father alone to get 
along as he may. This is the most you 
can do, and I am ready. I am ready for 
anything but this continued persecution. 
If my godfather is but in danger through 
me he was never so safe !" Plere she 
drew herself to her full height, her anger 
making her magnificent, and patted the 
invalid on the shoulder as though she 
petted a child. The paralytic looked up 
wonderingly but immediately relapsed 
into seeming stupidity, while the squire, 
seeing no hope of bettering himself in a 
war of words with such a spirit, turned to 
his fellows who had stood hats in hand, 
and began a serious consultation. 

There was much nodding and shaking 
of heads, whispered suggestions and purs- 
ing of the lips ; but as the committee had 
laid out the plain plan of breaking up the 
royalistic nest which was sheltered by the 
roof of the Glebe house they were not 
long in coming to a conclusion as to how 
to act in the case of the maiden of the 
rectory. The chairman, still as spokes- 
man, stepped forward, his fine old face 
hardened by determination. 

"Young woman !" he said, "it has be- 
come our duty to act upon the suggestion 
ye have made. We believe ye to be 
standin' betwixt the domine an' justice, 
and therefore are ye dangerous also. 
Your father will be taken care of; fear 
naught for him — an' it is for ye to make 
yerself ready an' follow us after we once 
more go through this building. It may 
not appear well to ye, but we think the 
High Court at Hartford may make ye a 
little less downright to those who only do 
their sworn duty to the colonies." 

Hetty quailed inwardly at the unexpect- 
ed result of her bravado, though she held 
herself erect; and except for a lightning- 



ST. VALENTINE'S. 



99 



like change of color, was apparently un- 
moved. Not so Cyrus Bent. His knees 
visibly smote each other. With some- 
thing between a cry and a groan, he broke 
out : 

'' No ! no ! you will not do this. I will 
not have it so .' Has not your cursed 
committee enough to do without hound- 
ing women?" Then as one overwrought 
he staggered against the wall. 

What the immediate result of this out- 
break would have been it is hard to deter- 
mine, but at that instant there came a di- 
version. \ noise of voices and scuffling 
with a well rounded oath or two was heard 
from the yard, and a moment later a man 



ell)0we(i his way through the throng 
which blocked the door, scattering it 
right and left. Like one in authority he 
strode into the room, with the exclama- 
tion, " What is all this about?" but catch- 
ing sight of the young girl whose cheeks 
were now the color of ashes, he sprang 
toward her with the cry of " Hetty I" 
Like a frightened child she stepped from 
his outstretched hands, her eyes glowing 
strangely as she looked at him, her lips 
apart ; then with a hysterical laugh, which 
ended in a sob as her nervous tension 
gave away, she ejaculated : 

'' Sir ! sir ! oh ! Talbot, they are perse- 
ci/fijii^ us !" and sank into a chair. 

7'o be anitiniitd 




ST. VALENTINE'S. 



As children go, upon St Valentine's, 

In gay, mysterious groups along the street ; 

Brave in love-tokens and in soft designs. 

Knock at some favored dcor, and swift retreat, 



I 



So I come bringing Love's bright gift to-day 

To your heart's threshold, sweet, with all despatch : 

Differing in this, 1 do not run away, 

But, breathless, wait your hand upon the latch. 

ICli/aiuih .Ai.niN Ciktis. 




WARD CHENEY, FIRST I.IEUTENANT, FOURTH INFANTRY, U. S. A. 
(From a photograph by Motes & Moore, Atlanta, Ga.) 



LIEUTENANT WARD CHENEY. 



LIEUTENANT WARD CHENEY, of 
the Fourth Infantry, U. S. A., died 
at Imus, in the Philippines, January 7, 
T900 of wounds received in a skirmish 
with the Filipinos, and while he was 
leading a charge, eight men being with 
him. He lived but a few hours after he 
was struck by the fatal bullet. Ward 
Cheney was as well known in Connecti- 
cut as any young man, was the son of 
Colonel Frank W. Cheney of South 
Manchester and was born May 26, 1875. 
He was the grandson of the Rev. Dr. 
Horace Bushnell, the distinguished 
Hartford divine. He graduated at the 
Hartford Public High School, class of 
'92 and was graduated at Yale University 
in '96. He then went abroad for a year 
and traveled extensively, taking courses of 
study at Berlin and Heidelberg. Return- 
ing home he joined the editorial staff of 
the Hartford "Courant " with the inten- 
tion of devoting himself to the newspaper 
profession. The war with Spain breaking 
out in 1898, he enlisted as a private in 
Company G, First Regiment Connecticut 



Volunteers. He soon received a com- 
mission as second lieutenant and was 
ordered to Chicago at a recruiting station. 
While on duty there he was taken 
seriously ill with typhoid fever, returned 
home and on his recovery was assigned 
to duty in the Philippines. He had been 
promoted during his service in those 
islands to be First Lieutenant, and 
expected to be transferred to Cuba. 

Ward Cheney was the type of a high 
minded, whole hearted young New Eng- 
lander, serious, energetic and thoughtful. 
His education had singularly equipped 
him for a man of letters, and his genius 
was in that direction, but at his country's 
call he responded and abandoning the 
profession he had chosen, he elected to 
serve his country and to devote his life 
to its best interests. This he did, and 
although that life of service was short, 
who shall say that the influence of it upon 
the cultivated young men of his state, 
his university and his country was not 
far wider and better than he himself had 
ever dreamed. 

Thomas Snei.i. We.w fr. 





THE HOME. 



BY LOUISE W. BUNCE. 



ENTERTAINMENT, MARKETING AND ECONOMY. 




ITTING over the tea- 
cups the other after- 
n o o n with some 
friends and discuss- 
ing, a s ladies will 
(though this is not 
generally conceded 
b y the gentlemen) 
^' affairs," one of them made this remark : 
" My husband and I are going South next 
week for a change and to forget there are 
such things as cooks, and we have taken 

the same rooms at S again for the 

summer. Not that we can be as comfort- 
able anywhere as at home nor that my 
family are in need of any comforts that 
home does not supply but the constant 
demand upon me to contrive three meals 
a day and run my house smoothly makes 
me long to go to a place where I can 
enjoy breakfast, luncheon and dinner that 
I have not planned or provided." 

To such house-keepers I wish in this 
paper to appeal by suggesting some 
novelties to refresh the minds of those 
who are in like mood with my friend. 

I could take my inspiration from a 
young lady who at this moment burst 



into rather than entered the room with — 
'' Oh ! I've just come from the dearest 
luncheon and we had those birds served 
with the heads on whatever they are and 
some of the jolliest new things." 

We prevailed upon her to recite the 
entire feast as follows and I here give the 
readers of the CoNNEcncuT Magazine the 
benefit of the items and ways to prepare 
the dishes. 

Oysters on Half Shell, 

*Tomato Soup, (without stock), 

**Fish Timbales, 

White Wine, Celery, 

Sweetbread in Ramikins, 

***Snipe, 

Little Peas, Currant Jelly, 

****-Salad with Mignonette Sauce 

*****Orange vSalpicon, 

Fruits, Cakes, Nuts, 

Coffee. 

*ToMATO Soup. — Put into a sauce pan 
one can of tomato with one tablespoon of 
sugar, four cloves, two pepper corns and 
two white pepper seed and set it back on 
the range to simmer slowly for two hours. 
When it has cooked that length of time 
cut into small pieces half an onion and 
brown it in a tablespoon of butter being 



THE HOME. 



103 



very careful that it does not burn ; when an 
even brown add one tablespoon of flour. 

Blend this and add it to the tomato. 
Strain all through a puree sieve or coarse 
cloth and serve in cups with or without 
whipped cream on top. This is a very 
delicious light soup. 

**FiSH TiMBALES. — Boil a striped bass in 
water with a pinch of salt, twenty minutes ; 
remove skin and bones and put the flesh 
through a fine sieve twice expressing all 
the water. Put in a bowl and add the 
whites of three eggs beaten to a stiff froth 
and a-quarter of a pint of rich cream, 
white pepper, salt and a pinch of mace. 
Beat thoroughly together keeping as light 
as possible and pack in timbale cases which 
place in a roasting pan with water enough 
to surround them nearly to the top and 
stew twenty minutes. While they are 
cooking make a rich white sauce adding 
a-quarter of a pint of cream, and add to 
this a pound of boiled lobster cut in dice. 
Turn the timbales out on the serving 
platter and pour over them the white 
sauce. 

***Snipe. — Having the birds carefully 
drawn at the market and the eyes taken 
out cut off the feet and skin the lower legs 
which is easily done after dipping them a 
moment in scalding water. Skin the head 
in the same manner. Draw the head 
around on one side and pressing the bird 
firmly together skewer it through body 
and legs with the bill. Wrap each bird in 
a thin slice of salt pork and roast in a hot 
oven ten minutes basting with butter. 

Make a brown gravy adding the chopped 
livers and pour over before serving. 
Serve on toast softened with juice from 
the dripping pan. Garnish with parsley 
or watercress. 

**** Mignonette Sauce. — This is a 
delicious adjunct to either oysters or salad, 
in the first case omitting oil while using 
it in the second case. Chop fine one 



shallot, put in a cup with the juice of a 
lemon, half a teacup of white wine vinegar, 
a pinch of salt, four dried red pepper 
pods, (procurable at any druggists) and 
the last thing one or two tablespoons of 
salad oil. Mix well together and pour 
over the salad. A little red catsup may 
be added if a tomato or celery salad is 
used. 

Orange Salpicox. — Use a grape fruit 
or orange for the case. Cut the fruit in 
two taking out all of the inside. Free the 
fruit cells of all the clinging inner skin 
and use the fruit as follows : mix equal 
parts of orange pulp, slices of banana, 
and grapes halved and seeds removed ; 
season with maraschino or sherry and 
place on the top two or three candied 
cherries. This dessert should be very 
cold and with plenty of juice. 

When our palates had recovered from 
the tickling sensation occasioned by this 
recital we fell to talking about weights and 
their comparative measures and I 
recounted a set in use in my family for 
many years, an excellent table of propor- 
tions, which all agreed was invaluable to 
the correct compounding of any viand. 

Weights and thfir Compakaiivk 
Measures. — Four teaspoons of liquid = 
one tablespoon. Four teaspoons of liquid 
=one-half gill, one-quarter cup, or one 
wine glass. One tablespoon ot liquid = 
one half ounce. One pint of liquid=one 
pound dry. Two gills of liquid = one 
cup. or one-half pint. One quart sifted 
flour = one pound. Four cups of flour 
= one quart or pound. One rounded 
tablespoon of flour = one-half ounce. 
One cup of butter = one-half pound. 
One pint of butter = one i^ound. One 
tablespoon of butter = two ounces. 
'' Butter size of a walnut " = one ounce. 
A solid pint of chopped meat = one 
pound. Ten eggs = one pound. 



104 



THE HOME. 



One of the company sighed quoting 
Thomas Hood, sHghtly altered, that, 
'' Entertaining's a very awful thing ! 
'Tis something like that feat in the ring, 
Which requires good nerve to do it — 
When one of a 'Grand Equestrian Troup' 
Makes a jump at a gilded hoop. 
Not certain at all. 
Of what may befall, 
After his getting through it ! " 

The first lady responded : " Indeed I 
have proof of that as I give an after-the- 
theatre supper this week to some of my 
daughters' friends and I don't know at 
all what to have." 

We each agreed to make a suggestion 
in order, providing she would stand by 
our colaboration and amid much laughter 
and gayety compounded the following 
fairly commendable menu : — 

*I/ittle Clams, 

**Vol-au-vent of Mushrooms, 

Lobster Chops with Truffles, 

Cold Pigeon, 

Bgg and Cress Salad, 

***Sandwiches, 

Coffee, Small Fruits Glace. 

*LnTLE Clams. — Serve six in a hol- 
lowed tomato skin seasoned with lemon 
juice, salt, a little horse radish and a dash 
of tobasco, crackers served with it. 



** Vol- Au- Vent. — Procure this " cap-of 
wind" of a caterer, fill the shell with 
saute mushrooms, cover with the pastry lid 
and serve, cutting down through pastry 
and all. 

***Sandwiches. — Make these of white 
and brown bread three layers in each, 
alternating with the brown in the middle 
of some and the white in some others and 
cutting them about ' twice the size of a 
chocolate layer caramel. 

During the week the feast has occurred 
and I've since heard that it was a decided 
success. 

Still one more novelty was brought up 
to which we all listened with intent to ''try 
it when we reached home." It was anew 
way of serving potato with birds by mix- 
ing with seasoned mashed potato an equal 
quantity of grated dairy cheese, dropping 
it in spoonfuls on a pan and placing it in 
the oven till the cheese browned. 

Just here one lady observed that it was 
six o'clock and in a hurry all took their 
departure quite forgetful in the culinary 
interests of the afternoon that they had 
met simply for a cup of tea. 

To be continued. 





OUR COLLEGES. 



EDITED BY CRANSTON BRENTON. 



YALE. 

THE annual Junior Promenade at Yale 
was held on Tuesday evening, Jan. 
23d at the Second Regiment armory. 
The " Prom," as it is generally known, 
was accompanied by the usual social func- 
tions and was most successful. The guests 
of the college arrived Saturday and from 
then until Wednesday held full sway. 
Battell Chapel is always crowded on 
Sunday with the visitors and their friends. 
During the administration of Ex- President 
D wight it was his custom to occupy the 
pulpit himself on that day. This year the 
service was conducted by the Rev. Joseph 
Twichell of Hartford. 

Monday afternoon the class teas were 
held. In the evening the Glee and Banjo 
clubs gave a concert in the Hyperion 
theatre, after which occurred the class 
germans. Tea was served Tuesday after- 
noon at the houses of the different socie- 
ties in the Sheffield Scientific School and 
in the evening the Promenade took place. 
President and Mrs. Hadley returned from 
their western trip in time to attend these 
annual social events. 

The President's trip through the west 
was an extended one, and its results are 
yet to be heard from. He explained to 
the alumni the plans for the new bi- 
centennial buildings. In his address 
before the Cleveland Yale Alumni Asso- 
ciation President Hadley called atten- 
tion to the fact that Princeton had raised 



a million and a half of dollars at her 
sesqui-centennial. '' It will not do," he 
said "for Yale to be outdone by Princeton. 
We must raise two millions for out bi- 
centennial." President Hadley received 
no donations during his trip. He stated 
that Professor A. D. Phillips, dean of the 
Graduate department would shortly make 
a trip through the country for the purpose 
of raising the necessary funds. 

For the past two weeks the attention 
of the entire University has been centered 
upon the condition of Professor E. J. 
Phelps who is suffering from a severe 
attack of pneumonia. Mr. Phelps gives a 
course in constitutional law and is univer- 
sally popular with both the faculty and the 
undergraduates. During his illness a 
cablegram was received from (Jueen Vic- 
toria inquiring in regard to his condition, 
a circumstance that evidences the great 
esteem and friendship felt for the ex- 
minister by the English Government. 
Professor Phelps will not be able to con- 
tinue his work in the college during the 
remainder of this year, and Judge W . K- 
Townsend of New Haven has been 
secured to take his place. 

The debating season at Vale is now at 
its height. Not only are there the regu- 
lar department societies, but class organi- 
zations also have sprung \\\\ and there are 
more men taking active parts in debates 
than ever before in the history of Vale. 
The regular annual debate with Harvard 



105 



io6 



OVR COLLEGES. 



will be held in New Haven, March 30th. 
The question for the debate will be sub- 
mitted by Yale on February i6th. and 
Harvard will have the choice of sides. 

The Princeton debate will be held at 
Princeton on May nth. It has not been 
decided as to who will take President 
Hadley's place as head coach for the 
debating team. Dr. E. V. Reynolds, who 
conducts the course in economic debates 
for the senior class, and Dr. C. S. Mc Far- 
land, who has been prominent in debat- 
ing work at Yale, have been mentioned 
for the position. 

The candidates for the track team and 
the crew have been called out and are 
hard at work in the gymnasium. A 
system, similar to the one in vogue at 
Harvard, has been adopted for selecting 
the 'Varsity crew. Each class will have 
a crew and the most promising oarsmen 
in each boat will be taken for the 'Varsity 
squads. It is probable that Dr. E. F. 
Gallaudet will have charge of the work of 
the crew. 

Mr. James Robinson has been selected 
to train the various athletic teams this 
spriiig. Mr. Robinson's success with the 
football team last fall is still fresh in our 
memories. Not a single Yale player was 
injured in the big games with Harvard 
and Princeton. 

Mr. R. B. Twitchell has resigned the 
managership of the Baseball Association, 
and Mr. F. B. Adams has been selected 
for the place. Yale will have a profes- 
sional coach for her baseball team this 
season. The services of pitcher Nichols 
of the Boston League have been secured. 
Nichols was the champion pitcher last 
season and it is hoped that his presence 
will be especially valuable to the Yale 
pitchers. He will come to Yale about 
the first of March and remain until the 
team leaves for the Easter trip through 
the south. 

Euc;ene W. Ong. 



TRINITY. 

IT has always been a part of the Trinity 
plan that the intellectual man should 
not be developed at the expense of the 
physical man, and consequently the 
college has always given a large share of 
attention to athletics. The close of the 
mid-year examinations finds the students 
greatly interested in the athletic plans for 
the coming year. Prominent among 
these is the project to form a triangular 
league composed of Tufts, Massachusetts 
Institute of Technology and Trinity. 
The plan was discussed to some extent 
last spring, and the Massachusetts 
colleges expressed themselves as favor- 
ably inclined to such a union. Trinity 
postponed her decision, chiefly on 
account of her lack of adequate field 
accommodations. Since then, however, 
the alumni have taken steps towards rais- 
ing ^10,000 for the improvement and 
enlargement of ihe present field, and this 
removes the only obstacle of consequence ; 
so it is expected that action in regard to 
the proposed league will be taken at once. 

The freshmen have organized a basket- 
ball team, captained by H. D. Brigham 
of East Orange, N. J. Their baseball 
team will be captained by George D. 
Rankin, of Saybrook Point, Connecticut. 
A. C. Short, of St. Louis, Mo., has been 
elected manager of both teams. 

Professor Luther, of the astronomical 
department, will make a careful study of 
the eclipse of the sun which is due in 
May. He will take a trip to Virginia, 
accompanied by several members of his 
classes, for the purpose of observing the 
eclipse from a point where it is total. 
The trip will occupy about ten days, and 
the party expect to return with many 
valuable photographs. 

General William B. Franklin has pre- 
sented the library a complete set in 123 
volumes of the Official Records of the 



OUR COLLEGES. 



107 



I 



I 



Union and Confederate Armies during 
tlie War of the Rebellion, and many 
other important government publications, 
including a full set of the Reports of 
the Commissioners to the Paris Expo- 
sition of 1889, at which General Franklin 
was the United States commissioner- 
general. Included also in this gift are 
the reports of several of the French 
commissioners. 

Among other recent gifts are a set of 
Sir Ralph Windwood's ''Memorials of 
Aifairs of State in the Reigns of Queen 
Elizabeth and James I," three volumes, 
London, 1725, presented by the Hon. 
Charles J. Hoadly ; the beautiful pri- 
vately printed memoir of Major-General 
John Sedgwick, U. S. A., presented by 
Emily Sedgwick Welch of Norfolk, Conn., 
and a translation of '' Gudrun," the 
Middle High German Epic, presented by 
the translator, Mary Pickering Nichols of 
Boston. 

The death of George Sheldon McCook, 
'97, has caused great sorrow in Trinity 
circles. He was a son of Professor J. J. 
McCook, and nephew of Gen. McCook, 
U. S. A. Two brothers had graduated 
before him, while a third is now in 
college. His death occurred on January 
7th in Paris, whither he had gone with 
the intention of entering the Ecole des 
Beaux Arts. In 1898 he served in the 
war with Spain in Company F of the 
First Connecticut Volunteers. Two of 
his brothers also served in the war, and 
the three upheld the reputation which 
has given their family the title of " the 
fighting McCooks." The College has 
passed resolutions of regret and of sym- 
pathy with Professor McCook, whose son 
was one of the most popular of the 
younger Alumni. 

Members of the class of '96 have 

passed resolutions upon the death of their 

. classmate Frederick MacDonald God- 

8 



dard, first holder of the Russell fellow- 
ship, who died recently in Pittsburg, 
Pennsylvania, after a short illness. 
After two years of graduate study in 
Germany he had returned to America to 
take up work in applied science in 
which his natural abilities and energy had 
promised a most successful career. 

James Albert Wales. 



WESLEYAN. 

It was a fortunate accident that seventy 
years ago located Wesleyan University in 
Middletown, Connecticut. Half-way be- 
tween Boston and New York and with 
good railroad connections with Hartford, 
Springfield and New Haven, MiddletowTi 
is easily accessible from any direction ; 
large enough to afford all the modern 
advantages of city life, it is still free from 
the distracting influences which meet the 
student in a great city. The college 
occupies extensive grounds on the side 
of a hill that rises gently for about a mile 
from the west bank of the Connecticut 
River. It faces one of the most beau- 
tiful residence streets in New England, 
and commands a charming view of the 
underlying town, the river, and the dis- 
tant eastern hills. Situated thus in the 
heart of the eastern college world, in one 
of the most beautiful of southern New 
England towns, a more favorable location 
for the University would be hard to find. 

The college grounds, comprising a 
square of fourteen acres, are divided 
longitudinally by five of the principal 
buildings standing in a row. with a broad 
sloping campus in front, and the Gymna- 
sium and Athletic Field in the rear. The 
buildings in the ''college row" are North 
and South Colleges, Memorial Chapel, 
the Library and the Judd Hall of Science — 
all constructed of Connecticut brown- 



io8 



OUR COLLEGES. 




WKSI^EYAN NORTH COIvIyEGE). 



stone from the Portland quarries. The 
library contains 57,000 volumes. 

Other buildings than those mentioned 
are Observatory Hall with the transit 
house, the Physical and Electrical Labora- 
tories, and the engine house. A plant 
for the manufacture of liquid air is in the 
process of construction. 

Wesleyan is not a theological seminary. 
While some of her graduates subsequently 
enter the ministry, the percentage is 
scarcely larger than that of those who 
enter the other great professions. Nor is 
it sectarian. Although the college is 
under the patronage of the Methodist 
Church, several of its professors as well as 
some of its trustees are members of other 
churches. Its student body is made up 
of all denominations ; its doors are open 
to all alike. 



The aim of the college is to give stu- 
dents a sound liberal education such as 
will serve them in every walk of life, 
whether it be business or professional. 

The faculty of the University now num- 
bers thirty-six, and the scholastic work 
is divided into sixteen different depart- 
ments and offers a total of 146 courses. 

Wesleyan men point with pride to the 
nearly seventy years of splendid educa- 
tional achievements of their Alma Mater. 
They bid you read the list of names com- 
prising the faculty. Among others the 
names of Rice, Winchester, Atwater and 
Conn are names to conjure with among 
scholars the world over and priceless is 
the prestige they have brought to our 
University. 

F. E. Wing. 



CONNECTICUT PEOPLE WHO INTEREST US. 




PROFESSOR W. O. ATWATER. 
From a photograph by llenuigcr Bros., Aliddletown. 



PROFESSOR W. O. ATWATER of 
Wesleyan University, whose ex- 
periments and deductions as to the 
effect of alcohol on the human system is 



attracting a great deal ot attention. 
These experiments are conducted under 
the auspices of the I'nited States De- 
partment of Agriculture. 



109 



HISTORICAL NOTES. 



THE following poem by Mrs. Sigour- 
ney on the old St. Andrews' church 
in Bloomfield, Conn., then known as 
Scotland parish, is interesting for its 
associations, both of author and church. 
St. Andrews' is the oldest Episcopal church 
society in Hartford County, having been 
organized in 1740. 

Aside from its being one of the oldest 

in the state, this society had considerable 

N of historic interest, on account of the 



treatment its first rector. Rev. William 
Gibbs, received from the Congrega- 
tional ists, because he would not pay 
their church rate. The story of his arrest 
and being dragged to Hartford jail, at 
the heels of a horse to which he was tied, 
which rendered him insane for the rest of 
his life, is well known. 

The present building was erected in 
1830 and remodelled in 1877, our two 
illustrations showing it at both periods. 



%^, 




THE LONELY CHURCH 



It stood among the chestnuts, — its white tower 
And slender turrets pointing where man's heart 
Should oftener rise. — Up went the wooded heights 
Abruptly beautiful, above its head. 
With verdant screen, shutting the waters out 
That just beyond, through deep sequestered vale. 
Wrought out a rocky passage. — Clustering roofs 
And varying sounds of village industry 
Swelled from its margin-=while the busy loom 
Replete with radiant fabrics, told the skill 
Of the prompt artizan. — 



HISTORICAL NOTES. 



1 1 



But all around 
The solitary dell, where meekly rose 
This consecrated church, — there was no voice 
Save what still Nature in her worship breathes, 
And that unspoken lore with which the dead 
Do commune with the living. — There they lay. 
Each in his grassy tenement, — the sire 
Of many winters, and the noteless babe, 
Over whose empty cradle, night by night 
Sate the poor mother mourning, — in her tears 
Forgetting what little span of time 
Did hold her from her darling. 

And methought 
How sweet it were, so near the sacred house 
Where we had heard of Christ, and taken his vows, 
And sabbath after sabbath, gathered strength 
To do His will, thus to lie down and rest 
Close 'neath the shadow of its peaceful walls, — 
And when the hand doth moulder, to lift up 
Our simple tomb — stone witness to that faith 
Which cannot die. 

Heaven bless thee, lonely dome ! 
And duly may'st thou warn a pilgrim bond 
From toil, from cumbrance, and from strife to flee, 

And drinks the waters of eternal life. 
Still, in sweet fellowship with trees and skies, 
Friend both of earth and heaven.— devoutly stand. 
To guide the living and to guard the dead. 

L. H. S. 




112 



HISTORICAL NOTES. 



Mr. Thomas Richards of Jersey City 
writes us an interesring letter regarding 
the iron mining articles in our former 
numbers of this year, as follows : — 

" I am much interested in Mr. 
Pynchon's articles on "Iron Mining in 
Connecticut," and especially in his sketch 
of the Salisbury Iron Co.'s works on 
Mount Riga. It was my birth place in 
1824, I grew up in the shadow of that old 
furnace and the two forges and seldom a 
day or evening passed that I did not 
visit them. The Salisbury Iron Co. did 
not send their pig iron to Canaan or 
Winsted to be converted into wrought 
iron. They had six refining fires and used 
nearly all the output of their furnace in 
those fires for the manufacturing of iron 
for guns for the U. S. government at 
Springfield and Harper's Ferry. In 1836 
or 38 the company built a puddling fur- 
nace for making iron for Collins & Co.'s 
axe factory at Collinsville. 

The capacity of the Mount Riga fur- 
nace was about three tons every twenty- 



four hours. The six refining fires used 
one and one-half tons of pig iron per day 
or one-half the output of the furnace, 
drawing it under a hammer into bars 4 x 
^ inches for gun iron and the balance 
into bars for scythe iron which was sold 
to Harris of Chapinville, (known at that 
time as Hrmmertown), and to the scythe 
works at Winsted. Consequently the 
Salisbury Iron Co. sold but little 
pig iron, but converted it into wrought 
iron at their works. The iron for guns 
was transported to Springfield by teams, 
sixty miles from Mount Riga. The iron 
for Harper's Ferry, by teams to the 
Hudson and down the river by tow 
boats. Distance from Mount Riga to 
the Hudson, forty miles. My grand- 
father, Thomas Day, forged the anchor 
for the frigate " Constitution," he being 
one of the pioneer iron workers of 
western Connecticut at that time. Mr. 
Pynchon has given us a good history of 
the iron industry in Connecticut in its 
earlv life. 



POEMS READ AT THE BI-CENTENNIAL CELEBRATION 
.OF DURHAM, CONNECTICUT, JULY, 1899. 



1699. 



BI-CENTENNIAL ODE. 



1899. 



BY WEDWORTH WADSWORTH, 



A lure, a snare 

In the depths of the wood ; 
An ambush where the red fiends stood, 

And be would dare 
Was brave, I trow. 

When life or death was a moment's throw ! 
But the pioneer 

Knew naught of fear, 
For his axe rang out, and his rifle spoke, 



HISTORICAL NOTES. 

And the stern woods fell 
As the Indian's yell 

Gave place to the peaceful hamlet's smoke. 



No laggards they 

Who had hewn their way, — 
These honored sires of a dauntless race, 

For their hearts beat strong 
At the sight of wrong 

And they worshiped God with reverent face. 
Wise, brave and true 

Their sons upgrew. 
And their pulses throbbed with the minute gun 

When the trembling earth 
Gave a nation birth 

And christened it Freedom, at Lexington ! 



When bugle call 

From Sumter's wall 
Brought brothers to their awful fight. 

With eye serene 
And martial mien 

The Durham men went forth in might. 
When came a cry 

Of agony 
From Cuba's persecuted hosts, 

The flag of Spain 
Was rent amain 

And the tyrant fell 'midst empty boasts 



Two hundred years 

Through hopes and fears 
Has the good town thrived and bravely stood 

And the hum of the reel 
And the spinning wheel 

Are relics of old time womanhood. 
No more they stir 

Or busily whirr, 
For the No7u is here, — and the Pcjs/ apart, 

But the song has thrilled 
And will ne'er be stilled, 

For 'tis woven fast in the Nation's heart ! 




GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Querists a^e requested to write all names of persons and places so that they cannot 
be misunderstood, to write on only one side of the paper, to enclose a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope, and ten cents in stamps for each query. Those who are subscribers 
will be given preference in the insertion of their queries and they will be inserted in the 
order in which they are received. All matters relating to this department must be sent 
to Thk Connecticut Magazine, Hartford, marked Genealogical Department. Give 
full name and post office address. 

It is optional with querist to have name and address or initials published. 



ANSWERS. 

To No. 10 (d) Jan'y, 1900 — Dorothy 
Parker was the daughter of Joseph and 
Ruth (Williams) Parker of Saybrook, 
Conn. Dorothy Parker was born May 
23, 1 7 13 and married Thomas Stevens as 
his second wife May 10, 1740. Her 
father was son of Joseph and Hannah 
(Gilbert) Parker and grandson of the 
settlers William and Margery ( ) Par- 
ker, first of Hartford, later of Saybrook. 
Will A. D. P. kindly give me date of death 
of Dorothy (Parker) Stevens, date of birth 
of her son Parker Stevens, and inform 
whether her sons Abel and Levi married 
or not, and give names of wives if any and 
dates of marriages. 

Francis H. Parker. 

Hartford, Conn. 

notes. 

Mr. William Abbatt, 281 4th Ave., N. 
Y., has in preparation a new edition of 
Mrs. E. F. EUet's Women of the American 
Revohiiion. He would be glad to receive 



from any descendants of such, authentic 
particulars of their "foremothers"' ser- 
vices, (if not already in print) for inser- 
tion in the book. 



queries. 

12. Ftary — When did John Frary ist, an 
early settler of Dedham, Mass., come 
to this country and where and when did 
he and his wife Prudence die? One 
authority says he died in Dedham, but 
another gives it Deerfield. Want date 
of marriage (about 1660) of their son 
Sampson Frary^ and family name of his 
wife Mary. C. L. S. 

13. Prince- Coley — In 1780, William 
Prince of Weston, near Stratford, 
Conn., married Abigail Coley, daughter 
of David Coley of Stratford. Want 
maiden name of David's wife, mother of 
Abigail. 

Mrs. Elizabeth Prince Child, 

Litchfield, Conn. 



114 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



I I 



14. Hitchcock-Holbrook — What were the 
given names of the father and mother 
of Ann Hitchcock who married Colo- 
nel Daniel Holbrook, a Revolutionary 
soldier who lived and died in Derby, 
Conn. 

AURELIA CrARY ToWNE, 

993 Willson Avenue, Cleveland, Ohio. 

15. Cole — Want ancestry and birthplace 
of Jesse Cole, born in 1752. He was a 
soldier in the Revolutionary War for 
three years. 

James H. Cole, 
West Cornwall, Conn. 

16. Arnold — John Arnold, born in Eng- 
land about 1594 and died at Hartford, 
Conn. 1664 aged about 70 years. Had 
son Joseph born in England 1625, died 
in Haddam, Oct. 22, 1691, aged 66. 
Joseph had son Samuel born in East 
Haddam in 1668, died in Haddam, 
March 20, 1739, aged 71. . From 
another source I find that Joseph 
Arnold from Hartford settled in Had- 
dam in 1662. He had sons Joseph, 
Josiah, Johothan, John and Samuel. 

(^) Was the John Arnold first 
mentioned of the same family as 
Thomas and his half brother William 
Arnold who settled the colony of 
Rhode Island with Roger Williams ? 

\^b) Was John's son Joseph, born about 
1625, the ''Joseph from Hartford" who 
settled in Haddam 1662? 



\c) Did Samuel, son of Joseph of 
Haddam have a son Enoch? 

{(i) Did any of his brothers have a son 
Enoch? 

((?) Want names of all Enoch's 
brothers and any dates of births, mar- 
riages and deaths. 

(/) Particularly want names of sons of 
Enoch, and if one went to Penn. to 
live and in what town. Who he mar- 
ried and the names of his children, 
dates of births, marriages and deaths. 

(i,') Wanted, ancestry of Capt. John 
Arnold, who was born in New London, 
Conn., 1754, married first, a Miss 
Barrel, second Miss Sewell of Hallowell, 
Maine. Eight children by first wife 
and two by second. He lived in 
Lebanon, Conn., and about 1800 moved 
to Hallowell, Maine. In 1808 moved 
to Monmouth, Maine. Died in 1847, 
aged 93. 

A. C. Arnold, 

Stamford, Conn. 

1 7. Matson-Case — Who were the grand- 
parents of Newell Matson, who was 
born Nov. 12, 181 5, married Flora 
Melissa Case of Simsbury Sept. 15, 
1840 and died July 28, 1887, on the 
side of his father William Matson, son 
of Asa, and of his mother Cynthia Hol- 
comb, whose mother married once a 
TuUer and once a Holcomb. 

Hfruert C. Andkkws. 
267 Michigan Ave., Chicago 111. 








=^i 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



HON. Another of the state's 

JAMES PHELPS. most prominent men 

has passed away. The 
Hon. James Phelps, 
whose death took place at his home in 
Essex, Conn., on the 15th of last 
month, was a man of splendid attain- 
ments. As supreme court judge, senator 
and representative, he had unusual oppor- 
tunities to show the superior qualities of 
mind and heart that were his. His kind- 
liness of disposition, his unquestioned 
abilities as jurist and legislator are too 
well known to be passed upon here. He 
enjoyed the entire confidence of both 
political parties of the state, as is attested 
by his unanimous election as Judge of the 
Superior Court in 1871, and again when 
he was unanimously chosen on the expira- 
tion of his term to serve as Judge of the 
Superior Court of Errors. His career in 
Congress was one of great usefulness to his 
country and to his state. He was a mem- 
ber of the standing committees on pen- 
sions, foreign affairs, and the District of 
Columbia. He was also a member of the 
special committee to investigate the 
alleged frauds in the Louisiana election 
and in the collection of revenue in the 
St. Louis district. With such a record 
in Congress it is not surprising that he 

116 



was re-elected to the Forty-filth Congress 
and again to Forty-sixth and Forty- 
seventh. After this last term he dechned 
further renomination. 

Judge Phelps labored hard for the 
interest of his state. Among the large 
number of bills whose passage he pro- 
cured, the ones for building the break- 
water at New Haven and for deepening 
the Connecticut river below Hartford are 
the most important. At the close of his 
Congressional career Judge Phelps, ardent 
democrat though he was, was again called 
to the Supreme bench of the state through 
the graceful act of a republican governor, 
Henry B. Harrison of New Haven, and he 
served until he reached the age limit of 
70 years. 

Thus ends the record of one of the 
state's most valued men, a record of 
splendid service to his state and to his 
country. 



SENSATIONALISM. It is extraordinary 

to observe the influ- 
ence that sensation- 
alism is exerting in all the ranks of human 
activity. We see it even in the pulpit; 
art, letters and politics are all but hope- 
lessly involved in the craving for no- 
toriety. 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



1 1 



IN ART. 

We might turn to last year's fiiroi-e of 
the Paris Salon, the statue of Balzac by 
Rodin. While we must accord to the 
great artist, in view of his acknowledged 
reputation as a sculptor, that he was sin- 
cere in his purpose to produce a work of 
art and an ideal of the man he would por- 
tray, we yet feel, looking at results, that it 
is impossible not to discern a most pro- 
nounced leaning towards the sensational 
for the sake, (unconscious it may be), 
of creating a stir,— to be talked about, to 
cater to morbid curiosity, to perplex the 
inner circles of art and unsettle the pub- 
lic, — a vagary of the impulses perhaps, but 
still a tribute to the startling — the sensa- 
tional. 

We look for something pleasing and 
inteUigible in the images of those we would 
honor by our monuments — assuming that 
the intention is to create these feelings — 
that succeeding generations may see, 
admire and understand. 

What has Rodin produced to accom- 
plish these ends? He has designed in the 
form of a man something no woman 
would caress, no child nestle up to, no 
friend embrace. In this masterpiece of 
his skill he expresses neither wisdom nor 
veneration ; love shrinks from so forbid- 
ding a presence and wit and humor look 
askance at the turn of those carven lips. 
We seek in vain for some faint glimmer of 
the better, the warmer, or the loftier side 
of Balzac's nature. We see before us only 
a clever and possibly great execution in 
marble of the mere downright anatomy of 
the man — his thick, bull-like neck ; his 
obesity and ungainliness, which is none 
the less pronounced because covered, 
and covered by a none too graceful robe. 
In a word, the sculptor seems to have 
taken his model at his worst — a flash 
light and camera could have done as much. 
With all due respect to the sculptor, it 



cannot be denied, even while acknowledg- 
ing his great reputation and the sincerity 
claimed for him by his friends, that he has 
yielded to the weakness of sensationalism. 

IN LITERATURE. 

To take only one of many instances, 
Kipling's poem,**The Truce of the Bear," 
is, we venture to assert, an example of/ 
sensationalism in the field of letters. Here 
we have a poem that is ignoble in purpose- 
since it casts suspicion, startling in meta- 
phor and offensive in realism ; written 
for what? — to catch the rabble, the com- 
mon herd of literary gluttons, that, sur- 
surfeited with an untold quantity of the 
miscellaneous reading of the day, must 
needs be fed with sensational productions 
to fire their laggard mental state. Kipling 
is shrewd enough to perceive this and take 
advantage thereof as a matter of commer- 
cialism and of egoism as applied to him- 
self, — he would be talked about, he would 
have sensationalism with a vengeance, and 
the result? Gold ! and a cynic's mental 
debauch. 

It would appear that a writer who can 
make a day's work net him what to the 
majority of us would be considered a for- 
tune, must have a great mine of mental 
resources at his command, and the judg- 
ment displayed in utilizing these resources 
so that they can be put in marketable form 
must make us pause before we criticise 
his very want of this quality of sagarity 
and proceed to convict him of what is 
here held to be a most flagrant and wholly 
unnecessary bid for notoriety. Kipling 
has no need of advertising, he is known 
wherever the English language is spoken. 
It is exasperating therefore to ones con- 
ception of the fitness of things to see a 
man of such undoubted talent descend to 
the vulgarity of seeking notoriety through 
the medium of extravagant versification. 
as we see it in his iioom. - Tlie Truce of 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



the Bear," a poem built up, almost line 
for line,in outbreaks of fantastic statement, 
loose conjecture and eccentric imagery — 
a flimsy product that embodies in its con- 
struction, imprudences, singularities and 
the cynic's contempt of sentiment. 

If we have written of a cold-blooded, 
calculating and sensational poem it is 
because we have read it from the pen of 
a man, who, so far as we know, has not 
even the savage's excuse of passion and 
revenge to prompt this wallowing in the 
mire of slander and suspicion. The con- 
clusion is irresistible that sensationalism 
is at the root of the matter. 

IN CIVIC LIFE. 

We have but to recall the scenes, the 
wild tumult and frenzy, that resulted in 
the unreasonable nomination of W. J. 
Bryan, — an erstwhile unknown, untried 
and almost youthful man, — to the highest 
office within the gilt of the people. In 
that act sensationalism was the controlling 
force. Mr. Bryan with his native shrewd- 
ness, his rare gift of speech and his auda- 
city, had but to launch forth an unusual 
phrase to touch the key to the love of the 
sensational — the startling— that he knew 
was latent in the vast throng before him, 
and, presto ! he is nominated ! In no 
sphere of the world's activity does sensa- 
tionalism hold such undisputed sway as in 
the arena of politics. Thoughtful, delib- 
erate, reasonable and judicious settlement 
of a political situation like that of a nomi- 
nating convention is never contemplated. 
Brass bands and noisy shouts, appeals to 
the passions of the hour, idle hero-worship 
and all the paraphernalia of the sensation 
monger is brought to the front, to the 
confusion and dismay of the few who hold 
to reason and the ideal. The candidate 
is nominated on the wave of sensational- 
ism, and his election made sure, or dan- 
gerously near to that, by the votes of 



ignorant rounders who vote according to 
their estimate of the notoriety of the 
candidate, not through a perception of 
his character and fitness for the high 
office to which he has been chosen. 

So much for sensationalism. Where 
will it end ? Must we deal in lurid 
exclamations, twist language to the limit 
in the search for bizarre effects, flaunt 
scandal and foul insinuations in the face 
of men to be admitted into the aristoc- 
racy of letters? Must we torture our 
brains for wild fantasies and audacious 
inventions, execute them in marble, and 
call it art — are we to select those we 
would have to govern us from the list of 
the great throng of notoriety-seekers, sen- 
sationalists, who by the accident of oppor- 
tunity in war, commerce or law have had 
the glare of public attention drawn to 
them, and who seek, if not by direct per- 
sonal exertion, then by the efforts of 
friends, to take advantage of this momen- 
tary position in the public eye to push to 
the front over the heads of wiser and bet- 
ter men — are we to have scrambling, 
sensational demagoguery and call it state- 
manship? Are we to see art, literature 
and civics in the splendor of their possi- 
bilities go down before the weak assault 
of hollow, blatant and idle sensationahsm ? 



PROFESSOR ATWATER 

OF 

WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY. 



Professor 
Atwater, the 
d i s tinguished 
scientist of 
Wesleyan Uni- 
versity, whose picture appears in our issue 
this month, is coming in for a great deal 
of criticism for his experiments to prove 
that alcohol is a food. Much, perhaps 
the whole, of this criticism is unjust, but 
all recognize and respect the sorrowful 
motive that seeks to arrest anything tend- 
ing to justify the use of alcohol in any 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



119 



form. According to the press despatches 
it is said that four thousand women of 
Connecticut, backed by the local, state 
and national W. C. T. U., have begun a 
crusade against the further attempt of 
Professor Atwater to experiment and to 
prove his theory. Naturally every 
thoughtful man will sympathize in the .. 
fears of these sincere advocates of total 
abstinence, but at the same time it is 
doubtful if they will agree that the danger 
is as great as it appears on the surface. 
The thought that forces its self upon our 
attention at this junction is, why do not 
these four thousand women who are 
combating the experimenting with alcohol 
divert some of their thoughts and energy 
towards clearing up the conditions that 
bring about the craving for this stimulant ? 
Why do not these women form a great 
society of ethical culture and — if such a 
term can be coined — scientific common 
sense? Let there be better kept homes, 
better food, less extravagance, more 
comradeship in matters that concern 
domestic affairs. Let the children have 
more attention shown them ; let these 
women be more persistent, more deter- 
mined in training their boys to look up, 
to look straight out into the world with 
clearer vision, instead of bandaging them 
up with weak resolutions and fears. In a 
word, let these four thousand Connecticut 
women of the W. C. T. U. join hands 
with their sisters in other lands and take 
to the easier road of applied ethics to 
solve the terrible question of drunkenness, 
instead of butting their dear devoted 
heads against the stone wall of alcoholism 
with its monstrous strength and untold 
wealth of resources for resisting attack. 






THE HOME. 



Readers of The Con- 
necticut Magazine will 
be interested in learning 
that the department devoted to the ex- 



position of domestic science, inaugurated 
in the January issue of this magazine, 
will be continued throughout the year. 
Miss Louise W. Bunce, under whose 
editorship the department is conducted, 
is a lady well known in Hartford society 
as an accomplished hostess who not only 
knows how to dispense hospitality in a 
successful manner, but is also conversant 
with the practical details that go to make 
that success possible. Her ability to 
prepare an excellent repast herself gives 
force to what she has to say on the sub- 
juct of which she discourses. Miss Bunce 
will from time to time introduce other 
topics of interest and value to the home. 



NEWSPAPER EDITORS. 
ARE HUMAN 



The editor of 
the New Milford, 
Conn., Gazette, in 
commenting upon 
Clarence Deming's utterances in his 
recent speech criticising Connecticut's 
newspaper editors for their lack of duty 
to the pubhc in not pushing certain desir- 
able reforms, very frankly admits that 
much of what Mr. Deming said is true. 
He then goes on to say that the great ques- 
tion of the hour is, how are we to promote 
the much-needed better government of 
our state, cities, towns and boroughs. 
The Gazette points out the evils that now 
exist in the government of our numicipal- 
ities and suggests a remedy. It says : 
"■ There is but one remedy. The intelli- 
gent and reliable citizens, the business 
men, the college men, the scholars must 
be forced out of their dangerous apathy 
and be made to see that they must attend 
to their civic duties as strictly as to their 
individual pursuits. It nmst be pounded 
into them that their individual interests 
and the interests of the public at large are 
becoming so interwoven and mutually 
dependent that neglect of civic duties as 
much as in the past will le^d to serious 



20 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



consequences that cannot be avoided or 
escaped." The Gazette takes the press 
of the state to task for not prodding this 
question to the limit and pushing hard to 
the front for its solution. Therein the 
Gazette is a little unreasonable. It for- 
gets that a newspaper editor is humanlike 
the rest of us. It credits these editors 
with having occasionally parted with the 
company of their clever, wide-awake and 
conscientious readers, who knew their 
duty, not only to themselves, but also to 
the community in which they live, and 
then spent considerable time in writing 
for a lot of inanimate, cane-sucking dudes 
and selfish and lazy men of all conditions 
in life, and endeavoring with all the power 
of logic and sentiment at their command 
to awaken them to a sense of the anoma- 
lous position which they occupy not alone 
towards the government whose protection 
they require, but toward their own par- 
ticular, material interests as well. Now, 
editors, we repeat, are human. Is it fair 
to say that they should engage in such 
work as a daily task — a continual lecture 
to indifference and idleness, or can it 
be reasonably expected of them to grow 
wildly enthusiastic in such depressing 
occupation — talking to an audience com- 
posed of inanities, makeshifts and various 
misfits that go to form that much too 
numerous colony of idlers in civic life 
who stay at home election day or who 
vote in a perfunctory manner, not caring 
much whether their vote has any value or 
not? It is a thankless task to attempt; 
it occasions nausea, nervous prostration, 
and general deterioration of the entire 
system, with all the hopelessness that 
follows the recklessness of trying to do 
too much. The editor of the New 
Milford Gazette and Mr. Clarence Deming 
should be a trifle more charitable and 
remember that newspaper editors are 
human. 



OUR COLLEGES. Most of US who havc 

graduated from the 
university of " hard 
knocks" and other kindred institutions 
will doubtless be glad to join hands with 
the old stagers of Yale, Trinity and 
Wesleyan in welcoming the new feature 
we have introduced (beginning with our 
January issue) under the caption of "Our 
Colleges." 

The bright and ambitious theories, the 
lofty ideals and the roseate hopes of our 
college boys will always appeal gratefully 
to lives attuned as ours are to the 
monotonous sounds of hard realities. It 
is interesting to hear of the great work 
going on in our universities and it is 
doubly interesting to have this informa- 
tion come from the undergraduates 
themselves. 

It is designed that the contributions 
from the different colleges, Yale, Trinity 
and Wesleyan, should be from represent- 
ative college men. The department will 
be under the editorship of Mr. Cranston 
Brenton, an alumnus of one of these 
colleges, who was for some time the 
editor-in-chief of one of the prominent 
college magazines and who is well in- 
formed in matters relating to collegiate 
journalism. 



WARD CHENEY. The body of Ward 

Cheney now reposes 
in its last resting place 
near the home he loved so well. 

How distressing it is to record so un- 
timely a death ! A bright young life in 
whose every heart-beat the vigor of a 
splendid youth proclaimed its being. 
Dauntless, modest as a woman, unswerv- 
ing in the path of duty, earnest in every- 
thing he undertook — a frank, honest, 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



121 



Connecticut boy — such was Ward 
Cheney, the studious high-school lad, 
the popular collegian, the clever news- 
paper man and the brave young soldier. 
The promise of a noble career is cut 
short, the splendid possibilites that come 
to all finer natures are stayed at the call 
of death — Ward Cheney is no more ! 



A BLOW 



TO 



PROGRESS. 



A bill relating to second- 
class mail matter, known as 
the Loud bill has been 
introduced in the house of 
representatives at Washing- 
ton, the provisions of which are most 
sweeping in character and calculated to 
seriously cripple the circulation and 
growth of nearly all newspapers and 
periodicals. 

It prohibits the mailing of sample cop- 
ies at the pound rate, thus depriving all 
publications of one of the most valu- 
able means not only of extending 
their circulations, but of securing new 
subscribers to take the places of those 
who die or drop out for various causes, 
and will therefore cause the general deple- 
tion of newspaper circulation by subscrip- 
tion. It defines subscribers as those 
^'who voluntarily order and pay, or agree 
to pay, for the same," under which defini- 
tion a person whose subscription has 
lapsed and has not been renewed is not a 
subscriber, and copies of periodicals sent 
to other than advance-paying subscribers 
could be excluded. 

This is a direct blow at the local 
country newspaper. It excludes from the 
mails as second-class matter all ''books 
or reprints of books," by which is meant 
all paper-covered books issued periodi- 
cally, which have done so much to popu- 
larize t^eap and good literature among 
the masses of the people. By imposing 
a prohibitive rate of postage upon this 
class of literature it will deprive the read- 
ing public, particularly the residents of 
remote and sparsely-settled localities, of 



one of the most valuable educational priv- 
ileges they have ever enjoyed. There is 
no good and sufficient reason why this 
bill should become a law. 

The object of the bill which Mr. Loud 
is so earnestly pressing for adoption is to 
increase the revenue of the postal depart- 
ment by the imposition of extra and 
wholly unlooked for expense upon large 
publishing interests, and will, as we have 
before said, seriously cripple, if it will not 
entirely force many concerns out of busi- 
ness. Even should the postal deficit be 
materially reduced by this measure, a 
point which we do not concede, it will be 
at the expense of the great educational 
progress of the country that is being 
splendidly augmented through the efforts 
of the publications affected by this bill. 
The enormous dissemination of knowledge, 
the sending forth of such a tremendous 
force for ethical and material good to an 
otherwise indifferent, and in many in- 
stances wholly unread, reading public 
through the medium of the different 
systems that accomplish this work, is a 
matter of far greater importance to the 
welfare of the country than the saving (as 
Mr. Loud asserts will be the case) to the 
postal service of some money. But will 
this measure accomplish the purpose for 
which it is offered? Let us see. For 
every sample copy of this magazine which 
is sent out free we eventually receive a 
letter or card of inquiry for advertise- 
ments and subscriptions and other mat- 
ters, such as requests tor back numbers 
etc. These communications are prepaid 
at full letter rates. In the aggregate, the 
prepaid full letter rate matter that results 
from the distribution ot printed matter 
under present conditions is so great that 
its stoppage by the Loud bill will 
undoubtedly bring about direct and in- 
directly a larger deficit in the postal 
revenue than now exists. To put it 
plainly, if not elegantly, Mr. Loud is doing 
his best to jump out of the frying pan into 
the fire. His bill should be defeated. 



BOOK NOTES AND REVIEWS. 



THE Crisis of the Revolution^ being 
the story of Arnold and Andre, now 
for the first time collected from all sources, 
and illustrated with views of all places 
identified with it, by William Abbatt. 
Illustrations from original photographs by 
Edwin S. Bennett. 

A quarto volume of 250 pp. 10x12. In 
this most elaborately gotten up volume 
Mr. Abbatt has done a splendid work, 
his object being to present in complete 
form in one book the itinerary and epi- 
sodes of that conspiracy which came so 
near being successful and which, had it 
been, would have changed entirely the 
whole course of our history. Especially 
complete has the author made the illustra- 
tions leaving out nothing of any import- 
ance that could be procured relating to 
the events and inserting many maps from 
authentic surveys which give everything in 
detail. One is impressed in the perusal 
of this book with the immense amount of 
research involved. All documents per- 
taining thereto are given, some in fac- 
simile and many things never before 
published. 

Notably interesting among the docu- 
ments is the one reproduced in fac-simile 
from Gen'l Washington to Col. Nath'l 
Wade, apprising the latter of Arnold's 
treason and probably the first words writ- 
ten by Washington on the subject. There 
are many pictures of places and houses 
never before published and a reproduc- 
tion of a sketch of Arnold by Trumbull 
that is interesting. 

The text gives a clear idea of the 
importance of these occurrences of the 
many narrow escapes of discovery of the 
plot, and settles many a hitherto discussed 
question — as for instance the exact time 
and place that Washington first heard of 
Arnolds treason — beyond a doubt. We 
would that there were more of such 
straightforward exhaustive accounts of our 
important historical events. 



The edition is limited to 250 numbered 
and signed copies. Price, ^20.00 each. 
WiUiam Abbatt, 281 Fourth Ave., New 
York, N. Y. 

In the Connecticut Quarterly, No. 3, 
Vol. I, there appeared a short article by 
Mr. Frank L. Hamilton on The Henry 
Lee Argonauts of 1849. ^ paper was 
printed on board the ship by Rev. L. J. 
Hall, chronicling the events of the trip as 
they transpired. In the lapse of half a 
century these sheets have become mostly 
scattered and lost, and Rev. Mr. Hall has 
republished them now in book form. It 
is a faithful portrayal of not only the 
experiences of the members of the 
" Hartford Union Mining and Trading 
Co.," but gives a picture of those times 
that shows what must have been similar 
experiences of the thousands who went 
around the Horn in '49. 

Not the least interesting is the descrip- 
tion of the life of some of the company in 
California after they landed. The book 
is illustrated with numerous half-tones. 
Price ^i.oo. Rev. Linville J. Hall, Weth- 
ersfield, Conn. Smith and McDonough, 
Hartford, Conn. 



The Sunny Life of an Invalid by C. 
Howard Young, of Hartford, is an inter- 
esting and unique autobiography. What 
must be the life, one thinks, of a man 
who for more than a quarter of a century 
has been an invahd and for the last fifteen 
years has been confined to his bed. Yet 
Professor Young has found much to make 
life pleasant, and he tells his story in a 
bright way. The suggestion advanced in 
one chapter is worth pondering upon. He 
believes that much may be done to alle- 
viate the sufferings of the sick, both physi- 
cal and mental, by the right use of music 
in the sick room. Price, ^i. 



PUBLISHERS' NOTES. 



OUR ADVERTISERS CONTEST. 

As an inducement to advertisers to use 
The Connecticut Magazine, and in order 
to stimulate an active and critical interest 
among our readers in our advertising pages, 




POPE MFG. CO. 



Price $75.(1(1 
HARTFORD, CONN. 



The judges appointed to decide the con- 
test were Miss Kate E. Griswold, Publisher 
Profitable Advertising, Mr. J. Roland Mix, 
Advertising Manager of Scribner's Magazine 
and Mr. Ernest F. Birmingham, Publisher of 
The Fourth Estate. At a recent meeting 
in New York the. prizes were awarded as 
follows : 

First prize : To the page advertisement 
of the Pope Manufacturing Company, set- 
ting forth the merit of the Columbia Chain- 
less Bicycle. Second prize : To the half- 
page advertisement of tne Norfolk and New 
Brunswick Hosiery Company, advertising 
full fashioned underwear. Third prize : To 
the " Little Shavers " page advertisement of 
the J. B. Williams Company. The winning 
advertisements are reproduced herewith and 
will give our readers something worth study- 
ing in the shape of illustrated advertising. 

The judges decided that favorable men- 
tion should be made of the advertisements 
of the Williams & Carleton Co., Hartford, 
L. E. Pike & Co., Hartford, H. H. Todd 
Corset Co., New Haven, Ct., New Haven 
Leader, New Haven, Conn., Meriden Brit- 
tania Co., Meriden, Ct., A. Mugford, Hart- 
ford, Hartford Steam Boiler Inspection and 



WINNER OF FIRST PRIZE, 



we offered three prizes a few months ago for 
the three most attractive and meritorious 
advertisements appearing in our Christmas 
issue. The offer awakened considerable inter- 
est among advertisers and as a result there 
appeared in that issue over one hundred 
advertisements. Not all of these advertisers 
took space as competitors for prizes, but to 
get a legitimate publicity in selling their 
goods. As a result some of the ads. con- 
tained a much greater degree of merit than 
others, many being of an unusual excellence 
that created general admiration among our 
readers. 




WINNER OF SECONO PRI/K. 

Insurance Co., Hartford, G. F. Heublein & 
Bro., Hartford, and the Windsor C^oUar and 



PUBLISHERS' NOTES.— Continued. 



Cuff Co., Windsor, Ct. and Chicago, 111., 
Colonial Pen Co., Boston., and Stephen F. 
Whitman & Son, Philadelphia. 

The judges are three of the most compe- 
tent authorities in the country on advertising 




:s 



^ ,^' 




Little Shavers and Big ShaVCrS 



IMS- SHAVIHC 



WINNER OF THIRD PRIZE. 



matters, and we take this opportunity to 
thank them for the attention and uniform 
courtesy shown The Connecticut Magazine 
in deciding this contest. 



Beginning with the January number The 
Connecticut Magazine instituted a new 
department devoted exclusively to the 
colleges of the state. A full page every 
month will be devoted to each institution. 
The articles will be appropriately illustrated 
and will consist of descriptions of new build- 
ings, athletic teams, individual students of 
prominence, general college news, in fact 
of anything of conspicuous interest. The 
department is in charge of an alumnus of one 
of our colleges, who was for some time editor- 
in-chief of one of the prominent college maga- 
zines, and who is familiar with collegiate 
journalism. The articles published will be 



sent direct from the colleges by special cor- 
respondents, and will, for the most part, be 
of the nature of signed communications. 
This means up-to-date matter, written by 
competent undergraduates who are person- 
ally in touch with what they write of. The 
correspondents secured from Yale and Trinity 
are present managing editors of influential 
publications, and thus our readers will have 
the advantage of the work of men thoroughly 
trained in literary and journalistic study. 
From time to time selected fragments of rep- 
resentative verse will be published, taken 
from the college magazines. We hope by 
these features to furnish a department which 
will serve somewhat as a combined college 
publication, and one of interest to the general 
reader and to the college students themselves. 



The publishers desire to call attention to 
the department under the title "The Home," 
that began in the January number. This 
new feature will appear in each issue for the 
year and will be under the editorship of Miss 
Louise W. Bunce, a lady well known in Hart- 
ford society. It is designed to make this 
department of great value in all that apper- 
tains to the science of housekeeping in its 
various phases of entertainment, economy 
and marketing. 

Note. The title of engraving on page 89 
should read, "Where Percival had his oflEice." 



The popularity of The Connecticut 
Magazine since its advent five years ago as 
The Connecticut QuarterIvY may be 
attributed largely to the numerous illustra- 
tions with which the publishers have 
brightened its pages. Great care is required 
in making the cuts used in producing the 
magazine ; and we take pleasure in giving 
credit for the excellence of our printing 
plates to the Hartford Engraving Com- 
pany whose place of business is in the 
Courant building, Hartford. This company 
has manufactured the plates used by the 
magazine since its start in 1895. 



TWO NUMBERS IN ONE. 

Subscribers to The Connecticut Maga- 
zine are herewith informed that the March 
and April numbers of The Connecticut 
Magazine will appear under one cover. 
This action is taken in order to gain time in 
issuing future numbers promptly. The delay 
in getting out the January number has caused 
a further delay, and the February number is 
late. The situation necessitates the step we 
have taken in justice to our readers, our 
advertisers and ourselves. 



KIPIvING'S WORKS FREE. 

Ten years ago Rudyard Kipling was a 
reporter on a little country newspaper in the 
backwoods of India. He had written short 
stories and poems — wonderful stories and 
blood stirring poems — that had been printed 
in the Indian press, and delighted the few 
Englishmen-in ludia, but the world of letters, 
and the great English world of action knew 
him not. He went to England to get a start, 
but the English publishers bowed him out. 
He then called on the American agent of an 
American publisher in London, who had faith 
enough in him to republish his Indian work, 
and honesty enough to pay him a royalty, 
although it was not protected by copyright. 
Just as his first book came from the American 
press, the New York Sun reprinted his story 
of "THE MAN WHO WAS," "the greatest 
ever written." It was copied from the Sun 
into over three thousand daily, Sunday, 
and weekly newspapers of this country. 
Then followed the " INCARNATION OF 
KRISHNA MULVANEY," which almost 
every paper in the land republished. Both 
press and people went Kipling mad Never 
had they read such stories. Never before had 
they been written. The four volumes issued 
by his American publisher, unprotected by 
copyright, were raided, and it was considered 
a poor issue in 1890 when the greatest or the 
smallest of American weeklies had not a 
Kipling poem or a Kipling story. His name 
was a household word in the United States 
from the Atlantic to the Pacific, in city, town, 
and hamlet, before an English publisher took 
him up, and it was the American craze for him 
that made them do it. It is true that the 
American newspapers reprinted his uncopy- 
righted Indian stories, and that he only 
received a few thousand dollars from his 
American publisher for his old and unpro- 
tected work which the newspapers and pirat- 
ical publishers "lifted," but he was advertised 
by the newspapers as no author was ever before 
advertised since the world began, and it is to 
that advertising — for which he never paid 
them a cent — he owes the fact that for his 
work since then he has been paid fabulous 
prices, and that he could afford to refuse an 
offer of $1 GOO for a story of 1,000 words. The 
market prices for original copies of his first 
editions in the simple pamphlet form in which 
they were issued in Calcutta in 1886-89 are now 
fabulous. Greater than any writer ever 
enjoyed in such a short time. "SOLDIERS 
THREE " is held at ^65 a copy; " DEPART- 
MENTAL DITTIES,^' 1886, |5i6o acopy WEE 
WILLIE WINKIE, " ^24 00; But now, through 
the co-operation of a powerful syndicate of 
papers, they are all within your reach for a 
few cents. 

Wolcott Balestier, Mr. Lovell's agent in 
London, who " discovered " Kipling when he 
was wandering around discouraged and dis- 
gusted with the British publishers, introduced 
him to Mr. Henry James, the famous Ameri- 
can author, who writes a charming introduc- 
tion for this edition, and no one will quarrel 
with him if he takes credit as a prophet 




Can Yon Do It? < 
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Take Laxative Bromo Quinine Tablets. 
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75 COMPLETE 
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In order to introduce our large 64 column 
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Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



because what lie said of Kipling's genius in 
the introduction to the first American volume 
in 1891, has proven exactly true. 

The Connecticut Magazine Co., has on 
hand a limited number of copies of No. i, 1896, 
Nos I, 2, 3, and 4 of 1897 and Nos. i and 2 of 
1898 Connecticut Quarterlies and Nos. i, 2, 
3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, II and 12 of the Connecticut 
Magazine. As set forth in our advertising 
pages, we will offer while they last any one 
of the above mentioned Quarterlies or any 
two of the Connecticut Magazines together 
with any one of the Volumes of Kipling's 
works for 25 cents. 

The Kipling volume is absolutely free. 
If the seventeen back numbers of the Quarterly 
and Magazine are desired we will give the 
buyer the 15 volumes complete of Kipling's 
Works. The price for the whole being I3.00. 

This is an offer seldom equaled and should 
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your library uhen they are bound. 

WE BIND THEM in Russia Back and Comers, 
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Per Volume of one year. 

In Turkey Morocco Back and Corners, as above, $1.35 

All kinds and qualities of Magazine Binding. 

Blank Books of every description with tlat opening backs. 

The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co., 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



Please mention Thk Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



KIPLING'S WORKS FREE!! 




VOL.UME I. Mine Own People. Introduction by Henry James. — Bimi. — Namgay Doola. — The Recru- 
descence of Imray.— Moti Guj, Mutineer. — The Mutiny of the Mavericks. — At the i^nd of the Passage. — The 
Incarnation of Krishna Mulvaney. — The Man Who Was. — On Greenhow Hill. 

VOLUME II. Plain Tales from the Hills. Thirty-nine Stories. 

VOI.UME III. The I.ight Tliat Failed. 

VOr.UME IV. Soldiers Three. The God from the Machine.— Private I^earoyd's Story.— The Big Drunk 
Draft.- The Solid Muldoon.— With the Main Guard.— In the Matter of a Private.— Black Jack.— Only a Subal- 
tern. Printed from the first edition of 1888, which now sells at $65 a copy, 

VOIiUME V. The Phantom 'Kickshaw. My Own True Ghost Story.— The Strange Ride of Morrowbie 
Jukes.— The Man Who Would Be King. 

VOI.UME VI. Story of the Gadshys. Poor Dear Mama.— The World Without.— The Tents of Kedar. 
—With Any Amazement. — The Garden of Eden. — Fatlma. — The Valley of the Shadow. — The Swelling of Jodan. 

VOLUME VII. The t'ourting of Dinah Shadd. A Conference of the Powers.— City of Dreadful Night. 
The first Indian edition is held at $27.50 a copy. 

VOtrUMK VIII. In Black and "White. Dedication.— Introduction.— Dray Wars Yow Dee.— The Judg- 
ment of Dungara.— At Howil Thana.— Gemini.— At Twenty-two.— At Flood Time.— The Sending of Dana Da.— On 
the City Wall. The first Indian edition is now held at $24 a copy. 

VOLUME IX. Under the Deodars. The Education of Otis Yeere.— At the Pit's Mouth.— A Wayside 
Comedy. — The Hill of Illusion.— A Second-Rate Woman. — The first Calcutta edition is now sold at $24 a copy 

VOLUME X. "Wee Willie Winkie. Baa, Baa, Black Sheep.— His Majesty the King.— The Drums *of the 
Fore and Aft. — Without Benefit of Clergy. The first Calcutta edition now held for $24 a copy. 

VOLUME XI. American Notes. Sixteen Chapters. 

VOLUME XII. Letters 01 Marque. Nineteen I^etters. Smith Administration, 18 Chapters, The first 
Indian edition of 1891 is now sold at I50 a copy. 

VOLUME XIII. Letters from the East. 

VOLUME XIV. Departmental Ditties. Including The Vampire, The Recessional, The Three Captains. 

VOLUME XV. Barrack Roona Ballads. Including Danny Deever and Mandalay. 

THIS CHARMING SET OF HIS WORKS i^^ fifteen volumes, is^an ideal edition. In size it is 

unique, a tall lomo — the i2mo size is too large for the 
pocket — and this "just fits." The type is large, long primer, larger than any daily newspaper uses for editorial, 
and made especially for this edition. The paper is the finest used in book work, the ink is the best, and the 
presswork is so carefully and daintily done that each page is a typographical delight to the eye. The whole set 
contains over 3,000 pages. 

The bindings of this edition are something new in bookmaking, a patent thread sewing w^hereby the same 
effect is obtained as in the cross-stitching the Oxford Teachers' Bible, so that it can be opened the width and 
bent back until the covers meet without straining it. 

The edition is daintily bound in delicately tinted linen, half-flexible, which will wear like iron. The 
embossing is attractive, with title in gold, and suitable for preservation in the library. 

No expense has been spared— divided among the million sets it did not matter what expense was gone to — 
to make this the ideal edition for the people. 

WE HAVE ON HAND a limited number of copies of No. i, 1896, Nos. i, 2, 3 and 4 of 1897, and Nos. i and 
2 of 1898 Connecticut Quarterlies and Nos. i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, 11 and 12, 1899, of The Connecticut Magazine, 

By Special Arrangement with the Frank F. I^ovell Co., 
Publishers, of New York, we are able to offer 

ANY ONE OF THE ABOVE VOLUMES OF KIPLING'S WORKS, together with any one of the 

above mentioned Quarterlies or 

ANY TWO of the above mentioned Connecticut Magazines for 25 Tents. Or, A COMPI.ETE SET OF 15 VOI.S. 
Kipling's Works, together with the 18 Numbers of Quarterlies and Magazines for $3.00. 



THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE, Hartford, Conn. 



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and AliL NATTJRA'r. POWERS FUL,L.Y KESTOKET*. Our free trial treat nteiit alone oures Ir.nulreds of 
cases, and will be 7iiailed free to niiv jvMson sull'ering fron\ a drug habit. The only seientitle home treatment con- 
taining the ACTIVE LIFE PRINCIPLE. The most diftleult eases sueeessfully tre.-ite.l ; perfect be.-tUb rcstor<«d: 
results absolute' v spt-. aU eon.numications strlctlv eonl'deutlal. Address H031E TREATMENT CO^ 
48 West 24th St., New York City, or J. C. MeALPINE, at same a«idress. 

IfOiai a feiu of our patifitts say : *' Sample just ffoiio ; It Is two weeks sinco 1 have touohe«l the drn-t." 



*•! have not used one single drop of 
the morphine, and have not suffered 
one bit; In faet, every day have felt 
better and better." 



'* I hardly know how to write you. I 
feel so leratefiil. so thankful. I liuvc 
taken the medleine exactly as pre- 
scribed, and how It has helped me." 



•* 1 urn more ttuiii plense«l wKh the 
n«siilt. 1 ro*t at nlslit splendidly and 
have no pain. Oh. what a <Jod-send 
to those afl1«"»"'« >«•» I have been." 



Please mention The CoNNECTicur Magazine when you write to advertisers. 




Who Has Catarrh? 

A COMMON-SaiSE CURE 

TO those who know what Catarrh 
really is, the old-fashioned way 
of treating it, still used by 
thousands who cling to old 
methods, seems a woeful waste of 
good energy. 

Catarrh is inflammation of the 
mucous membranes of the nostrils, 
throat and air passages. 
It needs soothing, not irritating. 
The constant hawking, the chok- 
ing, plugged-up, disagreeable sen- 
sation of tightness — troublesome 
especially in the early morning, 
when the cold air contracts the air 
passages and irritates the inflamed 
membranes — is relieved immediate- 
ly by the simple application of 

OZOJELL 

Ozojell is like a healing ointment applied to a troublesome and angry 
sore — it Soothes, Relieves, Cures. 

The catarrhal discharge is like the pus from a running sore, and 
everyone knows that washing a sore is not sufficient to make it /leal. 

Ozojell, a delicious, pleasant emulsion or jelly of great cleansing, 
healing, preservative, germicidal properties, when once applied, remains 
on the raw membranes and gradually draws out the matter and heals up 
the wound by promoting the growth of new, healthy membrane. 

Ozojell is put up in a patent Ozojell tube, easily carried in the pocket, 
easily applied to the parts as needed, in the office, on the street, without 
attracting attention, and with no irritation, trouble or waste of time. 

It is sold by all druggists in 50 cent patent Ozojell nasal tubes. 

Prepared from the formula of the celebrated Vienna physician, Herr 
J. Muller, the great specialist in diseases of the ear, throat and nose 
(Physician in Ordinary to the Emperor of Austria). 

Thousands of letters from those who have been cured attest its virtues. 

TO PROVE 

its efficacy, we offer to send/r^*? by mail to all readers of this paper a tube 
of Ozojell and a book on Catarrh and Its Scientific Treatment. 

Simply write, giving name and full address, when this treatment will 
be sent you absolutely free, postage paid. Address 

OZOJELL CURE, 465 Temple Court, New York. 



THE MAN WITH THE HOE *' 




should be " up-to-date " in matters relating- to the farm. A 
good Agricultural paper gives the latest improvements in 
farming implements and the best and most economical 
methods of tilling the soil. 

The Connecticut Faemer does this, paying more 
particular attention to the needs of the farmers of this state. 

Our Tobacco Department gives a complete resume of all 
the news of interest to the tobacco grower, also many 
articles on the most improved methods. 

We have a very complete Grange page, giving the 
freshest news from the various Granges. 

Our fubscriptioa price is only $1.00 a year to new sub- 
scribers. Trial subscription of three months. 25 cents. 
A postal will bring you a sample copy. 




HARTFORD, CONN. 



No 

Matter 

What 



• 

your politics may he yotill laugh to 
** split yotif sides ** over JUDGE during 
the campaign of J900. JUDGE has 
politics in pictures for the politician, 
humor for the humorist, and all-around 
good-natured satire for everybody. 
JUDGE^S cartoons are features of every 
political contest that a good American 
should not miss, 

JUDGE is published weekly and is 
to be found the world over. It is sold 
at JO cents per copy, or by the year 
at $5.00. 

Remember, please, that 

Judge is 
the Prince of 
Caricaturists 



The 
We 
We 



Readers 
have- 
hold! 



This is an age of education. No other nation on The 
face of the globe is so intelligent as ours, and 
intelligence makes a nation prosperous and 
happy. Education gives a young man the best 
chance in life. The easiest and cheapest way to 
educate yourself and your children, irrespective of 
the schools and colleges, is by having the best 
current reading in your house. 



THE GREATEST FAMILY NEWSPAPER IS 



Si^EEKLY 



Leslie's Illustrated Weekly. 

It tells the story of contemporaneous events and illustrates it with the most 
artistic pictures. He who reads it every w^eek learns to recognize the counte- 
nances of the noblest men and women in public and 
in private life; the appearance of the w^orld*s most 
famous places, and the scenes of the greatest historic 
interest. 

LESLIE'S WEEKLY is a paper to keep on the 
library table, and to read and reread, and to file away 
for useful reference. It is read by more families of 
culture and refinement among the masses than any 
other paper of its class in the world. It is the greatest, 
best, most attractive and cheapest of all American 
educators. 

It is for sale everywhere — on the stands, in the 
bookstores, on all trains, at I O cents per copy. 

LESLIE'S WEEKLY, no Fifth Avenue, New York. 

Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 




TO NEW YORK DAILY 




Stopping at all Connecticut Rlyer Landings. 



LOW RATES. 

Quick Dispatch. 

Passenger and 
Freight lyine. 



SECURITY. 

COMFORT. 

REFRESHING 
SLEEP. 



Passenger Accommodations First Class. 

Shipments received on pier in New York until 6 p. 
m. and forwarded to all points mentioned on Connecti- 
cut river, and points North, East and West from Hart- 
ford. We also have through traffic arrangements with 
lines out of New York or points South and West, and 
shipments can be forwarded on through rates, and 
Bills of Lading obtained from offices of the Company. 
For Excursion Rates see daily papers. 

Hartford and New York 
Transportation Co.^ 

Steamers " Middletown " and "Hartford" — 
Leave Hartford from foot vState St. at 5 p. m.— Leave 
New York from Pier 24, East River, at 5 p. m. — Daily 
except Sundays. 



DIRECT ROUTE to the WEST 

with only one change of cars between 
Hartford and Chicago. 




The shortest, cheapest and most convenient route. 
Train leaves Hartford at 12.40 P. M., connects at ', 
Campbell Hall with fast express over O. W. and 
Wabash road, arriving at Chicago next day 9 P, M. | 
Only one night on road. I 

CENTRAL NEW ENGLAND RAILWAY. 

Poughkeepsie Bridge Route. 

For information apply to 

W. J. MARTIN, Qen'l Passenger Agent, 
Hartford, Conn. 



>WV%>%^'%'WWWWWWV%VWW«^^^^^«^«^^ 



MAGAZINES FREE. 

To assist the publishers of The Connecti- 
cut Magazine in obtaining addresses of per- 
sons who are natives of, or have an interest 
in Connecticut matters, we ask those of our 
readers, who have relatives or friends who 
are not subscribers, to fill out as many such 
names and addresses as possible on the 
blanks below, cut out and mail to The 
Connecticut Magazine office. We will mail 
a sample copy of the Connecticut Magazine 
postpaid all addresses given us. On receipt 
of same we will refund whatever postage was 
required for sending us list. 

Name 

Address 

Name. -..,... 

Address 

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"Boys, its the ^ « « « 
COLUMBIA CHAINLESS 

everywhere this year." '^ « 




The nickled "Face Plate" on the Columbia Chainless crank bracket 
is destined to become as familiar a sight on city streets and country 
roads as the Columbia "Name Plate "is to-day. 

The Columbia Chainless for 1900, reduced in weight and greatly im- 
proved, is the only bicycle perfectly adapted to all conditions of riding. 
For the business man, the woman rider, the tourist, the racing man 
it is equally desirable. 

Columbia, Hartford, Stormer and Pennant 

Chain wheels for 1900 are unequalled by any bicycles at their 

prices. All of these machines carry our regular guarantee. 

Prices $75, $60, $50, $35, $30, $25. 

American Bicycle Co., POPE SALES DEPT., 

HARTFORD, CONN. 

Columbia and Stormer catalogues free of any Columbia or Stormer 
dealer, or by mail for two cents each. 





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TRe Boston 

^^^1^ Tea Party 

"Was an immense success. Had King 
George.sent BLACK. PACKAGE RUS- 
SIAN CARAVAN: TEA, instead of 
China tea^ history might have chronicled 
a different disposition of those three car- 
goes in Boston Harbor, 

However, we wish to have a tea party 
and we invite descendants of that other 
gathering to send us 10 cents for one- 
eighth pound package of our Caravan 
Tea, which 'retails at One Dollar per 
pound. 

OUR REASONS? ^ READ THEM. 
Absolute Purity, 

Economical Possibilities, 

General Satisfaction and a 

Healthful Beverage. 



B. FISCHER & CO., 

Tea and Coffee Importers, 
Cor. Beach and Greenwich Sts , NEW YORK. 



P. S. If you prefer, send your name, and 
that of your grocer for a handsome booklet. 




TO ENC6URAGE 

MODERATE 

ADVERTISERS 



The CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE offers the services 
of its artist and desigfner in helping its advertisers 
construct proper and attractive advertisements. 

For Advertisers taking a six months' contract we will 
make an appropriate design and submit to advertiser 
for approval; make a half-tone or line printing plate 
— and write the advertisement-if it is desired : Cut to 
be property of advertiser at expiration of contract. 
This all free of charge in order to bring the advertiser 
the best possible results and to make our advertising 
pages attractive. 

MODERATE RATES. 



SAMPLE FREE to prospective advertisers 



The Connecticut Magazine, 

Hartford, Conn. 



I ONCE USED ALWAYS USED ti5^'"'NEWLEAF 

NSMITH PREMIER ' '^="""^^°' 

T'VDC ' PREMIER 

(^.u TYPE. 




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Serial Story— THE GLEBE HOUSE.— written by Chauncey C. Hotchkiss, author of " A Colonial 
ree Lance " and " In Defiance of the King."— BEGAN IN JANUARY— C0NCLUDP:D IN AUGUST. 



Vol. VI. March=April, iqoo, 



No. 3. 




c o- 






:^ V n 






: o s;- 



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2 c 



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» 3 



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CT. 3 

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X 2. 



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OLDEST, 
LARGEST, 

AND... 

BEST. 



INSURE IN ... 

The Travelers, 

of Hartford, Conn. 

Life, . . . 
Endowment, 
and Accident 
. . . Insurance 

OF ALL FORMS. 

Health Policies. 

Indemnity for Disability caused by Sickness. 

Liability Insurance. 

Manufacturers and Mechanics, Contractors, 
and Owners of Buildings, Horses, and 
Yehicles, can all be protected by policies in 
The TRATELERS INSURANCE COMPANY. 



ASSETS, 
Liabilities, 



$27,760,511.56 
23.739.827.61 




EXCESS (3>^per cent, basis), 4,020,683-95 

Life Insurance in force, . $100,334,554.00 
Returned to Policy holders, 39,734,920.89 



I. G. BATTERSON, President. 

S. C. DUNHAM, Vice-President. H. J. MESSENGER, Actuary. 

JOHN E. MORRIS, Secretary. E. V. PRESTON, Sup't of Agencies. 

FRED. R. LOYDON, State Agent, Address, Home Office. 



THE 



Connecticut Magazine 



AN ILLUSTRATED BI-MONTHLY. 

Devoted to Connecticut in its various phases of History, Literature, 
Picturesque Features, Science, Art and Industries. 



MARCH-APRIL, 1900. 



Vol. VI. 



CONTENTS. 



No. 3. 



New Britain Institute Library Building. 

New Britain, Illustrated. 

Colonel Zebulon Butler. 

Carol. Poem. 

The Glebe House. Illustrated. 

Miss Ruth Thompson Sperry. 

Berlin : A Sketch. Illustrated. 

Because of You> Poem, 

The Hon. Henry C. Robinson. 

Hon. James Phelps. 

Called Back. 

Our Colleges. 

Song of Action. Poem. 

The Departments. 

Historical Notes and Correspondence. 

Connecticut People Who Interest Us. 

Genealogical Department. 

Editorial Notes. 

Book Notes and Reviews. 

Floriculture. 

The Home. 



(Frontispiece.) 

George C. Atwell. 125 
Anna Conyngham Stevens Krumbhaar . 143 

Elizabeth Alden Curtis. 152 

Chauncey C. Hotchkiss. 153 

Mary S. Tudor. 164 

Rev. Magee Pratt. 167 

Claribel Egbert. 175 

W. H. a Pynchon. 177 

Thomas D. Coulter. 178 

A. H. T. Fisher. 180 

Edited by Cranston Brenton. 181 

W. Harry demons. 185 



Edited by W. H. C. Pynchon. 



Edited by Rev. Magee Pratt. 
Edited by Louise W. Bunce. 



186 
188 
190 
193 
198 
199 
202 



H. Phelps Arms, Editor. 



Edwasd B. Baton, Bosiness Manager. 



All communications should be addressed to The Connecticut Magazine, Hartford, Conn. Remittances 
should be by cliecK, express order, r. O. money order or refjistered letter. Money by mail at sender's risk. We 
promptly acknowledge by postal card all subscriptions received by mail. When change of address is desired give 
both old and new address. Do not subscribe ot a person unknown to you. Our authorised SRents have tall 
credentials. 



$1.00 a Year. 



THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE. 



20 Cents a Copy. 



Published at 66 State St., Hartford, Conn, by The Connecticut Magazine Co. 
COPYRIGHT 1900, BY THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE CO. 



Entered at the Post Office at Hartford, Conn, as mail matter of the second-claaa. 



What Ails Your Hair? 



: : Name 



Upon receipt of 10 cents in silver or stamps and this blank filled out, and enclosing a 
small sample of your hair (4 to 6 hairs) extracted by the roots, we will send you a FREE 
BOTTLE of Cranitonic Hair Food by mail -prepaid and a FREE REPORT upon the condition 
of your hair after scientific microscopical examination by our Bacteriologists. 



City or Town. 
Sex 



State. 
Age. 



'■ Married or Single 

Have you Dandruff? 

Is your hair falling out ?. .. 

How often do you wash it ?. 
'■ Does your scalp itch f 



Is it Greasy or Scaly ? 
Losing color ?..... 



Any odorf. 



Any scaly eruptions f 

Had any serious sickness lately f 

What is the state of your general health ?. 



Hai 
I Wh 



¥\\ 



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3 



MICROB&S HAVB 
*njSTATTACKe» 
TMIS HAIR 



A— The Hair. 
B-The Scalp. 
C— Microbes. 
D— i'ood Gland. 



ra Hair needs food to 

T keep it alive. 

The food should be 
supplied by the 
blood vessels of the 
scalp M^hich run up 
to the hair roots. 

If the roots have 
"'J\ been weakened by 
the attacks of the 
scalp microbe, your 
hair falls sick, falls 
out, turns gray. 

A sure sign of ' 'hair 
disease ' ' is dandruff. 

If dandruff is al- 
lowed to remain it 
smothers the growth 
of your hair. 

Heretofore the 
treatment of diseases 
of the Hair and Scalp 
has been a matter of 
guess-work, without 
.regard to the cause. 

In the laboratories 
of the Cranitonic 
Hair Food Co., of 
New York, the only 
institute in America 
devoted to diseases 
of the hair and scalp, 
the cause of the dis- 
ease is learned by 
means of a Micro- 
scoijical Examina- 
tion and a cure ef- 
fected by exact and 
scieiitiflc methods. 



From an examination of 1,000 different 
samples of human hair no fewer than 
24 different diseases of the hair and scalp 
were identified; many of them contagious 
and dangerous in the extreme. 




THE DANDKUFF MICROBE 

which causes Dandruff, followed by Falling Hair 

and Finally Baldness. 

From Photo-Micrograph by Dr. Fahrlg. 

(.Copyright ia99.) 

FREE HAIR FOOD. 

The advantages of these researches are 
offered free to all our readers, as the 
above Question Blank shows. 

If you wish to be cured of dandruff, to 
save your hair and grow more, write to 

CRANITONIC HAIR FOOD CO., 

526 West Broadway, New York, 

and you will get a free bottle of Cranitonic 
Hair Food, by mail prepaid,yvith. full direc- 
tions for use, and a free report on the con- 
dition of your hair and scalp. 



Please mention Thk Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



..TAPESTRY PAINTINGS.. 

2000 Tapestry Paintings to Choose From* 30 Artists 
Employed, including Gold Medalists of the Paris Salon. 

When in New York don't fail to call and see these paintings. You will be welcomed. Make this 
place a point of interest. We rent Tapestry Paintings. Send 25c, for Compendium of 140 Studies. 

* Artistic Rome Decorations * 



\TT^ can show you effects NEVER before thought 
W C of. and at moderate nric.es too. 



of, and at moderate prices too. 



"VYTL...- have your house decorated and painted by 

W ny inferior workmen, when you can have it 

done by skilled workmen— by artists — for the same 
price. 



Write for Color Schemes, Designs, Estimates. ARTISTS SENT TO 
ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD, to execute every sort of Deco- 
rating and painting. We are educating the Country in Color 
Harmony. 

Wall Paper, Stained Glass, 
Relief, Carpets, Furniture, 
Parquetry Tiles, Window Shades, 
Art Hangings, Draperies, Etc. 



■yVT _ ft "p _ ♦s«t»c ^®^ styles designed by gold medal artists. From 10 
W ail 1 aperb* cents per roll up, bend 50 cents to prepay express- 
age on large sample books and drapery. A quantity of last year's paper 
$1 and $2 per roll ; now 10 and 25 cents. "Will include drapery samples in 
package. See our Antique Metalic, French, Pressed Silks, and Lida effects 
m special colors to match all kinds of woodwork, carpets and draperies. Have 
500 different wall hangings with draperies specially made at our Broomhead 
Mills, Patterson, N. JT, to match. 

P)*»iir»^tH^c ^® have Draperies to match all wall papers from 15 cents 
Lyrapcrl^o* a yard. This is a very important feature to attain the 
acme of artistic excellence in decoration. No matter how much or how 
little you want to spend you must have harmony of form and colorings. 
Write us for samples. Special Silk Draperies made at our Broomhead Mills, 
Paterson, N. J, Encourage Home Industry ? Write us for samples. 

)e 
price 
Book of samples, 10 cents. Send $1.50 for trial "order, for 2 yards of 50-inch 



T'.oi-^dc'ft^TT- l\7r'^f^>t»<<ale We manufacture Tapestry Materials. Sup 
1 ^pCiSiry lVl^li;rid.lo« rlor to foreign goods and half the pric 
Book of samples, 10 cents. ^ - ^- -- ~ 
wide No. 6 goods, worth $3.00 

T\t>r'r\f*Ck\^<\T/> ii.AxT4nt> Upon receipt of U. Mr. Douthitt will answer 
LyCL'Urail Vtf rVUVlCc* any question on interior decorations— color- 
harmony and harmony of form, harmony of wall coverings, carpets, curtains, tiles, furniture, 
gas fixtures, etc. 

Manual of Art Decorations. '^plJIs^Au^d^wiVh fS-page cofored*iCm° 

tions of modern home interiors and studies. Price, $2, If you want to be up in decoration 
send $2 for this book, worth $50. 

C _t. _ _^t Six 3-hour tapestry painting lessons, in studio, $5. Complete written instruc- 
OCnUUl* tions by mail $1. Tapestry paintings rented ; full size drawings, paints, 
brushes, etc., supplied. Nowhere, Paris not accepted, are such advantages offered pupils. 
Send $1 for complete instructions in tapestry painting and compendium of J 40 studies. 

^^r^.Uti♦-k '04A*4*^^».A Ti.^**A^*^c* Over 100 new styles for wall covenngs, at 25 cents 
VjODlin r^rintea IDUrlapS* per yard, 35 inches wide, thus costing the same 
as wall paper at $1 per roll. 240 kinds of Japanese Lida leather papers, at $2 per roll. 
n^Ut««-> A M4- T^M^ ««./««fri- Grecian, Russian, Venetian, Brazilian, Roman, Rococco, 
VJODim rvri lyrapery* Dresden, Festoon College Stripe, Marie Antoinette, 
Indian, Calcutta, Bombay, Delft, Soudan, from 10 cents a yard to 75 cents. 

In order that we may introduce this line of NEW ART GOODS, we will send one yard 
each of 50 different kinds of our most choice Patterns for $7.50. 

John F, Douthitt, Se^vecr"' 

^jH^jt 286 Fifth Avenue New York. Near soth St. 




Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertiser*. 



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THE NEW BRITAIN RECORD. 

Ai.r. The News. 1 Cent. 6 Cents a Week. 
PRINTING OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. Good work, low Prices. 

J. L. DOYLE, 312 Main Street. 



The very latest /^ A TCTfC 
Up-toDate ^/IIVIH 
For Solitaife or Two 
or More Players. ^^ 

Price, - 25 Cents. 



NUMERICA 



Ask your dealer for it or 

write to 

Thomas I. Griffiths, 

Utica, N. Y. 

Price, - 25 Cents. 



THE NEW BRITAIN 
DAILY NEWS 

Wide Awake to all 
local interests and 
general progress. 

SUBSCRIPTION PRICE: Quarterly, $1.50 
Semi-Annual, $3.00; Yearly, $6.00. 



€^^:c^^^. 



h(;tyOiAy: 



S.30 TO 7^.30. 




TAHE ELEVATOFt 







WEIR'S 



MODEL DRILL 
CHUCK 



HAS A POWERFUL GRIP AND 
RUNS PERFECTLY TRUE^ 



NO CHUCK so easily taken apart — unscrew cap and it's done. 



Customers who have tried it say *'it's all i^ight/' 
Write for Circular and Discount. 

Doebler Mfg. Co., Middletown, Conn 

Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to tdyertiser*. 



SKINNER Patent CHUCKS 






x^ath:^:, drix^x^, px^ansr chuck:s 

THE SKINNER CHUCK COMPANY. '''''''' ''t^^tr^^'o^cr^^^^^^^ 



J. A. Traut, Prest 

G. E. Adams, Vice-Prest. 



U. W. Traut, Treas. 
H. C. Hine, Sec'y. 



The Traut & Hine 
M'f'g Co. 

New Britain, Conn., U. S. A,, 

Manufacturers of 

METAL TRIMMINGS for Suspenders and 
Garters and Adams' Patent Fasteners. 



WASHINGTON RED CEDAR DOORS. 



Do you notice how the doors in your home shrink during 
the winter months, and how they swell and stick during the 
summer months. Do you know that Rackliffe Bros, of 
New Britain, Conn., are placing on the Connecticut market 
beautiful doors made of Washington Red Cedar, which are 
guaranteed not to warp, swell or shrink. Handsome, durable, 
inexpensive. Write us for prices. 

Windows, Doors, Blinds, 
Window Frames, Art Glass, 
Polished Plate, Etc. 

nAGKLIriL DnOoif New Britain, Conn.' 



THE AMERICAN RARER GOODS CO., 

KENSINGTON, CONN. 



Manufacturers of PAPER BAGS and ENVELOPES, CONFECTIONERY BAQS, TOBACCO 
BAGS, CIGAR BAGS, CATALOGUE ENVELOPES, PHOTOGRAPHIC ENVELOPES, 
GLOVE and SCARF ENVELOPES, and any special size envelope or paper bag called for. 

We are now making a specialty of JOB PRINTING, and carry 
a stock Of office stationery. WRITE TO US FOR PRICES. 



HALF-TONE 
PHOTO . . . 
WOOD 



ENGRAVING 



ELECTROTYPINC. 

All Done on the Premises. 

A. MUGFORD, 177 Asylum St., Hartford, Gt. 




THE WARNER PHOTOGRAPH COMPANY, 

General 
F*hiotograp tiers. 

View and Portrait Work, Bromide Enlarge- 
ments, Animal Portraiture. Home Portraiture 
of Children a Specialty. 



Expert DEVELOriNG and 
Printing for Amateurs. 



VIEWS OF HARTFORD FOR SALE. 



studio: Stearns' Bide., 76 Pratt St., Hartford, Ct, 



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The Corbin Line of Builders' Hardware 




Is famed for the artistic merit of the designs, 
the excellence in workmanship and finish, and 
originality in construction. 

The assortment is complete. An architect 
can trim a building from cellar to garret, using 
Corbin Goods alone, and thus securing a uni- 
formity of effect he could not get otherwise. 

Designs suited to all styles of architecture, 
and colors in harmony with finish of interiors. 
Special designs made to order. 



P, & F. Corbin, 

New Britain, Conn, 

Front Door Set. 

Design, New York. School, Colonial. NEW YORK. CHICAGO. PHILADELPHIA. 



AMERICAN HOSIERY CO., 

MANUFACTURERS OF 

Fine Knit UNDERWEAR and HOSIERY, ^""'^ '^l^;^^^llTZl.'^^^ 

SIIiK, wool., MERINO, BAI.BRIGGAN, and mixtures of the same. 

A/O BETTER IN THE WORLD. 



Factories : 
NEW BRITAIN, CONN., U. S. A. 



Salesrooms : 
108 & 110 FRANKLIN ST., NEW YORK, I . S. A 



The National Spring Bed Co. 

25 Sudbury St., Boston, Mass. New Britain, Conn. 

The Genuine National Spring 
is acknowlcilgcd to be the most 
comfortable and most dnrablc 
spring made. Sold by all re- 
pntable dealers. 

Get the "GENUINE 

NATIONAL" and be pleased. 




Please mention Th^ Coj^i^^QTigyx MaOAZINE when you write to advertisers. 



THE STANLEY WORKS, ^,„„^,, LTZL'H..6^.r., 

Buttst Hinges, Door Bolts, Blind Trimming Etc. 




Factories : New Britain, Conn. Warehouse : 79 Chambers St*, N» Y* 

VULCAN IRON WORKS, 

Manufacturers of 

REFINED AIR FURNACE MALLEABLE IRON CASTINGS 

OF EVERY DESCRIPTION. 




Air Furnace Iron a Specialty. 



NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 



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The Connecticut Magazine 



Vol. 6. 



March- APRIL, 1900. 



Nos. ^-4. 



^ 



NEW BRITAIN. 



BY GEORGE C. ATWELL. 



IT has' been said that " A town contains 
the embryo of all that it can be- 
come," and though no prophet of early 
times would have ventured so then ap- 
parently wild a prediction that New 
Britain would become what it has by 



1900, we can see by its history that from 
those days of 1687, when " Richard Sey- 





COI.. ISAAC I.KE. 



REV. JOHN SMALLEV. 

mour and others" came to C~ireat Swamp 
parish and built their stockade on Chris- 
tian Lane, down through the years of each 
half century succeeding, the community 
was composed of men. who, strong of 
purpose and persistent in endeavor, car- 
ried to successful issue their work, so that 



125 



126 ^EW BRITAIN. 

the results which we see in the present 
city were made possible. 

Those worthy pioneers of 1687, for 
eighteen years, on each Sabbath walked 
nine miles over the mountains through 
the woods by the narrow Indian trail 
winter and summer, — some of the women 




THE OLD WEI^I. — CHRISTIAN LANK. 
(vSite of first settlement in Great Swamp Parish.) 

with children in arms, the men guarding 
front and rear with loaded guns, — to at- 
tend public worship at the meeting house 
in Farmington. If this Httle walk was 
regarded by them as a pleasant diversion 
from the more arduous duties of the week, 
it had evidently become monotonous by 



* " New Britain in the Days of the Revolution," by Mrs. 
and Vol. II, No. i, Connecticut Quarterly. 



1705, for in that year they petitioned for 
and obtained the establishment of a sep- 
arate society at Great Swamp, and in 
1 71 2 a church was organized. The parish 
spread to the northwest, until in 1754 
New Britain became a separate ecclesi- 
astical society with about the same bound- 
aries as the town now has, and was 
— 1 named in honor of Great Britain 
by Colonel Isaac Lee, the chief 
magistrate and foremost man in the 
society. There were then about 
i sixty houses within its limits and 
from that date, or from about 1750, 
the history of New Britain might 
be said to have fairly begun. In 
' 1758 Rev. Dr. John Smalley was 
settled as pastor and for over fifty 
years he ministered unto the people. 
For the first half century, or until 
1800, the growth of the society 
was slow, the increase in popula- 
tion being but about five hundi ed 
in the fifty years. But they were 
years of importance ; years when 
the foundations of the future city 
were being laid ; though slowly 
none the less surely. They were 
the years of Dr. Smalley and Col. 
Lee ; the years of the Stanley, the 
Judd, the Hart, the Andrews, the 
North and a few kindred families. 
Years when the hills and unfer- 
tile fields and swamps and rugged 
conditions generally were develop- 
ing a rugged people. A descrip- 
tion of those times has been given 
in former numbers of this maga- 
zine,* so it is unnecessary to refer 
to them here, except briefly. The present 
center of the city was farming land with 
its share of swampy ground, a few houses 
here and there, and in each of the four 
directions at varying distances of from 
one to three miles the scattered settle- 
ments of the ' Harts * to the south, the 
C. I. Parker, Vol. I, No. 4, 



NEW BRITAIN. 



27 



Andrews to the west, the Stanleys to the 
north, and the famiUes living on East 
Street, then the principal business center 
of the place, to the east. Most of the 
people were farmers, but there were the 
beginnings of manufacturing in the small 
blacksmith shops; saw and grist mills 
were becoming common ; there were 
numerous distilleries to produce the 
wherewithal to quench the raging thirst 
o f a generation whose 
parched throats required 
plentiful libations ; and tin- 
ware was being manufactured 
on East Street by the Pater- 
sons, who were the first to 
make it in this country. 

Educational affairs were 
now beginning to feel the 
effect of the increased growth 
of the town. Among the 
noted men engaged in this 
work was Dr. Smalley, famous 
as a teacher as well as a 
divine. There came to him 
as his pupils many who 
afterward , became prominent 
in state and nation. Among 
these were Oliver Ells- 
worth, of Windsor, who be- 
came a chief justice of the 
United States ; Jeremiah 
Mason, of Lebanon, Conn., 
attorney general of New 
Hampshire and a United 
States senator ; Ebenezer 
Porter, President of Andover 
Theological Seminary ; Na- 
thaniel Emmons, a minister for over 
seventy years, and whose published works 
numbered one hundred and fifty volumes ; 
Abijah Carrington, state senator and 
-comptroller ; Rev. Andrew Rawson, a 
noted evangelist and revivalist, who con- 
verted Owen Brown, the father of John 



Brown, and Dr. Titus Coan, the famous 
missionary to the Sandwich Islands ; and 
many others were the pupils of this man 
whose influence and painstaking care in 
all his work was thus perpetuated through 
the years to follow. Under such condi- 
tions was developed a keen intellectual 
life, which, united with the thrifty habits 
of the times made its mark in the in- 
dustrial life of the community. It was in 




THE OLD STONE vSTORE. 

the latter part of the eighteenth century 
that some of the men who made such an 
impress upon the next generation, whose 
works are even now felt, were born. 
Chief among these were Seth J. North 
and Joseph Shipman, both born in 1779. 
In iSoo these two men were twentv-one 



128 



NEW BRITAIN. 




FIRST CONGREGATlONAI. CHURCH. 

years of age, and each, having learned 
the blacksmith's trade, was entering busi- 
ness for himself. 

New Britain saw the dawn of the nine- 
teenth century with less than a thousand 
inhabitants, its manufacturers travelling 
to New York or Boston markets on horse- 
back with their finished wares in saddle 
bags and bringing back the raw material 
for more goods. Their business pros- 
pered and their factories were enlarged, 
though by our present day standards they 
would be primitive indeed. Fifty years 
later, in 1850, nearly a century after the 
incorporation of the place as a separate 
society, and the year of its incorporation 
as a separate town, the population was 
but a few over 3,000. But it was during 
the first fifty years of the nineteenth cen- 



tury that the permanancy of the city's 
future growth was assured. The evolu- 
tion towards its ultimate position as a 
manufacturing center had begun. Dur- 
ing these years water and steam power 
were introduced, and the North brothers, 
the Lees, Timothy W., Augustus, Henry 
and Frederick T. Stanley, William H. 
Smith, C. B. Erwin and others began 
their careers as manufacturers. 

Until 1822, when a new meeting 
house was built by the First Eccles- 
iastical Society, their first edifice, built 
in 1756, near the west end of Smalley 
Street, was the only church building 
in the village. Just prior to 1830, 





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BAPTIST CHURCH. 



NEW BRITAIN. 



129 



odists and Episco- 
palians having houses 
o f worship, and the 
Congregationalists o r 
First Ecclesiastical So- 
ciety having their new 
edifice on the present 
site of the Burritt 
School. The corner 
stone of this church is 
now in the wall under 
the ell part of O. S. 
Judd's house, corner of 
West Main and Wash- 
ington streets. The 
best picture of these 
times in New Britain we 
can give is from an in- 
teresting paper of per- 
sonal recollections pre- 
pared and read by Mr. 
the place began to take on a more Charles Peck before the Saturday Night 
cosmopolitan air, the Baptists, Meth- Club a few years ago, by whose kind 




ST. MARK'S BPISCOPAI, CHURCH. 




SOUTH CONGRHGATIONAI, CHIRCII. 



I30 



NEW BRITAIN, 




ST. MARY'S R. C. CHURCH AND PARISH HOUSK. 



permission we are enabled to quote : 
** My recollection/' writes Mr. Peck, 
"goes back to the time when An- 
drew Jackson was president. The old 
fashioned fire place, with its crane and 
brick oven and back log, was about giving 
way to the modern cook stove. The sul- 
phur match had already supplanted the 
flint and steel. The tallow dip or small 




TRINITY M. E. CHURCH. 



oil lamp was the only means for lighting 
but the foot-stove was still in use. 
The foot stove, fed by generous coals, 

From the home hearth aglow, 
Gave genial comfort to the soles 

Exposed to icy woe. 
Then sweet contentedness prevailed, 

With no more shrinking dread, 
And though cold airs the crown assailed 

The feet came out ahead. 



" New Britain was a small 
isolated village off the main 
lines of travel. Newington. 
Berlin and Plainville were of 
more importance commer- 
cially, and the last two were 
larger than New Britain. The 
only communication we had 
with the outside world was by 
means of the stage coach or 
private teana. A stage coach 
to Hartford three times a 
week and sometimes daily, 
although it did not pay to 
make daily trips, driven by 
George Hart, took passen- 
gers at twenty-five cents a 



NEW BRITAIN. 



131 




SKTH J. NORTH 

head. The Hartford and New Haven 
railroad had not been built, but was in 
process of construction. The matter of 
bringing the railroad through New Britain 
was discussed by the fathers of the place. 
It was a mooted question whether the 
road should come through New Britain or 
along nearer to Berlin. The men of New 
Britain were as a general thing poor and 
unable to take stock in the enterprise. 
But a wealthy citizen of Berlin settled the 
question of location by a liberal subscrip- 
tion to the capital stock on condition of 
the road passing through Berlin. So as a 




compromise and because the land damage 
was light the road was located through 
the swamp between the two places. I 
would remark here that the farmers were 
generally opposed to the railroad as it 
would cut through the farms, cheapen the 
value of horses, and some said the cars 
would frighten the sheep and the smoke 
would blacken their wool. A station for 
New Britain was located at the Newing- 
ton crossing about one and a half miles 
distant east. All passenger trains then 
stopped there. I recall my first ride to 
Hartford on the steam cars. The car was 
not much better equipped than our present 






^ 



FRKDKRICK T. STANI.KY 



CORNElvirS B. ERWIN. 

baggage or freight cars. Seats were ar- 
ranged along the sides. There were no 
springs, and we were jolted over a flat 
rail at the rate of a mile in four minutes. 
The station in Hartford was at the foot of 
Mulberry Street. A small steam boat 
plied between Hartford and Xew York, 
and a still smaller one with paddle wheel 
astern took passengers and merchandise 
from the head of sloop navigation to 
Springfield and way stations. At this time 
(1835) New Britain had a population of 
about 1,200 and Hartford less than 
10,000. Then the parishes of New 
Britain and Kensington made up the 
town of Berlin. Town elections were 



132 



NEW BRITAIN. 




HOT^I, B.USSWIN. 

held successively in each parish, and to provide motive power for the new brick 
usually at the Congregational meeting factory which Major North had built at 
houses." the corner of Park and Elm streets, — now 
The topography of the place at that known as Sargent's block, — he had con- 
time Mr. Peck thus describes : '' In order ceived the idea of utilizing the water 




BOOTH'S CORNER. 



NEW BRITAIN. 



133 



which came through what is now Lock 
Shop Pond and ran across Main street 
just in the rear of the Baptist church. He 
constructed a canal which came across 
and under Main street, where the railroad 
now crosses, and led to a reservoir on 
Elm street which was drained off a few 
years since. From the reservoir the water 
was conveyed through a canal to the fac- 
tory where a sufficient head was obtained 



On each side of this road Mr. North set 
out a row of elm trees, some of which 
are now standing. I speak of this road 
more particularly as it seemed to mark a 
new era of progress in the village and 
illustrated the public spirit and enterprise 
of one of our leading citizens. It was 
apparently the first attempt at anything 
like a straight line in road building in the 
place. Most of the roads were narrow 




MAIN STRKET, WEST SIDE, OPPOSITE CENTRAI, PARK. 



to drive the water-wheel. This factory 
was one of the first in New Britain driven 
by water power. In carrying out the 
enterprise, Mr. North planned a new 
road, now Elm street. 

" All west of this road was a bog swamp 
nearly up to Main street and usually 
flooded over in the spring time. The 
road was laid out straight as an arrow 
from North's corner to East Main street. 



and crooked and little better than cart 
paths. There were then no roads leading 
easterly from Elm street except East 
Main and Park streets. All the ground 
east to Stanley street was pasture, wood- 
land and meadow. On the low land where 
now the New York & New England and 
Berlin branch tracks come together there 
was a dense forest of white birches and 
alder. This i:jround was called Peat 



134 



NEW BRITAIN. 




SOI.DIERS MONUMENT. 

swamp and the remainder of it is now 
seen east of the Union Works. At the 
south of Park Street there was another 
swamp called Cat- tail swamp, from the 
large number of cat-tails that grew in it. 
It has been said that New Britain was 
built on the edge of a swamp. It may 
almost be said to have been built in a 
swamp. There were swamps in every di- 
rection except that part near Walnut hill 
and to the high ground northwest and 
north. Most of these have been drained 
off by the sewers and are now covered 
with buildings. There were the Kensing- 
ton and Berlin roads leading south, the 
Plainville road west, the Farmington and 
Hartford roads north and east, and the 
road east to the present town farm and 
Christian Lane. There were a few strag- 



gling houses along Main 
street, till we came to 
the meeting-house, cor- 
ner of East Main street, 
which seemed to be 
about the center. Here 
were the stone store, the 
post office and the 
tavern, the latter kept 
by Philip Lee. Lock 
Shop Pond was so re- 
tired as to make it a 
favorable place for the 
boys to go in swimming." 
Thinking of it as hav- 
ing been compassed 
within the life of a 
man of fifty years the 
changes that have taken 
place in New Britain 
from 1850 with a popula- 
tion of 3,000, to more 
than 26,000 in 1900, 
seem remarkable. The 
more so when it is known 
to be no mushroom 
growth, but a steady, sub- 
stantial one on a solid basis. It is, how- 
ever, within less than the last quarter of 
the century that the greatest changes 
have taken place in the business sec- 
tion of the city. The young citizen of 
twenty-five can remember that previous 
to 1885 there were scarcely half a dozen 
substantial business blocks on Main 
street ; that wooden, one-story buildings 
were used for stores on Booth's corner, 
on Church street and above the railroad 
track; that old-style houses of the last 
century stood where the Russwin building 
and the brick blocks on the west side of 
Main street now are ; that in the open 
lot on Court street in the center of 
the city Barnum's and Forepaugh's great- 
est shows on earth held forth on alternate 
years ; that there was an eyesore digni- 



NEW BRITAIN. 



135 




Y. M. C- A. BUII.DING. 

fied by the name of a depot on Commer- 
cial street, which had been there so long 
that an alarm of fire from that direction 
brought forth the injunction, " Keep quiet, 
boys, perhaps it's the old depot;" that 
travelers to and from the city on the Ber- 
lin branch were treated to a string of cast 
off coaches so many years 
that the local paper finally 
addressed the superinten- 
dent, — " Don't, Mr. David- 
son, don't ; don't wear your 
old cars out on us and don't 
wear us out on your old 
cars," and the people had 
ample time to reflect that 
they could be sorry but 
once that the main line of 
the railroad had not been 
built through New Britain ; 
and that necessity of to-day, 
the trolley, was unknown 
and unheard of; that even 
the horse cars were not in 
existence, the tramway com- 



pany not being incorporated until 1886, 
and the electric cars not being run until 
1893. The transformation from all this 
within so short a time has shown a spirit 
of enterprise and energy ever character- 
istic of the city and gives it justly a fore- 
most place among those of the slate, 
enabling it to compare favorably with any 
of similar size in the country. 

Though it was not until 1893 that New 
Britain had the trolley system, she was 
one of the first cities in Connecticut to 
introduce it, and has always had a well- 
managed, efficient service. Her genius 
for pioneer work has thus been manifested 
in various movements from those early 
times when tin-ware and numerous artic- 
les of brass and iron were first made in 
the place, down to the present. Not 
alone in matters of material wealth have 
her citizens shown progress, but to that 
higher plane of education and develop- 
ment of the individual has especial atten- 
tion been given. Here in 1792 was formed 
a library association, which, with various 
changes, has become the New Britain In- 
stitute, a public library, which is soon, 
through the beneficence of the late C. B. 



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FIRST BUII^DING OF CONNKCTICUT NORMAL SCHOOL 



136 



NEW BRITAIN. 



Erwin, to be installed in a magnificent 
new building erected for the purpose. 
Immeasurable as the influence of a public 
library is, yet even more important in the 
influence exerted upon the successive 
generations is the work of the teacher in 
the public school. The necessity of a 
careful training of the teacher for that 
work is to-day everywhere recognized, 
but was almost unheard of, when, in 1838 



place into favorable notice from outside 
its borders. 

Their attention thus drawn to educa- 
tional matters may have been the reason 
of another pioneer movement in educa- 
tion, even an innovation, the establish- 
ment of a free high school in 1850, then 
scarcely known in Connecticut. 

It is but a natural sequence that with 
such a history, the standard of education 




conne:cticut normai. schooi.. 



the parish of New Britain subscribed four 
thousand dollars for the establishment of 
a seminary for the education and training 
of teachers. This was followed in 1840, 
through the foresight and public spirit of 
influential townsmen, (notably among them 
Seth J. North and Ethan A. Andrews) in 
the establishment of the State Normal 
School in New Britain, which brought the 



has been high and the people active in 
good works. 

In church history we find that the first 
Sunday school in Hartford County was 
started in the New Britain parish in t8i6 
and from the one church in the Society 
then, when a morning and an afternoon 
freeze was the regular experience every 
winter sabbath, the interest in things re- 



NEW BRITAIN. 



137 




NEW BRITAIN HIGH SCHOOI.. 



ligious has grown until there are now 
many churches and numerous benefit or- 
ganizations in the city. For the record 
in detail of these various organizations, as 
well as of the town's history, the people 
are favored in having the complete and 
accurate works of Alfred Andrews and 



David N. Camp, authors of the Ecclesias- 
tical History of the First Church and 
" New Britain " respectively. Also a 
most comprehensive and scholarly article 
on New Britain, by May Churchill Tal- 
cott, has appeared in the " New Eng- 



land Magazine." 




THE ERWIN WOMAN S HOMP:. 



In 1S71, when 
the town had at- 
tained twenty- o n e 
years o f separate 
corpoiate existence, 
N e w Britain be- 
came a city, vested 
with municipal au- 
thority. 

The arteries 
through which the 
life blood of this 
community tl o w s, 
giving sustenance to 
the majority of the 
population and up- 
on which nearlv all 



138 



NEW BRITAIN. 



its people are dependent are its large 
manufacturing concerns, the outgrowth of 
those small ones of early times. Al- 
though scarcely more in number than of 
thirty years ago, the conservative policy 
of some of the leading citizens not giving 
encouragement to ad- 
ditional industries, the 
business of those then 
established has so grown 
that their demands for 
employees have trebled 
the population of the city 
within the three decades, 
most of the accessions 
having been supplied by 
emigration from the 
European countries. 
Illustrative of the rapid 
growth of the manufactur- 
ing concerns may be cited 
as examples, the P. & F. 
Corbin Co., and the 
Stanley Works. From 
their modest beginnings 
they have, under able 
management, attained in 
a comparatively short 
time an enormous size, 
each covering acres o f 
ground and employing 
hundreds of hands. The 
Corbin company manu- 
factures builders' and 
cabinet hardware in great 
variety and their reputa- 
tion for superior goods is 
second to none in the 
country. Philip Corbin, 
the founder of the busi- 
ness, is still the active manager. The 
vStanley Works manufactures wrought steel 
builders' hardware, butts and hinges 
being among their principal staples, and 
the same policy of making superior goods 
that characterizes New Britain manufac- 



tures in various lines has won for this 
company's products a ready market in all 
parts of the country. The company was 
founded by Frederick T. Stanley and 
since his death, 1883, William H. Hart 
has been president and manager. Of 




NEAR WAI^NUT HII.I, PARK. 

the companies of more recent date may 
be mentioned the Vulcan Iron Works 
started in 1878, having a present capital 
of three times the original one, and mak- 
ing high-grade, refined air-furnace cast- 
ings, largely on bicycle and automobile 



NEW BRITAIN, 



139 



carriage work, but also with a large 
variety of other work. Among other 
concerns of comparative recent date 
which have shown much enterprise and 
growth are the Traut & Hine Mfg. Co., 
makers of varieties of buckles and novel- 
ties ; the Skinner Chuck Co., lathe and 
drill chucks ; the National Spring Bed 
Co., spring beds ; and Rackliffe Brothers, 
sash and door makers. In addition to 



that New Britain is best known in the 
world, it is also from this city that the 
finest products of the knitting frame in 
the shape of underwear and hoisery go 
out into the country. The American 
Hosiery Company was organized by 
John B. Talcott in 1868 and he, as presi- 
dent and treasurer, assisted by K. H. 
Davison as secretary and superintendent, 
have continually maintained a standard 




THE NEW BRITAIN HOSPITAL. 



the above mentioned companies the 
products of Russell & Erwin, North &: 
Judd, Landers, Frary & Clark, and the 
Stanley Rule & Level Co., justify the 
reputation of New Britain as " The 
Hardware City," a city wherein are pro- 
duced articles of iron and brass whose 
name is legion. Although it is from the 
goods made from that market staple, iron, 
the barometer of commercial prosperity. 



of excellence for their goods equal to that 
of English manufacturers, who, before the 
existence of this company, were the 
acknowledged leaders of knit goods in 
the world of textile fabrics. 

To-day we see in New Britain a city 
that is typical of the modern era : an 
attractive business section, with many tine 
buildings, among them the Russwin build- 
ing with its well managed hotel which 



140 



NEW BRITAIN, 



has long been recognized as one of 
the best equipped hostelries in New 
P^ngland ; a central park, with a 
soldiers' monument, the latter not 
of the conventional type but of 
original design and costly con- 
struction ; modern improvements as 
regards water supply and light- 
ing facilities ; pleasant residential 
sections with numerous fine homes ; 
a large park near the center being 
rapidly improved ; and an environ- 
ment of outlying country that is 
full of charm for the driver, rider, 
or pedestrian. 

If not historic ground in itself, that 
unique feature of New Britain, Walnut 
Hill, is nevertheless the place for the 
reader of local history to survey the 
ground vital with the life of over two and 
a half centuries of the white man's oc- 
cupancy. From this commanding emi- 
nence, so near the heart of the present 
city, one looks to the northeast and sees 
the gilded dome of Connecticut's Capitol, 
near the spot where the Rev. Thomas 
Hooker and his company from Cam- 
bridge settled in 1636. From thence 
westerly the distmce is measured with 





EI^IHU BURRITT. 



GIvIMPSE: of I,AKK — SHUTTI.K MEADOW. 

the eye and the imagination wanders over 
that path traversed by the band that went 
from there to the Tunxis Valley in 1640. 
The mountain tops bordering those fertile 
vales on the southeast, those mountain 
tops that were crossed forty-seven years 
later by that company who went to Great 
Swamp, and the distance between, — the 
scene of so many weary sibbath day's 
journeyings, — meet the vision. The pa- 
rishes of New Britain, Worthington and 
Kensington that were set off as the town 
of Berlin in 1785, a century after the 
settlement in Christian Lane, are spread 
upon the landscape beneath in plain sight. 
The mountains to the south and west that 
contribute so much to the scenic beauty 
of this panorama are in turn the border- 
lands of like settlements alive with hu- 
man interest. These reflections running 
through the mind of the observer as an 
under-current, intensifies the appreciation 
of the scene. 

There is always a particular satisfaction 
to the inhabitants of a place in the pos- 
session of men who have become noted 
for beneficent works either at home or 
abroad. Foremost among the men of his 
time devoted to work for humanity, a man 
known the world over for his accomplish- 
ments and his philanthropy, stands the 



NEW BRITAIN. 



141 




KTHAN AI,I,KN ANDRKWS. 

name of one born and reared in New 
Britain and whose last years were passed 
there. The life of Elihu Burritt reads 
like a romance, stranger indeed than fic- 
tion, no beginnings more humble, no 
achievements more glorious. His work 
for the suffering poor, for ocean penny 
postage, for universal peace and interna- 
tional arbitration was a marvellous one. 
Throughout all his success, with honors 
won that were so justly merited, he was the 
same unassuming, modest man as at first, 
with a simplicity of manner that gave an 
added charm to his personality. A most 
sympathetic and inspiring account of his 
life has been written by his friend and 
biographer, Charles Northend. Mr. 
Northend, himself a resident of New 
Britain for many years, is remembered 
by all for his kindly deeds and consistent 
worthy life. For several years the super- 
intendent of the public schools, he took a 
personal interest in the welfare of all the 
pupils, and this was not abated through 
the years that followed. Remembered 
with love by all who knew him for his 
distinctive qualities of goodness, justness 



and generosity, he sought to be ever 
helpful to every one with whom he came 
in contact. 

Another accomplished scholar who was 
an honor to New Britain was Ethan Allen 
Andrews, best known as the author of 
several Latin text books; a man of dis- 
tinguished ability, prominent in many 
educational works, it was largely through 
his influence that New Britain was favored 
with an advanced career so early in her 
school system. 

Among the men of more modern times 
who will go down to posterity in written 
and oral history, rone will be remembered 
with greater admiration for a just and up- 
right character, none will stand higher in 
the esteem of those who knew him, than 
Valentine B. Chamberlain. Serving his 
fellow man well, whether following the 
duties of his every day life or occupying 
offices in state or municipality, he was a 
rare man, sincere and honest in his con- 
victions, living up to high ideals, always 




VAI.KXTINIC n. CIIAMHKKLAIN. 



142 



NEW BRITAIN. 



willing to do his share in any work for the 
common weal. 

The contemplation of the life of the 
past, where men and women have not 
only lived, but have lived well, furnishes 



examples worthy of emulation by the 
people of the present, that they in turn, 
cognizant of their goodly heritage, may 
be a worthy inspiration to their successors 
of the future. 




VIEW NORTHEAST FROM THE NORMAI. SCHOOI,. 



COLONEL ZEBULON BUTLER AND WYOMING VALLEY. 



BY ANNA CONYNGHAM STEVENS KRUMBHAAR. 



IT has been said that "As the biography 
of Washington is the story of the Re- 
volution so the life of Colonel Zebulon 
Butler is the History of Wyoming." This 
is indeed true and the event which stands 
forth most prominently in his varied 
career is that dreadful massacre of Wy- 
oming fitly called by Irving, '' the most 
atrocious outrage perpetrated during the 
war ! " 

Zebulon Butler was born in Lyme, Con- 
necticut, January 23d, 1731, whither his 
parents had removed from Ipswich, Mas- 
sachusetts. He was the son of John But- 
ler and Hannah Perkins, grandson of 
Lieutenant WiUiam Butler and Mary 
Ingalls, and great grandson of John But- 
ler, all of Ipswich. 

Early joining the Colonial army, he 
served throughout the old French War 
and was captain of a company in 1761 at 
the affair at Crown Point. In the inter- 
val between that war, and his joining in 
1762 the British forces at Havana, he 
married his first wife, Anne Lord, of 
Lyme, the great granddaughter of Eliza- 
beth Hyde, the first white child born in 
Norwich, Connecticut. 

In the year 1769 occurs the first men- 
tion of Wyoming in connection with him. 
To understand somewhat of the state of 
affairs and the conflicting claims of Penn- 
sylvania and Connecticut for this tract of 
land, let us review in a few words these 
facts:-the Royal Charters granted to Penn- 
sylvania and Connecticut were expressed 



in terms most vague. The western bor- 
ders of the Connecticut Colony were de- 
fined as terminating at the shores of the 
Pacific, and the grant to William Penn 
for his colony had as almost unlimited 
northern bounderies as Connecticut had 
western ones. As can be seen, this per- 
pendicular and this horizontal line, so to 
speak, crossed, and where they crossed, 
each colony claimed possession. The 
luxuriant Wyoming Valley, through which 
flows the broad Susquehanna, lay in this 
disputed territory, and the people of Con- 
necticut were the first to turn their eyes 
to the fertile spot. As early as 1753 an 
association, known as the ^Susquehanna 
Company, was formed in Hartford for the 
purpose of colonizing the district. This 
act drew Pennsylvania's attention to these 
lands, and from that time on for many 
years the dispute for possession waxed 
strong, now in words, now in deeds. This 
prolonged civil warfare is known as the 
Pennymite and Yankee Wars. 

In 1768, Butler, who had already ac- 
quired a reputation for bravery and vigi- 
lance, was chosen leader of the first 
" Forty " settlers sent by the company to 
make a permanent settlement in the Val- 
ley. When this band reached Wyoming 
on February the eighth, 1769, they found 
the Block House, erected by the mas- 
sacred settlers of 1763, in possession of 
Captain Ogden, of Pennsylvania, and 
Sheriff' Jennings of Northampton County. 
It was proposed to the Commander of 



143 



144 COLONEL ZEBULON BUTLER AND WYOMING VALLEY. 



"The Forty" that a friendly conference 
should be held to discuss the respective 
claims. This was agreed to, and a deputa- 
tion of three men was sent to the fort, but 
no sooner were they within the Block 
House, than the Sheriff arrested them in 
the name of the Commonwealth of Penn- 
sylvania, and ordered them to be taken to 
jail at Easton. Here bail was soon found 
for them, and they returned with their 
companions. But hardly had they set 
foot in the Valley when the Sheriff again 
descended on them, and again ordered 
the settlers sent to Easton jail. As be- 
fore, owing to 'friends at court,' they 
were immediately liberated and hastened 
to return to Wyoming. Thus in less than 
sixty days from their first appearance in 
the Valley, the " Forty " had thrice been 
captured and marched a distance of sixty 
miles to jail, traveling on their way thither 
and back somewhat over two hundred 
and forty miles, through dense forests and 
over trackless mountains. 

Many times during the following years 
the little Fort changed hands, and not 
without shedding of blood and loss of 
life. The tenacity of the New Englanders 
was great ; though the odds were against 
them, houses were built in the Valley and 
farms cultivated. In 1771 the chances of 
war found the Pennymites in possession 
of the Valley, their position greatly 
strengthened by the erection of a new 
Block House, Fort Wyoming, which was 
fully garrisoned, with Captain Ogden, 
noted for bravery and boldness, in com- 
mand. But the intrepid spirits of the 
New Englanders were nothing daunted. 
Wyoming had spun her magic web about 
these men of Connecticut, and win the 
Valley for themselves they would. Butler 
who had previously suffered imprisonment 
at Ogden's hands entered Wyoming in 
March of that year with one hundred and 
fifty armed men in his command and laid 
vigorous siege to Fort Wyoming. 



The investment was of the closest. 
Butler brought to bear on the siege his skill 
and courage as a commander and his previ- 
ously gained military knowledge. Soon 
the garrison of nearly an hundred people 
began to feel the pangs of hunger. So 
sudden and secret had been Captain But- 
ler's descent that no messenger had been 
able to leave the Fort to summon aid 
from the Pennsylvania government. As 
this was their only hope, Ogden conceived 
the bold plan of himself carrying the news 
of the siege to Philadelphia. Fort Wyom- 
ing was built on the high eastern bank 
of the river, and by that river Ogden de- 
termined to elude the watchful enemy. 
Making a bundle of his clothes on which 
he prominently placed his hat, he let him- 
self down to the river and began his dan- 
gerous swim, the bundle, attached by a 
cord to his arm, floating some yards be- 
hind him. Ogden swam very low, but his 
clothes and hat were in full sight and 
instantly drew the attention of Butler's 
sentinels. They fired ; again they fired, 
the dark object floated on. Bullet after 
bullet pursued it without effect until the 
puzzling form passed out of sight. Then 
Ogden landed and dressing in his shot- 
riddled clothes, started on his hasty way 
to Philadelphia. His tidings were re- 
ceived with consternation and the troops 
he asked for were immediately granted. 
Three companies were to be sent to the 
aid of the beleagured Fort. Captain Og- 
den set out with the first company. Dur- 
ing this time Butler had discovered 
Ogden's scheme and was aware of his 
movements. Scouts were posted to an- 
nounce the arrival of the relief parties 
and on July 20th, when the troops came 
into the Valley and approached the Fort 
which they were to relieve, seemingly 
without opposition, they found themselves 
in the midst of an ambuscade. Captains 
Ogden and Dick with some of the men 
escaped to the Fort, but sixteen of the 



COLONEL ZEBULON BUTLER AND WYOMING VALLEY. 145 



soldiers, and all of the pack horses and 
stock of provisions fell into Butler's 
hands. 

A month longer the siege continued 
until the garrison, having long been on 
short allowance of food and having given 
up all hopes of re-enforcements, decided 
to surrender on August 14, 1771. 

The articles of capitulation insisted on 
the complete withdrawal of all Pennsyl- 
vania claimants from the Valley. 

The victory for Connecticut was so 
complete that the Pennsylvania forces on 
their way to Wyoming were recalled, and 
the Valley left in undisturbed possession 
of the brave men who had fought so 
stubbornly for its ownership. Captain 
Butler was hailed as the savior of Wyom- 
ing and his name and character '' in- 
spired such confidence that multitudes 
flocked thither under protection of his 
standard." 

Four years of peace followed, during 
which time the Valley flourished, settle- 
ments increased, schools were founded, 
forts, meeting-houses and mills were built 
and the present City of Wilkes-Barre laid 
out. Zebulon Butler was foremost in all 
these movements. 

In January 1774 the General Assembly 
of Connecticut passed '' An act erecting 
all the territory within her charter limits, 
from the Delaware River to a line fitteen 
miles west of the Susquehanna, a district of 
about seventy miles square, into a town to 
be called Westmoreland, attached to the 
County of Litchfield." Zebulon Butler 
was chosen Town Treasurer, and Nathan 
Denison and Zebulon Butler were com- 
niissioned Justices of the Peace. Butler 
was a universal favorite ; being quick in 
perception, vehement and rapid in ex-^cu- 
tion, he was sent as one of the two mem- 
bers from Westmoreland to the Connecti- 
cut General Assembly, in which body he 
sat until October 1776. The several 



militia companies were formed into the 
24th Regiment of Connecticut Militia, 
with Butler as Colonel. In 1775, when 
the war clouds were gathering thick and 
fast over the thirteen colonies, at a town 
meeting held in Wilkes-Barre, the men of 
Wyoming with true patriotic feelirg 
adopted a resolution to " make any ac- 
commodations with the Pennsylvania 
party that shall conduce to the best good 
of the whole, not infringing on the pro- 
perty of any person, and come in common 
cause of liberty in the defence of Amer- 
ica." 

These overtures of peace were declined 
and in November 1775 the startling news 
received that a Colonel Plunket with an 
army of seven hundred Pennsylvania men 
WIS marching to 'rescue Wyoming,' as he 
expressed it, from the Yankees. The seve- 
ral militia companies were assembled at 
Wilkes-Barre and Colonel Butler took the 
command. On the 23rd of December 
the two little armies met near the south 
western end of the \'alley (Nanticoke). 
A stubborn engagement took place and 
victory remained with the Yankees in 
s])ite of the superior numbers of the 
enemy and their elation from previous 
success. One of the soldiers, in speaking 
of Colonel Butler on the day of this battle, 
says : — I loved the man, he was an honor 
to the human species." 

On Christmas day Plunket withdrew 
his troops and foT a while there were no 
more invasions of Pennymites. Men's 
thoughts were occupied elsewhere, for the 
great war of Independence was going on, 
and the Wyoming colonists were in dan- 
ger from the Indians, should these join 
the British, for Wyoming was exposed to 
all their fury. In less than twenty-tour 
hours, from his rendezvous at Tioga by 
means of the river, the savage red man 
could enter the Valley. Butler, in a let- 
ter to Roi];er Sherman, dated August 6th. 



146 COLONEL ZEBULON BUTLER AND WYOMLNG VALLEY. 



1776, says : — "You will see by the repre- 
sentations from this town that we are un- 
der apprehension of danger from the 
Indians, as our army has retreated to 
Crown Point, and every artifice is used to 
set the Indians on us by Sir John Johnson 
and John Butler at Niagara. 

While applying to others for help 
against a foe so rightly dreaded, the 
Colonists took means to secure their own 
safety by erecting suitable block houses. 
Congress answered their demand for aid 
by ordering that "two companies on the 
Continental Establishment should be 
raised in the town of Westmoreland and 
stationed in proper places for the defence 
of the inhabitants of said town and parts 
adjacent." This was in August 1776. In 
December, when Washington had crossed 
the Delaware after his brilliant retreat 
through New Jersey, and Congress was 
fleeing from Philadelphia, it was decreed 
that the two companies raised in the town 
of Westmoreland be ordered to join Gen- 
eral Washington with all possible expedi- 
tion. The order v/as promptly obeyed. 
The protection of homes and families was 
put aside for the higher duty to their 
country, and thus the Valley was left with- 
out suitable defenders, a prey to the 
savages. In 1777 Zebulon Butler was 
comissioned Lieutenant Colonel of the 
3rd Connecticut line. This regiment 
formed part of Parsons' First Brigade, 
stationed at Peekskill under General Put- 
nam for the defence of the Hudson, and 
took part in the affairs at Danbury, Con- 
necticut, and Forts Clinton and Mont- 
gomery. In January 1778 the regiment 
took post at West Point and began the 
fortifying of that important position. 

This arduous work occupied the time 
until June, when, Howe having evacuated 
Philadelphia, Washington took up his 
march after him through New Jersey and 
General Gates sent to his aid as many 



men as he could spare from the High- 
lands. Colonel Butler was among the 
number and had the privilege of fighting 
in the battle of Monmouth. Immediately 
after the battle he applied for leave of 
absence to return to Wyoming, reports 
of a threatened invasion by the Indians 
being rife. 

As early as March Congress had be- 
come aware of the plans of the combined 
Indians and Tories to wipe out the West- 
moreland settlements and then make their 
way through, sixty miles of uninhabited 
forests to the German towns on the Le- 
high and Delaware. The Valley was in 
need of defense, but Congress refused to 
allow the two Westmoreland companies 
to return for that purpose and instead 
gave orders that another company of in- 
fantry should be raised in the town for its 
defence of which Dethick Hewett was ap- 
pointed Captain. This was practically a 
faice, for who remained to be enlisted? 
The strong men of the Valley were with 
the Continental Army, only youths and 
old men were left — what were they against 
Indians and the trained forces of the 
British? In May two Indians, former res- 
idents of Wyoming, appeared in Wilkes- 
Barre, professing friendship, but the 
people, suspecting they were spies, 
promptly plied them with drinks under 
effects of which the truth came out ; the 
attack was at once to be made ; they had 
been sent to report how things stood. 
The fear and excitement of the inhabitants 
now rose to fever pitch, not one of them 
but knew by his own experience or that 
of friends the horrors of an Indian raid. 
Congress was implored for assistance, but 
still refused to allow the return to the 
Valley of the soldiers in the Continental 
Army, who were the natural protectors 
of this frontier settlement. When these 
men heard of the capture of the Indian 
spy and the obstinate refusal of Congress 



COLONEL ZEBULON BUTLER AND WYOMING VALLEY. 147 



to allow their departure, the companies 
became almost disorganized, more than 
twenty-five men and all but two of the 
commissioned officers resigned and has- 
tened to the protection of their homes and 
families. Still it was not until the 23rd of 
June, but ten days before the massacre 
that Congress gave the order — that the 
two Independent Companies of the town 
of Westmoreland be united and form one 
company, Simon Spaulding, Captain. The 
new company, however, was only ordered 
as far as Lancaster, and, when it was too 
late, to Wyoming. 

There were two deserters from the 
British army in the Valley, and these men 
helped greatly in training the militia, for 
every male, who could carry arms, no 
matter what his age or rank, was called to 
duty. The Forts were garrisoned and the 
women and children placed in them for 
safety, principally in Forty Fort, on the 
west bank of the river, it being the largest. 
Such was the condition of affairs, when 
after the severe fighting at Monmouth and 
the long ride without rest. Colonel Butler 
arrived in the Valley on July ist, and by 
common consent assumed command. 
Truly, to undergo such fatigue as he had 
gone through and was yet to experience, 
Butler deserved the name given him some 
years previously by the Indians, of " a 
great tree." 

On June 30th the enemy had entered 
the Valley. The forces under the com- 
mand of Colonel John Butler numbered 
about 400 British provincials, consisting 
of Colonel John Butler's Rangers, a de- 
tachment of Sir John Johnson's Royal 
Greens, together with six or seven hun- 
dred Indians of the six nations, led by the 
famous Seneca Chief, " Old King." Find- 
ing the defenders at Fort Jenkins at work 
in the fields they promptly killed them, 
called on the few remaining in the Fort 
to surrender, which they did, then 



marched the next day to Port Winter- 
moot, which already being in the hands 
of Tories, opened its doors to the enemy. 
Mr. Daniel IngersoU who was present and 
suspected of sympathy v/ith the Colonists 
was made prisoner and sent under escort 
to Colonel Zebulon Butler at Forty Fort 
to demand the surrender of all the forts, 
the public property, Hewett's company 
and the Valley. Such a demand was in- 
dignantly refused. 

At a Council of War, called on the 3rd 
of July, Colonel Zebulon Butler, Colonel 
Denison and Lieutenant Colonel Dor- 
rance, with certain others, were of the 
opinion that delay would favor the cause 
of the Wyoming people by allowing time 
for reinforcements, in the shape of Cap- . 
tain Spaulding's Company, to arrive. But 
this opnion was voted down and an im- 
mediate attack resolved upon " We must 
depend on God and ourselves," was their 
argument. A little after noon on the 3rd 
of July, 1778, the Americans marched 
forth to meet the enemy, in a little 
column consisting of about 350, flags fly- 
ing and drums beating. Zebulon Butler 
commanded the right wing, Colonel Deni- 
son the left. After marching four miles 
above the Fort, Butler formed his men in 
battle order and thus addressed them : — 
" Men, yonder is the enemy. The fate of 
the Hardings (at Fort Jenkins) tells us 
what we have to expect if defeated. We 
come out to fight not only for liberty, but 
for life itself, and what is dearer to pre- 
serve — our homes from conflagration; 
our women and children from the toma- 
hawk. Stand firm the first shock, and the 
Indians will give away. Every man to his 
duty." 

It was four of the clock on that sum- 
mer afternoon before the battle began. 
For half an hour the firing and advance 
of the patriots was rapid and steady, then 
the vastly superior number of the enemy 



148 COLONEL ZEBULON BUTLER AND WYOMING VALLEY. 



began to tell, and the Indians succeeded 
in outflanking Colonel Denison on the 
left. On perceiving this, the Colonel 
gave an order to fall back, which was 
mistaken for a ''retreat." All was now 
confusion and the savages were rushing in 
with blood-curdling yells. The disorder 
communicated itself along the line. Ze- 
bulon Butler seeing the men about to 
turn, rushed between the armies and with 
a reckless contempt of death, rode furi- 
ously up and down the line urging the 
troops to stand firm. "Don't leave me, 
my children, and the victory is ours," he 
cried. But alas ! it was not in his power 
to stop them. The men were retreating. 
The overwhelming numbers of the enemy 
and the Indians were in hot pursuit. The 
confused retreat now became a bloody 
massacre. Every one who came within 
range of an Indian Tomahawk was 
scalped, murdered and mutilated. Of 
those who escaped toward Monockasy 
Island, many were killed while swimming 
across. The Indians and Tories pursued 
thither. Some of the men were per- 
suaded to return to the main shore by 
promise of quarter, but as soon as they 
landed were foully butchered. Both In- 
dians and Tories were especially savage 
towards officers and men of the Conti- 
nental Line, capturing them they would 
break the th'igh bone which prevented 
escape but left them alive for torture. 

In one place an Indian squaw called 
Queen Esther, mad with blood and fury, 
caused eighteen or nineteen prisoners to 
be ranged in a circle around her and passed 
from one to the other crooning some In- 
dian song, dashing out their brains. But 
why should 1 tell of all this horror? Suf- 
fice it that every species of torture was 
practiced on the patriots. Every captain 
who had led a company into action was 
killed. Colonel Dorrance and Major 
Garrett were slain and about i6o others. 



Fathers and sons fell side by side ; brother 
by brother. It is heartrending to read 
that of some families all of the men were . 
killed and there was hardly an household 
but lost two or more members. 

Night alone stopped the slaughter and 
pursuit, but alas, not the torture of pris- 
oners. Colonel John Butler is reported 
to have said as the odor of burning flesh 
was carried to him on the night air: — 
" It is not in my power to help it." 

In the meantime picture to yourselves 
the agony of suspense endured by those 
left in the forts as they heard the firing of 
the battle, steady at first then slower, 
coming nearer ; the war cry of the In- 
dians ; and the horrible truth known only 
when at night a' rare fugitive reached the 
Block House. Among these was Colonel 
Denison. After in vain essaying to rally 
his men for a final stand Colonel Butler 
by swimming the river, had escaped to 
Wilkes-Barre Fort. Here, heart sick and 
completely exhausted, not having had a 
moment's rest since that hot day at Mon- 
mouth, he threw himself on the ground. 
But rest was not for him. In spite of 
his efl'orts, panic seized those gathered in 
Wilkes-Barre Fort, and the adjacent block 
houses, and all the long night bands of 
women and children with a man here and 
there among them, fled from the Valley 
where lay the mangled bodies of those 
nearest and dearest to them. For many 
days up steep mountains, through wild 
forests lay their dangerous and toilsome 
way to friendly shelter. 

Zebulon Butler stayed at Wilkes-Barre 
to command those who remained, of 
whom were fourteen men of Hewett's 
company. Early the next morning, the 
4th of July, the British Colonel, Butler, 
sent a messenger to Forty Fort asking 
Colonel Denison to repair to his head- 
quarters to decide on the terms of capit- 
ulation. One of the terms insisted on 



COLONEL ZEBULON BUTLER AND WYOMING VALLEY. 149 



by John Butler was that " Colonel Zebu- 
Ion Butler and the men of Hewett's com- 
mand, being Continental soldiers, should 
be given up as prisoners of war." To this 
Colonel Denison would not agree without 
first consulting his colleagues. He re- 
turned to Forty Fort and secretly crossed 
the river to Butler at Wilkes-Barre, told 
him of the British colonel's demand and 
advised him and the Continental soldiers 
to withdraw as rapidly as possible from 
the Valley. Colonel Butler, seeing the 
wisdom of this and that it left Colonel 
Denison at Hberty to make better terms 
with the enemy, ordered the men to 
Shamokin. His own horse was saddled 
and brought to him, he mounted, placing 
^[rs. Butler and his infant son behind and 
so rode over the mountains. 

Returning to Forty Fort, Denison sent 
word to Colonel Butler that there were no 
Continental soldiers in the Valley. The 
articles of surrender were then agreed 
on, honorable alike to the two command- 
ers, and it is only due to the British offi- 
cer to mention that after the capitulation 
until Colonel Butler and his army left 
Wyoming, but one life was taken, that of 
the deserter Boyd. He withdrew his 
troops and as m.any of the Indians as he 
could control, very hurriedly on the 8th, 
without having even crossed to Wilkes- 
Barre or visited the lower part of the 
Valley. 

With the British officer, John Butler, 
away, all restraint over the Indians who 
had staid behind, was gone. Property 
was destroyed and stolen, houses and 
barns burnt, and men and women mur- 
dered. Colonel Denison and the few left 
in Forty Fort decided it best to leave, 
and fled, some down the river and some 
across the mountains. 

The Valley was a burning plain, deso- 
late in ruins. 



On reaching the first settlement on the 
Lehigh, Zebulon Butler despatched a let- 
ter to General Washington apprising him 
how matters stood and giving his report 
of the Wyoming battle and massacre. He 
suggests '' that a sufficient guard may be 
sent for the defence of the place so that 
the inhabitants may return to harvest 
their grain and restore their shattered 
homes." 

Washington complied with this request 
and ordered Butler to return to Wyoming 
and garrison Fort Wilkes- Barre with 
Spaulding's Company and the remains of 
Hewett's command and Colonel Hartley 
of the Pennsylvania Line was Sent to reir- 
force him. Early in August, Butler and his 
command came to the Valley, strength- 
ened the stockade at Wilkes- Barre, and 
gladly welcomed a few of the inhabitants 
who ventured to return. Effective meas- 
ures were at once put forth to stop the 
Indian outrages and a pitched battle was 
fought in September when the Americans, 
under Colonel Hartley were victorious. 

In September 1778 Lieutenant Colonel 
Zebulon Butler was appointed Colonel 
of the 2nd Connecticut Line. Colonel 
Thomas Grosvenor in an old letter says : — 
'' Zebulon Butler was appointed full Colo- 
nel to the late Charles Webb's regiment 
against the will of Lieutenant CoK^ntl 
Shermm (brother of Roger Sherman), 
who intended to have had the regiment." 
This promotion was probably a reward 
for his gallant conduct at Wyoming. 

Notwithstanding his new regiment, But- 
ler remained in command of the post at 
Wyoming. All that autumn and winter 
bands of Indians came into the Valley, 
murdering and plundering, and stealing 
cattle and horses. 

On the 23rd of December, 250 savages 
and Tories attacked Wilkes-Barre Fort. 
Colonel Hartley and most of his men had 
been withdrawn, leaving Butler scaice an 



ISO COLONEL ZEBULON BUTLER AND WYOMING VALLEY, 



hundred with which to repulse the enemy. 
They were driven back, however, but the 
smoke of burning houses and barns 
marked their retreating path. 

This attack amounted almost to a sec- 
ond invasion of the Valley, and when the 
news was communicated by Butler to the 
Board of War, one of the members said 
hastily in presence of the messenger : — 
^- It is impossible, it can't be so ! " This 
remark being repeated to him Colonel 
Butler immediately sent an answer, to- 
wit : — : " That no officer who properly re- 
garded his own honor would without the 
slightest evidence, call in question the 
honor of a brother soldier." 

The spring of 1779 was spent in col- 
lecting information for General Washing- 
ton who proposed sending the following 
summer a large army to lay waste the 
Indian country and drive the savages 
back to Niagara. This army, under the 
command of Major General Sullivan, was 
to rendezvous at Wyoming, and march 
thence northward. By the end of July 
1779, 3,500 men were encamped in the 
Valley ready to march. Colonel Zebulon 
Butler was to stay at Wyoming, sufficient 
men being left with him for the protec- 
tion of the country. 

On the ist of August the army started 
forward. Passing Monackasy Island, 
which was a part of the battlefield, the 
fifes and drums played a dirge and the 
columns halted for a moment in honor of 
the patriot dead. 

Although Sullivan's victories were hailed 
everywhere as having put an end to the 
Indian depredations and cruelties, it was 
a mistaken idea. During the following 
three years, i78o-'8i-'82, the Indians 
were constantly in the Wyoming Valley, 
committing atrocious deeds of violence. 

Colonel Butler remained in command 
as possessing most skill in Indian warfare, 
leaving his regiment under the orders of 



Lieutenant Isaac Sherman. An old book 
tells that : — '' Butler made a flying visit 
to his regiment to see that proper disci- 
pline and order were preserved, then hast- 
ening back to Wyoming to a station of 
excessive care and responsibihty, yet af- 
fording no chance to gather laurels, 
he performed most arduous duties in a 
manner to entitle him to the gratitude 
and praises of his country." 

The old jealousy between Pennsylvania 
and Connecticut had by no means died 
out. In the spring of 1 781 Pennsylvania, 
confident of the final success of the war, 
owing to the assured help of France, be- 
gan to take measures for the possession 
of Westmoreland when the national con- 
flict should be ended. The first move 
was to have the Connecticut troops gar- 
risoning the township replaced by those 
of the State. Accordingly Colonel Butler 
was relieved of the command, and joining 
his regiment served to the end of the 
war with the honor and bravery usual to 
the soldiers of his native State, of whom 
Washington is reported to have said : — 
"That if all the States had done their 
duty as well as the little State of Con- 
necticut the war would have been ended 
long ago." 

After the surrender of Cornwallis, Ze- 
bulon Butler was appointed Colonel 4th 
Regiment Connecticut Line in the new 
formation for the years 1781 to 1783, 
and Colonel of the ist Regiment Con- 
necticut Line, formation of January to 
June 1788. During this time he was sta- 
tioned at West Point. 

When in May 1783 at the quarters 
near Fishkill of his warm friend the 
Baron Steuben, the Society of the Cin- 
cinnati was organized. Colonel Zebulon 
Butler's name was second on the Con- 
necticut list. 

He now married his third wife, Phebe 
Haight, sister of Captain Haight, of 



COLONEL ZEBULON BUTLER AND WYOMING VALLEY. 15 



Peekskill. Returning with his bride to 
Wyoming, in the summer of 1783, he 
found the Valley in a high state of excite- 
ment, owing to the outrages practised 
against the Connecticut Colonists by 
Alexander Patterson, the magistrate ap- 
pointed by Pennsylvania to Westmore- 
land. Connecticut and Pennsylvania had 
met in 1782 to settle their territorial 
disputes before a Court of Commissioners 
who had decided in favor of Pennsylvania. 
This decision was received quietly by the 
people and Westmoreland passed into the 
jurisdiction of another State. All would 
have gone well had not Pennsylvania, in 
an high-handed and unprecedented man- 
ner, decided to evict from their estates all 
those holding lands under Connecticut 
claims, and give them to Pennsylvania 
landholders, and sent to Wilkes-Barre for 
this purpose a Civil Magistrate, Patterson 
and two companies of soldiers. Patter- 
son had been with Ogden in the former 
Pennymite wars, and was especially ran- 
corous against Colonel Butler, having 
been one of those whom this officer 
starved into surrender in 1770. Conse- 
quently, when Butler arrived at Wilkes- 
Barre, Patterson and his Pennsylvania 
soldiery seized him, and heaping indigni- 
ties on him hurried him off to jail at Sun- 
bury. Bail was at once given for the 
"gallant veteran" and he returned to his 
family, only, however, to suffer fresh in- 
sults from Patterson and to see his fellow 
colonists and friends unjustly and in the 
most gross manner treated by this man, 
who claimed to be acting in the name of 
Pennsylvania. He was a brute, whose 
magistracy in Westmoreland reads like 
that of Judge Jeffrey's and his inhuman 
assizes. 

Not until September 15th, 1784, when 
after the loss of many lives and with pub- 
lic opinion urging them to the act, the 
Pennsylvania Assembly ordered the sett- 



ler's possessions restored to them, did 
peace dawn. 

In September 1786, the western half of 
the town of Westmoreland was erected 
into the County of Luzerne, named after 
the Chevalier de la Luzerne, he who car- 
ried to France the news of Cornwallis's 
surrender; Colonel Timothy Pickering 
was sent to Wilkes-Barre to organize the 
new county. An election was ordered to 
choose the necessary administrative offi- 
cers. Hut there was bad feeling still 
among the people against Pennsylvania, 
so often had she broken her pledge to 
them ; and why should they now believe 
her assurances more than formerly? The 
two parties were bitter against each other 
and words had come to blows, when Col- 
onel Butler, mounted on his war- charger, 
rode into the crowd (with drawn sword) 
exclaiming : — "I draw my sword in de- 
fence of the law, let every lover of peace 
support me." Thus by his intervention 
was the election allowed to proceed. 

So prudently and justly had he sup- 
ported the rights of the settlers in the 
disputes after the Revolution, believing 
confidently that Pennsylvania would settle 
all things equitably, and such the esteem 
in which he was held, that he received 
the appointment of Lieutenant of Luzerne 
County, which position he held until 1790 
when the office was abolished. 

His eventful life, which had been 
one of absolute and fearless devotion to 
his country and to what he considered 
right, was now drawing to a close. It was 
in his home at Wilkes-Barre on July 2Sih, 
1 795, that he died, mourned by the people 
for whom his sword and his influence had 
won the rich Valley in which they lived 
at last, unmolested. Here is a little inci- 
dent of his later years which will leave in 
our minds a peaceful impression to con- 
trast with the horrors of war of which we 
have heard so much: — a sjentlewoman. 



152 



CAROL. 



on first coming to Wilkes-Barre, saw a 
man step from a door into the street and 
meet a friend. With a slight bow the 
gentleman, stopping, placed his silver- 
headed cane under his left arm, took out 
his snuff box. rapped the lid (as he took 
it off) and offered it to his friend, then 
took a pmch himself and brushing his 



face slightly with his doubled bandanna 
bowed and passed on. The whole in 
such manner as to induce her instantly 
(and eagerly) to inquire, "What gentle- 
man is that?" The answer was, "La! 
don't you know? that's Colonel Butler, I 
thought everybody knew him." 



CAROL. 



Now each reviving herb that lay 
So still 'neath mould, 'neath snow 

Pricks up to meet the Easter Day 
From out its grave below. 

And now the rising south-wind sighs 
Among the budding trees, 

The sun the tulip's chalice spies, 
And drains it to the lees. 

" Away," enjoins the water-brooks, 

"Up. up !" the robins sing, 

" The burly tree is full of sap. 

And all the world a- wing." 

The hare beneath the brier-bough. 
Aye, every creeping thing. 

Beholds with new and thankful heart 
The winter yield to spring. 



And man upon his blossoming isle 

Makes glad with high accord, 
And triumphs over death anew 

Through his triumphant Lord. 

Elizabeth Alden Curtis. 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



BY CHAUNCEY C. HOTCHKISS. 



CHAPTER IV. 



Mr. Talbot Marcy. 



The advent of a total stranger occa- 
sioned something of a shock among the 
committee. His face and figure, so strik- 
ingly like the rector's, would have been 
enough to stir them ; but coming on top 
of the surprising explosion of Cyrus Bent 
it created a sensation and a situation 
highly theatrical. The sturdy townsmen, 
variously swayed by their emotions, stood 
for a moment openly wondering at what 
to them was in the nature of an appari- 
tion, while the crowd without pushed and 
struggled for a coign of vantage at the 
door and window. But ere one of the 
inquisitors could gather his wits to cope 
with the new situation, the stranger had 
wheeled about and confronted the group, 
his eyes ablaze, and with a voice like a 
trumpet, he vociferated : 

'* Persecution ! Thunder and devils ! 
In what manner and by what right do ye 
persecute a damsel? Are ye the worship- 
ful committee of whom I heard last 
night? and, failing to find my brother, do 
ye think to vent your disappointment on 
her helpless head? Expound in the name 
o' God ! — my patience is none of the 
fairest !" 

" Your patience has little to do with us 
or our duty !" broke in one of the lesser 
lights, at which there came a shout from 



the yard : — '-Tar the tory 1" and " Pitch 
him out to us ! — Jail him !" and a variety 
of other cries which were suddenly 
silenced by Squire Strong striding to the 
door and closing it in the faces of the 
throng without ; then coming to the 
front and with a voice trembling from 
anger, he shouted in turn : — 

" Who be ye that dare to come be- 
twixt us an' our actions? By the brand 
on ye we have yet another to deal with ! 
A fig for yer inteiference ! We be detar- 
mined to catch the domine an' 'twill be 
strange if ye be not shaken up in the 
same basket ! This young woman knows 
the whereabouts of her god-fatht-r an' 
refuses to reveal him ; therefore we com- 
mit her for trail as a person dangerous to 
the interests of the colonies. I tell ye we 
have our duty to perform, an' performed 
it will be ! An' ye openly call yerselt his 
brother? — Ve look the breed ! By what 
right do ye break upon us in this 
manner?" 

'' He struck me last night when I called 
on Toby to help arrest him \ He bears 
papers from England to the domine ; — he 
confesses as much I" broke in Bent who 
had recovered himself and now stood 
pointing at the man upon whom all eyes 
were fixed. 



153 



154 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



" He does ? An' why have ye kept 
this back from us?" demanded the chair- 
man without softening voice or face ; 
but before an answer could be given 
the new comer spoke : — 

'^You are a lot of sheep with wolfish 
instincts !" he began, with a total change 
in his address. " Strike him ! Aye, I 
struck him for the insult he gave me. 
He is naught but the whistling wind — he 
is of no moment — his actions of no 
weight! Listen! you sirs; I lack no 
respect for your office, but I question your 
right to hound a harmless gentleman 
whose sole faults are praying for the king 
and eluding you — the latter, I fear, 
troubling you more than the offense. Ye 
be good. God-fearing men, doubtless, 
and will not question the christian spirit 
of my brother ; why, then, does he do 
harm in praying for the king? Are ye 
not taught, and do ye not teach others 
the lesson of love to enemies? Can 
prayers for your enemies make them 
powerful against the right? Is your 
church for the Sabbath, alone, that ye 
play with the devil and his passions for 
the rest of the week? Shame on ye !" 

The presentation of this mixture of 
applied Christianity and sophistry took 
the committee somewhat aback. Even 
the face of the squire lost its angry cast 
and bore one of doubt. But it was not 
for long. With a natural instinct towards 
self-justification, he answered : — 

''We have the authority of the high 
court at Hartford, and though your 
words, sir, be fine—" 

"Authority for what?" interrupted the 
stranger. 

"Authority to suppress treason in every 
shape an' arrest all treasonable persons !" 

" And since when has it been treason 
to pray to the Almighty — even for the 
king?" came the sharp retort. " — You 
forget yourselves, sirs. Your authority 
refers only to what the court would call 



overt acts, assistance to the enemies of the 
colonies or the giving of information to 
be used against them — and prayers are 
not interdicted, nor is private opinion. 
Nay, more; — George of England is yet 
your king ! I know of no act which has 
cut the colonies from the mother coun- 
try ; — nor do ye. Has war been declared ? 
It is true that congress is preparing an 
army for the struggle that must come, 
but your dignity would suffer less were 
you less ready to use your strength on an 
innocent man and a helpless maiden ." 

"Sir; 7vho be ye — and from wkere do 
ye hail?'' demanded the chairman, 
visibly impressed both by the authorita- 
tive manner of the speaker and the un- 
doubted truth of his statement regarding 
the relations betwixt colonies and king, 
but without abating his tenacity of pur- 
pose in the slightest degree. " — Would 
ye argue that we he still till there be a 
British dragoon in each house — and then 
follow our instructions? We expect as 
much from ye — by yer looks ; but we 
happen not to be here to split words with 
a stranger — an enemy to liberty whose 
strength lies in a smooth tongue ! We 
follow our commission — an' 'tis our in- 
tention to search this house. Failing to 
find the rector, we will hold the damsel 
for trial at Hartford." 

"Ye will?" 

" We will?'' 

" Well — your force is somewhat too 
much for my single arm, but at Hartford 
I shall be ! Will ye not take me as a 
prisoner, also?— Am I not as dangerous 
as the maiden?" 

" That we will, too! " vociferated the 
old man, walking up and thrusting his 
face into his opponent's ; " — Who be ye, 
I say ; — who dare bait this committee in 
this unseemly fashion?" 

Instead of the wrathful explosion which 
might well have been expected, the 
stranger smiled broadly : 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



155 



"Tis but fair to put you in the light ;" 
was the ready answer given in an easy, 
good natured tone ; ^* — I am Talbot 
Marcy; — late colonial commissioner to 
England ; — half brother to the man ye 
are hounding, and colonel, by commis- 
sion, in the colonial forces now being 
raised by congress. A week agone I 
left Boston as a despatch bearer with a 
despatch to Governor Trumtull from 
Doctor Warren. From your governor I 
bore a packet to Deacon Walker of this 
town. On my way I overtook the post 
and bore hither his despatches for him ; — 
his horse having given out. Gentlemen ; 
— I am at your disposal for further in- 
quiries." 

Had a platoon of British regulars made 
their appearance and placed the inmates 
of the house under arrest, the consterna- 
tion could not have been greater than at 
the words of the stranger. There was 
not a man but who had heard of Com- 
missioner Marcy ; — only one who doubted 
the truth of the statement, and not one 
who was willing to openly recede from 
the position taken by the chairman, who, 
on the foregoing announcement, had 
stepped back as though in fear of assault. 

There was no spirit of subserviency in 
the breasts of our fore-fathers. Had the 
man before them suddenly discovered 
himself as George the Third, in person, 
there would have been no precipitate 
apologies or servile bending of the knee. 
The names of Warren and Trumbull had 
fully as much potency, but the hard- 
headed, hard-fisted sons of New England 
were as loath to abandon a theory as to 
run from its consequences. 

This mixture of respect and stub- 
borness had the effect of silencing all 
parties for the moment. All save Bent, 
who hung on vengeance against the man 
who had struck him, and whose brain 
(subtle enough at times) , clearly foresaw 
II 



that by the turn of affairs he was likely 
to be made the scapegoat of the day. 
No one would lift voice or hand to pro- 
tect him, but he conceived how he could 
protect himself. He saw it all clearly 
enough now. That the minister was 
within the house at that moment, he no- 
wise doubted. He had no well defined 
plan of action until the new comer 
seemed to open a way. He would clear 
himself by finding the Reverend Challiss, 
and according to the words of Talbot 
Marcy, if indeed it was he, the court 
would acquit the minister. It would at 
once determine his political position to 
the satisfaction of the committee, nor 
would it be a difficult matter to afterward 
explain the act to Hetty that all might 
appear consistent with his love for her, 
and then — 

But he went no further into possibil- 
ities. Raising his voice as though he had 
been the victim of an outrage, he 
cried : — 

" I protest ! — I protest to one and all ! 
Let not that man cajole you into leaving 
the house unsearched. You brought me 
here that I might be cleared or con- 
demned and if you depart without taking 
action, I demand an acquittal. I tell you 
the domine was here last night— and 
is here now and afid I can find him. 
Mistress Hetty Wain has neither heart 
nor hand in his coming or going, and, 
moreover, it would be a foul thing to do 
if you visit the shortcomings of her god- 
father on her head ! The man before 
you has papers on him ! ^^'ho knows 
him to be Commissioner Marcy? Are 
you to be blinded by a bald statement? " 

He stood forth, his hands stretched 
out in appeal, and, his words ringing 
through the silence, variously eftected 
his hearers. Hetty, whom from the time 
she sank into her chair had kept her face 
buried in her hand raised her head and 



156 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



said : — " I thank you, Master Bent, for 
your defense, but your statement is 
hardly true. I know, or think I know 
the whereabouts of the rector : — never- 
theless, I thank you." 

The voice was kindly and the clerk's 
heart responded to the first words that 
might be construed as considerate he had 
received that day ; Marcy scowled as he 
listened to the protest and rejoinder, 
while the chairman seized upon the open- 
ing offered. 

"There is justice in the lad's words;" 
he ventured. " 'Tis but fair ye prove 
yerself, and having done so, ye are bound 
to help us, for not only has the domine 
prayed for the king — which may or may 
not be an offense — but, by the Lord ! I 
had well-nigh forgotten to tell ye that from 
the pulpit he has the same as openly 
damned the colonies, which, I take it, 
cannot be smoothed over ! " 

" Is it so?" said Marcy, with the same 
easy humor he had assumed; " — Then 
has the study of theology addled my 
brother's judgment ! Mistress Hetty, 
have you the smallest objection to their 
searching the house? " 

'' Not the smallest ;" replied the girl, 
looking away from him. 

'^Then off with ye on a fools errand !" 
cried Marcy, turning to the committee ; 
" — As for this lady — ye may leave her 
under my guarantee." 

*^ And of what value is your guarantee," 
asked Bent, encouraged both by the way 
his words had been received by the girl, 
and his apparent victory ; " — and by 
what right do you thus take charge of 
her?" 

^' Aye ! aye ! The lad is pointed, 
though somewhat heady !" broke in the 
squire. " Have ye aught to prove yer- 
self? " 

'' Little enough, I fear me ! " answered 
Marcy ; "■ — and for that, I will take all 



consequences. As for my avouching for 
Mistress Wain — 'tis but fair that she be 
allowed to speak for herself in the matter. 
Hetty, Is the right mine?" His words 
were like a caress. 

For an answer the blood leaped to the 
girl's face and throat and as quickly 
receded leaving her pale again. Her 
large eyes grew larger as she looked at 
the man before her as though to read his 
soul — then, without a word, she bowed 
her head and left the room from which 
was heard her steps as she hurried up the 
stairs. 

" I am not denied, at least," he re- 
marked quietly, though with a new 
expression to his countenance as his 
glance followed her ; " as for ' myself, 
perhaps these will show; they are but 
letters from Doctor Warren whilst I was 
in London, and papers relating to the 
death of my mother wherein we are told 
of our inheritance. This latter was my 
business with my brother." 

Bent's spirits sank dangerously low. 
With the keen eye of a lover he had 
noticed the light in Marcy's face as well 
as Hetty's agitation as she tacitly 
acknowledged his right to protect her; 
but of the nature of that right the clerk 
had no idea. It was enough for him to 
mark the stranger's evident power over 
the girl, and more than enough to see 
the ease with which he was clearing him- 
self from suspicion. The hatred the 
youth bore the minister was being rapidly 
transferred to the brother, and in doing 
this he was very human. The fact that 
but little notice had been taken of his 
duplicity the night before was small com- 
fort to him. It gave him no sense of 
safety for the future, and in fact he 
thought but little of it so thoroughly was 
he aroused by the perception of an un- 
known relation between his love and this, 
to him, total stranger. He was swayed 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



57 



by'an internal passion, of which nothing 
was discernible in his bearing, and as 
through a fog he saw the papers offered 
by Marcy pass from hand to hand, and 
heard without heeding, the questions and 
answers given and received. A clutch 
seemed to grip his throat and hold him 
speechless. The sunlight on the floor 
turned to a blood red patch before his 
eyes, and he felt an insane desire to fly at 
his smiling enemy, who did not even 
deign to notice him. At last he was 



brought to himself by hearing Hetty's 
name as the committee came to its con- 
clusion. It was the squire's voice that 
roused him. 

"We will leave Mistress Wain under 
your guarantee for a space, sir ; until we 
can have the sense of Deacon Walker on 
the matter. I have small doubt of yer 
credentials. Come, Master Bent, make 
good yer boast. Neighbors, the morning 
somewhat wags; let us get through the 
house. 



CHAPTER V. 



The Secret of the House. 



Bent drew himself up with the air of a 
man aroused from sleep who suddenly 
realizes he has a serious duty to perform, 
and there was an ominous setting of his 
teeth as he followed the throng from the 
kitchen to the parlor. From here, with- 
out the slightest system, the hunt began, 
each man taking his own direction and 
searching after his own fashion. In half 
an hour the house had been gone through 
from cellar to attic. Not a cranny had 
been left unscrutinized. Every chest, 
press and closet that could have held a 
boy was examined. Even the empty cider 
barrels in the cellar were probed through 
their bung-holes, and this with as much 
earnestness as though it had not been 
tried the week before by the same par- 
ties. 

Every man had looked up the throat of 
the great chimney, but the arch of stone 
which covers its top prevented the light 
from penetrating from above. As a last 
resort the fire was lighted on the parlor 
hearth, and there was an air of the ridic- 
ulous in the expectant attitudes of those 



who stood about it as they watched to 
see the rector tumble from this, his last 
possible refuge, fairly smoked out. As 
the flames grew in strength so did the 
disappointment of the searchers, and 
when finally it was declared that the rec- 
tor could not be beneath the roof of the 
Glebe house, one by one the disgusted 
farmers dispersed, taking with them most 
of those who still lingered about the 
door-yard, yet leaving within, beside the 
regular inmates of the rectory, Colonel 
Talbot Marcy and Cyrus Bent. 

This latter individual had searched 
with more method than the others, possi- 
bly because he had more at stake, and 
possibly because he felt sure that the 
Reverend Challiss had been bestowed so 
securely that ordinary means would fail 
to find him. The very willingness of 
Hetty to have the house gone over proved 
that much, but it nowise abated the 
young man's certainty that the roof then 
covering him covered the domine also. 

He had seen nothing to lead him to 
suspect one locality more than another. 



158 



THE GLEBE HOUSE, 



but he had carefully sounded every floor 
and the walls of every closet, doing his 
work so slowly and thoughtfully, yet so 
hatefully withal, that by the time he was 
about to attack the attic the rest of his 
fellows had finished their tasks and 
returned to the parlor where the final act 
of burning out the chimney was in pro- 
gress. 

The attic seemed a most natural place 
for a refugee and for that reason Bent 
thought little of it. He had determined 
to go to it, however, and was about ap- 
proaching the door of the rector's bed- 
room, through which he had gone most 
carefully, when he caught sight of Hetty 
standing at the head of the front stair- 
way listening with the greatest attention 
to the sounds that came from the parlor. 
So absorbed was she that it was plain his 
presence had not been noticed, and the 
clerk, halting like a hound at point, 
watched her a moment with his soul in his 
eyes. Then and there there came to him 
the conviction that the rector was hidden 
somewhere down stairs — the rapt atten- 
tion of the girl to things below assuring 
him of this more than possibility. 

The passionate determination of the 
youth made him clear-headed in one par- 
ticular, at least. He saw that a precipi- 
tate betrayal of his suspicions would avail 
him nothing at the present time ; he saw, 
too, that the fox would finally unearth 
himself and that he might be a witness. 
Quickly stepping back he looked about 
him for means of concealment. He 
fairly reckoned that as soon as the 
searchers left the house his quarry would 
be forthcoming — and not before ; in the 
meantime he himself must disappear. At 
the end of the room and facing a desk or 
heavy center table strewn with papers and 
books stood a large clothes-press, the 
doors of which had been left ajar by 
some searcher a few moments before. To 



this he crept quietly, and crowding him- 
self behind the folds of a black Geneva 
gown, awaited events without the slight- 
est doubt as to the success of his move, 
or the smallest stroke of conscience at 
his unfairness and lack of dignity. 

Meanwhile Colonel Talbot Marcy was 
striding the kitchen floor as though a 
prisoner. The easy good nature that had 
marked his face during the latter portion 
of the conversation with the committee, 
had gone, and in its stead was a fiery im- 
patience. There being no place of pos- 
sible concealment for the rector in the 
kitchen it had soon been deserted — even 
the old man at the fire having shambled 
out into the yard, and the walker was free 
to vent his nervous tension without wit- 
nesses. Now and again he opened the 
back stairs door and essayed to go above, 
but at each attempt voices in the upper 
rooms showed the committee was yet un- 
satisfied, and he withdrew. There was no 
anger in his dark eye — only fierce desire 
held under control — a state more to be 
dreaded than the former when it meets 
with opposition and far surpassing mere 
anger in lack of reason. 

Presently the footsteps and voices of 
the searchers centered in the west room or 
parlor ; then after an apparently intermi- I 
nable time the committee began leaving ! 
by the front door. As the last one passed 
out through the brooding silence that fell 
upon the house the man in the kitchen 
heard the light footsteps of the girl as she 
ran down the front stairs. In an instant 
he had dashed through the parlor and 
came upon her as she entered the oppo- 
site door. Without a word he caught her 
in his arms and kissed her on the lips, she 
struggling to undo his grasp as she 
turned her face from him. 

"Talbot! Talbot!" she ejaculated; 
" let me go ; let me go ! By what right 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



159 




"tai^bot! taIvBot!" she ejaculated ' 

LET ME GO ! " 

" By what right !" he exclaimed, hold- 
ing her from him but not freeing her; 
" By what right? By the right of a fam- 
ishing man ! By the right I take ! By 
the right you gave me less than an hour 
agone ! Great God ! have I hungered 
and thirsted for thee for two years to be 
denied now?" 

"By the right of strength alone !" she 
returned, interrupting him as by a violent 
movement she twisted from his hold on 
her. '* Hunger — and thirst ! and have 
you thought naught of possible starvation 
for another? Am I to be denied all 
rights? Two years, Talbot!" she cried, 
pointing her finger at him ; " two years ; 
two deadly years of silence and then you 



burst upon me with a cry 
of your rights. You sud- 
denly appear like one 
from the dead and be- 
cause — and when in ter- 
ror for my liberty and 
your brother's life I 
appealed to you as I 
would to — to any last 
resort, you take this ad- 
vantage ! Oh ! but you 
are a man !" 

"Two years !" said 
Marcy, amazedly, stoop- 
ing to bring his eyes to 
the level of the flashing 
blue ones before him. 
" I wrote each month for 
a year and without a word 
1 n return ! Has my 
worthy brother converted 
you to his political 
creed? Dost love king 
so much that you , have 
none for his enemy? I 
thought so, I swear, un- 
til you placed yourself in 
my hands an hour agone, 
and left the room." 
"Ar't not ashamed, sir!" she cried. 
" What cared I for colonies or king when 
my heart was breaking ? Two years agone 
I gave you my promise. You went away 
on your mission, and from then until to- 
day I knew no more than that you were 
alive. Have I suffered nothing? and 
must I, on the instant, humble myself 
and submit to you because, forsooth, 
you so desire ? You speak of rights ; 
have /none?" 

"And who told you I was alive?" 
asked the man, in a low voice. 

" My god-father, with whom you prob- 
ably corresponded without a message to 
me ; that is, for aught I know." 

" Good God I What treason has been 



LET ME GO 



i6o 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



played between us?" ejaculated Marcy 
fiercely, as he turned and strode across 
the floor, perplexity and anger taking the 
place of the passion that had flamed in 
his face a moment before. " You know 
that my priestly brother and I were never 
lovers, — and yet, and yet, he could not 
have done this thing. I wrote him but 
once, I swear. When did you leave 
Hartford?" 

" Some eight months since." 

"Only that ?" he interrupted. 

" But that was far later than intended," 
she continued. " Talbot, you have the 
brain of your calling. You are a diplo- 
mat and would twist facts and fancies 
until — " 

" Kush, Hetty. I begin to see ! From 
the Reverend Archibald I had an answer 
bidding me shelter myself from the rising 
wrath of Britain; telling me that my 
errand abroad would but damn myself and 
those about me ; also informing me that 
you were again under his care. To this 
place, to Woodbury, I sent my letters to 
you ; not to Hartford. Have they been 
lost or forgotten and are lying pigeon- 
holed in some musty corner awaiting your 
call? Who holds the mail in this vil- 
lage?" 

"I know not!" she replied, drawing 
herself to her height and following his 
steps with her eye as he still paced the 
floor. " I know not ! Oh, Talbot ! If 
you be deceiving me — lifting me by a 
hope propped with a lie, in the name of 
God stop before you do so hideous a 
thing. If, indeed, to possess me would 
be happiness, look to yourself. I will not 
be played with — not even by you." 

'' Played with !" he vociferated, wheel- 
ing about. " Dost know my nature so 
little, then? And yet, were I lying you 
would be justified in this. I tell thee, 
Hetty, I would have thee only in the light 



of truth; otherwise would you be but 
wife in name !" 

She clasped her hands and looked at 
him, a glorious smile trembling on her 
lips, but ere she could speak Marcy con- 
tinued, '^And now where is my weak- 
spirited brother ? Is it not high time for 
his return ? This hiding without is but a 
matter of days ; he will be finally caught. 
Yet I must see him at once for there is 
little time to spare before I go." 

"Go ! When do you go?" she gasped, 
the smile vanishing. 

"What boots it when?" he replied, "so 
that—" 

"Well?" 

" So that you go with me !" He turned 
suddenly and caught her in his arms 
again, but not until he had seen her sweet 
face turn crimson, nor was her struggle 
for liberty so fierce as to command his 
respect. 

" But the letters— the letters, Talbot ! 
I may appear weak but I am — I am very 
firm !" 

" Aye, thou are adamant, my sweet ; 
but the letters — aye, the letters ; but his 
lordship first, then Hetty, trust me, I will 
find those letters or raise the town. They 
cannot all be shipwrecked, nor is there 
an embargo oq every port. Only if I 
prove the letters — " He hesitated. 

" If you prove the letters ! Well — " 

"Then may I buy a pillion for my 
horse ?" 

She turned rosy again. "We will 
abide by god-dad for that," she answered 
quickly, crossing the room. " Poor god- 
dad ! He is buried alive and I had about 
forgotten him !" She went to the closet 
and threw open the door. " Would you 
know the secret of the Glebe house, and 
will you swear never to reveal it?" she 
demanded archly. 

" I will swear to anything your majesty 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



i6i 



desires," he returned with a low bow of 
mock humiHty. 

" Then unbend your dignity and pull 
down those logs." 

He did so, leveling the pile she had 
hurriedly thrown up earlier in the day. 
" Now step to the window," she com- 
manded, "and tell me if any people are 
about." 

"Aye," he answered after an instant. 



wall of the small compartment, reprating 
the blows slowly. In a few seconds a 
slight noise was heard — a creaking as 
though from a swollen door being forced 
and then, for two feet from the floor, the 
boards at the rear of the closet suddenly 
sprung upward and outward, showing a 
hole well nigh square and large enough to 
admit a good sized man.* Hetty at once 
propped the open valve with a log, and 
the space was immediately filled by the 




MARCY LOOKKD ON IN AMAZEMENT AS THE SOILED AND COBWEHHED REFUGEE 
EMERGED INTO THE LIGHT, IN AN INSTANT IT WAS ALL CLEAR TO HIM. 



" There be three men under the butter- 
nut across the road ; hobbledehoys, 
doubtless, waiting for ploughing weather. 
They look harmless !" 

" Watchers, perhaps — and more than 
perhaps. I fear them not. The hunt is 
cold for this day at least ! Come — you 
wish to see god-dad ! Look here !" 

She picked a small fire stick from the 
floor and rapped three times on the rear 



legs and body of the rector as he backed 
from his hiding place. 

Marcy looked on in amazement as the 
soiled and cobwebbed covered refugee 
emerged into the light, but in an instant 
it was all clear to him. Then he ad- 
vanced, and clapping the blinking man on 
the shoulder, exclaimed with a laugh : "I 
arrest ye, Archibald Challiss. for high 
treason to the colonies as well as for low- 



*The minister's hiding place still exists and is shown to visitors. 



l62 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



ering the standard of the cloth. Ha ! ha ! 
My faith ! How like the coming in of 
Cahban !" 

The minister scrambled to his feet with 
the utmost alacrity, and turned on the 
speaker only to meet the smiling face and 
outstretched hand of his half brother. 

" Talbot ! Is it Talbot ? I— I thought 
you in England !" he faltered without the 
least cordiality as he took his brother's 
hand and gave it a perfunctory shake. 

" And rightly enough up to eight weeks 
ago !" 

"And — so you have arrived again in 
America?" 

" Astounding penetration ! Yes — I 
think I may say I have arrived !" rejoined 
Marcy, the good nature fading from his 
face as from head to foot he slowly con- 
templated the figure of his brother. 

"And you are quite well, we trust!" 
said the rector, shifting uneasily. 

''Are you using the 'we' plural or the 
*we' ecclesiastical? If you are inquiring 
in behalf of Hetty, she already knows of 
my state. Yes — I am quite well. I have 
nothing to complain of — physically !" 

" That is good ; that is well !" replied 
the rector, on whom the sarcasm of his 
brother's words appeared to be lost. 
''Yes — yes, Talbot, we are glad to see 
you ! Hetty, my dear, I cut but a poor 
figure and am quite famished ! Talbot, 
if you care to go up with me while I 
make myself more presentable I will be 
glad to talk with you ! Hetty, have they 
quite dispersed?" 

" There is little to fear from the com- 
mittee for the rest of this day !" broke in 
Marcy , " and I will await your return ; 
that is, I am going for my horse and we 
will enjoy each other's society somewhat 
later. You doubtless guess at the nature 
of the business between us." 

"You refer to my mother's will?" ven- 
tured the rector, interrogatively. 



" Our mother's will might be in better 
taste ; yes, that — and matters in general !" 

The rector bowed his head without 
further remark, and laying his hand on 
the latch of the hall floor, opened it and 
passed upstairs. 

"Talbot," said Hetty reproachfully, as 
the minister's steps ceased to sound, " I 
am sorry you do not love your brother. 
It is very strange ; he is, and has been, so 
good to me." 

"By my faith ! what think you of his 
greeting to me ? Cordiality in extremis. 
I know I little deserve the wealth of 
affection he has poured on my worthless 
head by being good to you. I am an in- 
grate and — good God ! what's that?" 

The exclamation was drawn from the 
man by a loud cry from the floor above, 
followed by the crash of overturned fur- 
niture which shook the house like a small 
earthquake. One look at the girl's 
blanched face was enough for Marcy, and 
without a word he turned and bounded 
up the stairs. The noise of scuffling, 
together with muffled cries, directed him 
to the rector's room and he threw open 
the door to see his brother, coatless and 
unshod, struggling to hold down the lithe 
form of Cyrus Bent, who was twisting 
with an energy that made the task a diffi- 
cult one even to his powerful adversary. 
On the floor lay the overturned center 
table, the contents of which were scat- 
tered widely about the room, its weight 
bearing witness to the violence that had 
caused its overthrow. 

As Marcy entered the minister loosened 
his hold on the prostrate man and 
straightened himself, but on the instant 
his opponent leaped to his feet and seiz- 
ing the rector by the collar, shouted as 
well as his panting would allow : 

" I have him at last !" Then indicat- 
ing Marcy with a look he continued : "If 
you be a friend of the colonies as you 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



163 



Stated but shortly ago, I call on you to 
assist me to arrest this man in the name 
of the committee !" 

" Talbot, unfasten this madman?" cried 
the rector, as he vainly tried to tear away 
the hand that had gripped him." "He 
was hiding in my clothes press and at- 
tacked me as I opened it, driving me 
against the desk in his frenzy. He is the 
clerk at Beacon's store. How he came 
here and for what purpose I know not ! 
I have done the lad no injury nor do I 
wish to do it now !" 

" Nor have I done you one, if you will 
look at it in the right light !" gasped 
Bent. " I call on you to surrender, 
sir. Your case is hopeless until you are 
acquitted, and this man, your brother, 
avouches you will be ! You see I am 
more a friend than aught else !" 

'•' Hiding — ha ! I fancy I catch the lay 
of the land !" exclaimed Marcy, as he 
stepped forward. •' This gentleman and 
I are old acquaintances ! He is a left- 
over from the worshipful committee and 
has the talent of blowing warm and cool 
at once. Drop your hand from that col- 
lar, sir, else I'll break your arm !" 



" Instead of doing which — " replied 
Bent savagely, '' I ask — I demand your 
assistance. If you deny me 'tis but to 
confess that you are a false man — a 
double-faced villain !" 

With a sudden lowering of his brow 
Marcy exclaimed, "Thou sneak!" and 
raising his hand he struck the arm which 
held the rector a violent blow just above 
the elbow. The young man's grasp in- 
stantly relaxed, his arm dropping limply 
to his side. Seizing the benumbed limb, 
Marcy bent it backward, and catching his 
victim by the scruff of the neck marched 
the helpless clerk out of the room and 
down the stairs, his protests, now mingled 
with oaths, being no determent to his re- 
lentless captor. 

Down past the parlor in the open door 
of which stood Hetty, her hands convul- 
sively clasped, the struggling Bent was 
partly pushed and partly dragged to the 
front entrance. With a sudden move- 
ment the door was thrown open, and 
through a final impulse from behind the 
clerk was shot out before the astonished 
eyes of three men who were lounging 
under the butternut tree directly opposite. 

To be continued. 



MISS RUTH THOMPSON SPERRY, 

LOCAL HISTORIAN AND GENEALOGIST. 



BY MARY S. TUDOR. 



MISS Sperry in her valuable historical 
v/ork has laid her townspeople 
and the people of the State under a last- 
ing debt of gratitude, and it seems that 
SDme fitting expression of their sense of 
obligation is due from those who are so 
largely her beneficiaries. 

Ruth Thompson Sperry was born at 
East Windsor Hill, in the town of South 
Windsor, July 4th, 1854, and died Feb- 
ruary 22 nd, 1900. 

She was the daughter of Daniel Gilbert 
and Harriet Frances (Pelton) Sperry. 
Her father was a native of Woodbridge, 
Conn. He died in 1885. Her mother 
was born in East Windsor and is still liv- 
ing at East Windsor Hill. 

Miss Sperry was a lineal descendant of 
Richard Sperry, who came to New Haven 
in 1643, to whom was granted a large 
tract of land on the west side of West 
Rock. He was a friend and protector of 
the Regicides and supplied them with 
food while concealed in a cave in West 
Rock, a place still pointed out to visitors 
interested in colonial history. 

Among her paternal ancestors in the 
New Haven colony are found the names 
of Gilbert, Todd, Cooper, Heaton (or 
Eaton) , Wilmot and Carrington. 

Her mother was descended from John 
Pelton, who came to Boston in 1634, and 
her ancestors among the early settlers of 
Windsor bear the familiar names of Grant, 



Gaylord, Moore, Bissell, Drake, Clark 
and Prior. 

Her brother, Gilbert Daniel, went west 
in i860, and at the breaking out of the 
civil war enlisted in the loth Illinois Cav- 
alry Vols. He served his country faith- 
fully till his death in a hospital in Forsythe 
Mission in 1862. 

Her sister. Dr. Edla Sperry was educa- 
ted at the Connecticut Literary Institute 
at Suffield, graduated from the Woman's 
Medical College of Pennsylvania, contin- 
ued the study of medicine in Paris and 
pursued the practice of her profession at 
Pittsburg, Pa. She died in 1880. 

Her only living brother is ex- congress- 
man Lewis Sperry, a practicing lawyer of 
Hartford, who represented the first district 
of Connecticut in the 52nd and 53rd con- 
gresses. 

Miss Sperry graduated from Mount 
Holyoke College in the class of 1875, 
where she sustained the reputation she 
had previously borne of superior scholar- 
ship. 

She had literary tastes and quite early 
they were directed into historical channels. 

Her work in assisting Dr. Stiles to pre- 
pare his History of Ancient Windsor 
brought her name into prominence. 

Dr. Stiles says of her in the preface to 
his first volume, — " Providence has sup- 
plied me with a most efficient helper in 
Miss Ruth T. Sperry, of East Windsor 



164 



MISS RUTH THOMPSON SPERRY. 



165 



Hill, to whose unwearied enthusiasm and 
tact in the collection of material, both 
historic and genealogical, the good people 
of East and South Windsor will owe far 
more than they can ever repay." 

This State can furnish none who excel 
her in her special line of research, and 
probably no one who equals her. 



his or her family genealogy to her untiring 
research and study. 

Scarcely an old attic in her native 
town but was to her a familiar hunt- 
ing ground, and a clue once found was 
followed to its remotest results, — to this 
end she went from place to place, spend- 
ing days and weeks conning the yellow 




MISS SPERRY. 



It would be interesting to follow her 
methods in bringing to light obscure 
points in local history and genealogy and 
her persistance in pursuing them. 

If ^* genius is a capacity for infinite 
painstaking," she certainly had genius. 

Many a descendant of Ancient Windsor 
— and here are included numbers of illus- 
trious names — owes the preservation of 



pages of town records or among the 
stones of deserted graveyards, often driv- 
ing long distances to remote places far 
from railroads and off the line of travel. 

One can hardly exaggerate the enthu- 
siasm and perseverance which she threw 
into her work of investigation. To her it 
it was truly a labor oi' love, none the less 
it was labor of an exhausting and wearing 



1 66 



MISS RUTH THOMPSON S PERRY. 



nature, and those who knew her best feel 
that her vital energies were overdrawn 
and her life shortened by the unstinted 
devotion she gave to her chosen pro- 
fession. 

After she became an authority in the 
genealogies of the Windsors, great de- 
mands were made on her by descendants 
remote and near, — in fact more than she 
should or could respond to. 

The towns of East and South Windsor 
are indebted to her for a most carefully 
prepared and — so far as existing records 
allow — complete history of these towns 
in the Revolutionary War. She has pre- 
served and put into available form a mass 
of historic matter, which, but for her im- 
portant work, would have been lost to 
future generations. 

This work covers nearly a hundred 
pages in Stiles History of Ancient Wind- 
sor, and passes on to posterity a story of 
which East Windsor's descendants may 
well be proud. 

Even the dates of Miss Sperry's birth 
and death seem to link her to Revolu- 
tionary History, they being July 4th, 1854 
(Independence Day), and February 22nd, 
1900 (Washington's Birthday) . 

She was an enthusiastic lover of old 
manuscripts and books, and had in her 
possession a valuable collection of original 
papers, letters, books, manuscripts and 
maps, — some of great interest. 

She was petite and sprightly in person, 
and an entertaining and original con- 
versationalist. She was a member of the 
First Congregational Church of South 



Windsor and will long be pleasantly and 
lovingly remembered by her towns- 
people for her personal virtues and graces, 
with a grateful appreciation of the debt 
they owe to her historical work. 

She rests from her labors and her 
works do follow her. 

RESOLUTIONS PASSED ON THE DEATH OF 
MISS SPERRY. 

The Martha Pitkin Wolcott Chapter of 
The Daughters of the American Revolu- 
tion, of East Hartford and South Windsor, 
at a meeting held on February the 22nd, 
1900, appointed a committee to draft 
suitable resolutions on the death of Miss 
Ruth T. Sperry, who submit the following 
report : 

RESOI^vkd, That this Chapter place 
upon formal record its grateful apprecia- 
tion of the valuable services rendered by 
Miss Sperry to Revolutionary History and 
especially to Bast Windsor and South 
Windsor and their descendants in the 
pains-taking and exhaustive historical 
work she has done for her native town, 
through which much has been preserved, 
that, except for her labor of love, would 
have been lost to posterity. 

RKS01.VED, also. That the assurance of 
the deep sympathy of the Chapter be con- 
veyed to her bereaved family, and that the 
action of the meeting be published in the 
Connecticut Magazine. 



True copy. 



[Signed] 



Dr. Mary S. Tudor, 

Miss Harriet T. Kii^bourne, 

Committee. 




BERLIN : A SKETCH 



REV. MAGEE PRATT. 



TO those who are fond of country life 
there are not many places in the 
State that have more attractions than 
Berlin street. Some villages that I have 
seen look as though the ebbing tides of 
life had cast up the wreckage of human 
kind and the hovels in which they pass 
their days and had left them stranded, 
in hopeless desolation, to wait for utter 



horizon frame them in as a picture of 
transcendent glory. Such an one is Ber- 
lin street. Built on a ridge that rises 
from level plain and undulating valley, it 
draws to a focus in itself the attractions 
of all its surroundings ; and when the 
great elms don their dress in spring, and 
the lawns are fresh and bright, and the 
flowers shine in azure and in gold, it is 




BERIvIN STKEKT. 



decay in dreary isolation from all good 
things. There are villages that are beau- 
tiful with a beauty that no city can rival. 
From the center of life and activity that 
gathers round the house of Ood, the 
fields and streams, the hills and woods 
stretch away in hues of mottled green 
and sheen of purple mass to where, all 
round, the blues and grays of the far 



a vision worth going many a mile to see. 
I think it safe to assert of all the 
places I know, that the outward and 
visible is always the concrete embodi- 
ment of the inward and spiritual. Habits 
of thought and feeling, qualities of emo- 
tion and desire, seek expression. A beau- 
tiful home is the photograph of a beauti- 
ful soul ; a fair village, of cultured inhabit- 



167 



68 



BERLIN: A SKETCH. 



ants; and of Berlin street this is surely 
so. Of the arts that make life worthy, of 
the occupations that enrich the country, 
it has disciples ; the music, poetry, paint- 
ing and literaturejof the State are the bet- 
ter for the labor of its people, the world's 
store of knowledge^has been added to by 
its sons and daugh- 
ters. It is not a 
large place, but large 
forces have gone 
from it and changed 
the life o f men ; 
religion and philan- 
thropy have been 
and are the motive 
forces that sway the 
doings of many of 
i t s denizens ; and, 
better than all, it is 
not — like some men 
and some inhabitants 
— content to merely 
live on the prestige 
of a good history : 
it is still inspired 
with a strong life 
impulse that keeps it 
strong and healthy 
and active. 

There are many 
advantages in city 
life ; one is, that the 
people who are in- 
tellectaally lazy can 
have good preachers 
and good lecturers 
who will do their 
thinking for them, and they can be really 
well informed by diligently fulfilling the 
function of an echo to the words of the 
great souls who think for both themselves 
and others. In a village this grand oppor- 
tunity is lost, and those who desire to 
know something about the vast problems 
of life and society are compelled to 



think them out for themselves. In some 
villages this desire seeks aid through the 
literary societies that are so numerous. 
If the desire for knowledge is weak and 
shallow, the meeting of the society con- 
sists mainly of a magazine article, strong 
coffee, sweet cake and small talk — fare 




DR. E. brande;ge;e;. 

that suits a weak mind, but which a 
strong one cannot digest. The society 
in Berlin is of a different sort. The 
papers are original and mean something, 
an earnest attempt to let light into the 
mysteries of life, a real desire to lead 
people on in the difficult road to wisdom, 
a close application to the facts of the 



BERLIN: A SKETCH. 



169 




DEACON AI^FRED NORTH. 

past to learn their meaning, — as all good 
societies of the sort try to do. They 
endeavor to make the matters they study 
reflect the , many-sided questions of life, 
and their studies are truly educational 
and serve a better purpose than to while 
away a winter night. They stretch the 
powers of vision of the soul, and make 
the opaque curtain that hides the real 
meaning of things away from us a little 
thinner, so that the truth that is so lumin- 
ous in itself may shine more clearly 
through. 

It is very interesting to the true hunter 
for the causes of things to hark back from 
present knowledge and possession to the 
remote causes that gave them being. 
And the advantage of this pursuit in 
America is that the whole process is 
focussed within the limits of our vision. 

The land around Berlin must have 
been very dreary two hundred and fifty 
years ago — a great swamp on one side of 



the village and hills and valleys covered 
with forests everywhere else. Difficulty 
is despair and death to the weak heart, 
but a stimulus to the strong man who has 
faith both in God and in himself. The 
people who came to Berlin first must have 
been of the best that is possible. We know 
this both from what they did and from 
the sons and daughters that were born of 
them. Piety, perseverance and courage 
are good equipment for the struggle with 
adverse circumstances, and heroic quali- 
ties spring to life in the battle. The 
early Berliners believed in the Bible, and 
set themselves to have dominion over the 
soil, and the peach and apple bloom that 
gladdens the eyes to-day make their 
wreath of victory. The story of the fight 
is a strange one, and very attractive. 
They used all the arts of war to win their 
purpose ; they entered into the realm of 
mechanics, of education, of religion and 




BMMA HART WILLARD. 



I/O 



BERLIN: A SKETCH. 



of art to conquer, and won all along the 
line. See what the advance guard did in 
the fields of trade and commerce, and 
you have the ingenious, persistent, enter- 
prising Yankee spirit at its best. 

W. Patterson came from Ireland, I 
believe ; but it does not matter from 
whence he came. A man 
of the right sort can be born 
anywhere, and if he breathes 
Yankee air he inhales the 
Yankee soul. And he set 
to work to make the first tin 
ware that was ever made in 
the United States. Bless 
him, and turn me loose in a 
dairy where on a shelf of 
white scrubbed wood the 
rows of shining tins are 
filled with the yellow es- 
sence of the buttercup and 
the condensed sunshine in 
the garnered grass, and you 
may hide your patent cream- 
ers anywhere while I drink 
to the memory of W. Patter- 
son. But he and his could 
make more tinware than 
housewives of Berlin could 
use, and so other of the 
Berlin geniuses went to work 
and evolved that convey- 
ance o f triumphant com- 
merce, the peddlers wagon, 
sign manual of the trader's 
soul and pioneer of business 
everywhere. And the wagon 
went, and the tinware too, down South 
to be gems in the eyes of the negroes ; 
or nearer, to help Dutch housewives 
dream of the Zuyder Zee, and the cows 
of the homeland. And it did more 
than this. It took the threads of mutual 
dependence, thin then as a spider's 
web, and linked state to state, and so 
helped bind the whole land together, 



as it is bound to-day by bonds of com- 
merce that are strong as chains of 
adamant. 

The comb is a mile-stone on the road 
of progress. When the first savage woman 
took the tooth of an elephant and set to 
work to take the tangle out of her hair. 




ABIGAII. PATTERSON. 

she moved on to better things. It was a 
step in the evolution of the race, and that 
tool of the civilizing spirit was made in 
Berlin in early days, made of horn or 
turtle shell. There were giants in those 
days, and they lived in the great swamp, 
and their shells made good combs. Who 
made them I do not know, but he must 
have been a knightly soul, and his chiv- 



BERLIN: A SKETCH. 



171 



airy spent itself in the service of beauty, 
— and he did well. But a better service 
than his was that of the elder Elisha 
Brandegee. The first cotton thread made 
in America came from his factory in 
Berlin, and knowing something of the 
family, good, honest thread it must have 
been, I dare affirm ; and the spirits of 
Peace and Order were his handmaidens. 
The emblem of disorder and difficulty 
is a tangled skein, and all thread was in 
skeins before his day. Think of the 
misery that meant; of impatient men 
and hectored women ; of knots and 
snarls that could not be loosed ; of the 
knife and the growl and the waste. Then 
thank the man who made the spool, and 
wound the thread about it before he sent it 
forth to prevent anger and waste, and to 
stay the tears of boys and girls who, long- 
ing for romp and game, were made to 
kneel at their mother's feet with hands 
outstretched, not only in unuttered sup- 
plication for liberty, but visibly to hold 




/ 



411 pi 




THE IvIBRARY 



THE CONGREGATIONAI, CHURCH. 

the skein of thread while the tired wcman 
wound it in a ball. 

The father had benevolence directed 
by ingenuity ; his son, Dr. E. Brandegee, 
had love governed by skill of a higher 
sort, and he served all Berlin town for 
forty-seven years, not only as physician, 
but as friend and father. In all weathers 
and at all hours he was ready to minister 
to ;the troubled in body or in mind. 
And you may go even now, long after his 
death, to every part of the scattered 
town and listen to the tales of his devo- 
tion and skill, of his care for all who 
trusted him with life and health. And, 
as one said to me, it was no use for 
another doctor to start in Berlin while 
Dr. Brandegee was alive, the folks would 
have no one but him. He was twin 
brother in soul to that other doctor that 
all Drumtochty loved across the sea. 



12 



1/2 



BERLIN: A SKETCH. 




RESIDENCE OF FRANK I.ANDGON WILCCX. 

And they made cloaks and fur caps, 
and corrugated iron shingles, and leather, 
and hats, and pumps, and guns, and 
bayonets, and something else which they 
made I must not forget. If you have the 
history of the Bulkeley family you have 
the panorama of Berlin life from the time 
the first white man walked there. The 
family reflects the progress of the town, 
and in one of its latest members gathers 
it up in itself, for one honored Bulkeley 
has been town clerk for years, and knows 
more of it than any other man, I think. 
But two of his ancestors, J. and W. Bul- 
keley, beheved that Berlin had passed 
the tin age, and they symbolized its 
growth by making German silver spoons. 
And those spoons meant much beside. The 
doom of the log house and its one long 
room with bed at one end and table at 
the other. It meant a best parlor and 
pictures on the walls, and it opened a 
vista where the goal at the end was lots 
of stock in the Bridge Company, and a 
surplus at the bank. 

Here in New England we sit in our 
churches on Sunday and listen to singing 
and music so transporting that some- 
times, when it stops, we have to shake 
ourselves and look at our friends in the 
next pews to make quite sure that 
we are not in heaven. And dear old 
Jedidiah Norton was at the beginning of 
it. He gave the first organ that was ever 



played in a Congregational meeting on 
this side of the Atlantic to the Berlin 
church, and it was used for many a year, 
t'lough, alas ! it was destroyed by incen- 
diary fire at last. 

Berlin has done much for education. 
The North family, especially two brothers, 
were prominent for years at Hamilton, 
and Deacon Alfred North served for 
years at home in furthering and fostering 
the cause. It is hard to do justice to the 
man. The records read that he was 
treasurer of the church, superintendent 
of the Sunday school and town clerk for 
more than forty years. But records are 
wooden things at the best. He was a 
noble spirited public man, not a machine 
politician full of self-seeking. He had a 
mighty intellect, too great to do a selfish 
or a mean thing, always desiring other 
people to have the best of everything, 
and living to put it in their reach ; the 
mind of a judge, the heart of a philan- 
thropist, the life of a saint. 



1 



FRANK I^ANGDON WII^COX. 



BERLIN: A SKETCH. 



173 



And Berlin had noble women not a 
ftw, and has some yet. Of those that are 
gone, perhaps Emma Hart Williard was 
the chief. If the village had given no 
other woman to the state it should be 
thanked heartily for her. She taught in 
the academy at home for years, and then 
went to Troy, N. Y., where she married, 
and founded the seminary for women 
there, giving education of the best to be 
had in the land. Four hundred pupils at 
a time were under her care. She enriched 
the literature of the country with several 



flies. Miss Abigail Patterson was the 
quintessence of that variety of woman, 
and she just lived caring for others. She 
belonged to everybody that had anything 
the matter with them, and never disputed 
the ownership. And so many are the 
troubles of life that she was never free. 
She was not a rich woman. She lived in 
a tumbledown old house and lived long 
and well, till a year or two ago she was 
sent for to go to a world where gold is not 
the currency and rank is not the social 
dividing line. And if what I think is 



.^ftjfe 




WORKS OF THE BERIyIN IRON BRIDGE COMPANY, 1878. 



works, and thousands of women who 
were intellectually born through her 
ministry rise up and call her blessed. 

There are some women who never 
belong to themselves. They live, in the 
service of piety, to the needs and woes of 
others every hour of life ; they are made 
that way. They come into the room 
where you are sick and it grows brighter ; 
they just lay their hands on the crumpled 
sheet and the bed is made soft and cool ; 
they stroke your hair and headaches are 
forgotten ; they speak and the heartache 



true she is a member of the best aristoc- 
racy now and very much surprised at the 
honors heaped upon her. 

And the women that are left are doing 
well. They have started and carried on 
for three years a splendid school for 
girls, securing the services of Miss Parks, 
a graduate of Mount Holyoke Seminary, 
as principal. Their curriculum is com- 
plete. They prepare girls for college and 
try to fit them as well tor a useful life- 
They call it after the old village name, 
the Worthington School. And then the 



174 



BERLIN: A SKETCH. 



women carry on a good public library, — 
good in the sense that the books are 
good. It is not a very large one ; why 
should it be? It will hold all the really 
good literature fit for the service of the 
ordinary reader that is printed in the 
English language, and then leave room for 
all the best that will be issued for years 
to come. And the Berlin people want 
the best of everything, and generally, I 
think, find the way to get it. 

Berlin possesses a handsome Congrega- 
tional church with a preacher to match. 
I am told that the church spire and vane 
is so high that they have never yet been 
able to get the whole of it in one picture. 



tions, and the present Frank Wilcox well 
remembers the traditions of the name. 
He was clerk of the judiciary commission 
in 1893, did good work as the town rep- 
resentative in the House, and lives for 
the good of the town. He has worked 
in the development of the Iron Bridge 
Company and helped in its success. 

The company began to make bridges 
in 1870 and employed about twenty men. 
Now there are over five hundred at work, 
and the product goes not only all over 
America but to foreign countries as well. 
Over two milHons of dollars worth of 
business is done in one year. I cannot 
find room for details. Many have worked 














WORKS OF THE BKRI.IN IRON BRIDGE) COMPANY, I9OO. 



But the story of the church is too long 
and too good a story to be spoiled in one 
or two short paragraphs. 

I wish I had more room to tell of 
other worthy people in Berlin, but one 
thing claims the rest of my space. It is 
the culmination of Berlin enterprise, the 
epitome of its intelligence and energy. 
An old German professor used to say to 
me, *' Civilization is roads," and good 
roads are dependent upon good bridges, 
and the best of all good bridges are made 
in East Berlin. 

The Wilcox family has been one of the 
leading families in the town for genera- 



in the enterprise who deserve mention, 
but one man must not be left out of the 
story, the Hamlet in the drama of its his- 
tory, Charles M. Jarvis. He is the presi- 
dent of the company and the hero of its 
struggles for place and power. And if 
work is better than idleness, and the 
genius of construction mightier than nat- 
ural obstacles, then he is worthy of all re- 
nown as a man strong in the arts of peace. 
And ere I lay down my pen I must say one 
word for a friend I loved and who lived 
and died well. Burr K. Field was true 
and wise and kind, a servant of God and 
man, able in business, royal in friendship, 



BECAUSE OF YOU. 



175 



self-sacrificing in public service, a pattern 
husband, a loving father, and, of all the 
men who have lived in the village of Ber- 



lin none endeavored to do it better ser- 
vice than he. 



BECAUSE OF YOU. 



What have you done for me, dear one, 

With your eyes so true? 
This grim old world looks golden-bright — 

Because of you. 

What have you done for me, dear heart. 

With your lips so true? 
The words of others kindly seem — 

Because of you. 

What have you done for me, my own, 

With your hand so true ? 
The clasp of others heartfelt feels — 

Because of you. 

Queen of my heart and queen of queens, 

With your love so true — 
The years would drag with leaden feet, 

Wer't not for you ! 

Claribel Egbert. 





HOX. HENRY C. ROBINSON. 



176 



THE HON. HENRY C. ROBINSON. 



BY W. H. C. PYNCHON. 



THE death of Hon. Henry C. Robin- 
son, which took place on February 
14th, deprived the state of one of its most 
honored and best beloved citizens. Mr. 
Robinson was born in Hartford on August 
28th, 1832, and his career has always 
been identified with the city. He was a 
graduate of the Hartford High School, 
and from that institution entered Yale 
College in the class of '53 at the same 
time with many men who have since 
achieved prominence, among them Hon. 
Andrew D. White, ex-president of Cor- 
nell University and ambassador to Ger- 
many ; Bishop Davies of Michigan ; Dr. 
Charlton T. Lewis and Dr. James M. 
Whiton of New York ; the late Isaac H. 
Bromley ; George W. Smalley, Washing- 
ton correspondent of the London Times, 
and for many years the London corre- 
spondent of the New York Tribune , 
United States Senator R. L. Gibson ; the 
Hon. B. K. Phelps ; E. C. Steadman of 
New York, the poet; the late S. M. 
Capron ; Julius Catlin ; General Edward 
Harland of Norwich ; Dr. William M. 
Hudson ; Hon. Wayne MacVeagh ; the late 
Judge Edward W.Seymour of the Supreme 
Court ; Judge Shiras of the United States 
Supreme Court ; Dr. Henry P. Stearns and 
the late George H. Watrous, formerly 
president of the Consolidated road. 

After taking his degree he entered the 
law office of his brother, Lucius F. Robin- 
son, and later became his partner. After 
the death of his brother he continued the 
business alone, but later, at two different 



times, took his two sons into partnership, 
the firm becoming known as Robinson & 
Robinson. 

In r872 he was elected rAayor of 
Hartford and he then took prominent 
part in the proceedings which caused 
Hartford to become the sole capital of 
the state. His whole administration was 
marked by exceptional abiHty and thor- 
oughness. In 1879, i^ company with 
General Lucius A. Barbour, he was elected 
to the General Assembly and became 
chairman of the jut^.iciary committee and 
leader of the House. Three times he 
was nominated for governor — by acclama- 
tion, and he was chosen a member of the 
national republican convention which 
nominated Garfield and Arthur, and he 
drafted a large portion of the platform 
which was finally adopted. 

Mr. Robinson was as well known in 
business as he was in politics. He was 
counsel for many leading corporations 
and was a director of many others. 
Among these may be named the New 
York, New Haven & Hartford Railroad 
Company, the Connecticut Mutual Life 
Insurance Company, the Connecticut 
Fire Insurance Company, the Hartford 
Steam Boiler Inspection and Insurance 
Company and the Connecticut Trust and 
Safe Deposit Company. He was also a 
member of the Hartford Board of Trade, 
and was for several years president of the 
Republican Club of Hartford. But it is 
impossible to review all his pul^lic ser- 
vices ; it is needless to say that in his 



177 



178 



HON. JAMES PHELPS. 



death city and state suffer a loss the 
measure of which can hardly be esti- 
mated. 

But though Mr. Robinson will long be 
remembered for his public services, it is 
the memory of his character and person- 
ality that will live the longest. For 
integrity in business, for honor in politics, 
for wisdom and ability in all his public 
life, he is admired and esteemed, but it 



is for his cheerfulness, his geniality, his 
sympathy in the joys and sorrows of his 
fellow-men that he will always be held in 
loving remembrance by all who knew 
him. He has done all things well; and 
by precept and example, by his public 
and private life, has shown himself to be 
that which all honest men yearn to be — a 
Man. 



HON. JAMES PHELPS. 



BY THOMAS D. COULTER. 



Hon. James Phelps was^born^in^^Cole- 
brook, Litchfield County, Conn., January 
12, 1822 ; received his early education in 
the common schools of his native town, 
in Winsted Academy, and the Episcopal 
Academy at Cheshire. He entered 
Washington (now Trinity) College, but 
owing to a very severe illness in the first 
year of his course was obliged to discon- 
tinue his studies for a considerable 
period. When he was able to resume 
them he was entered as a law student in 
the office of Hon. Isaac Toucey of Hart- 
ford, and subsequently in the office of 
Hon. Samuel Ingham of Essex, and was 
also for a time a student in the Law 
Department of Yale College ; was admit- 
ted to the bar in Middlesex County, 
October, 1845, ^i^d has since resided in 
Essex in that county. 

Besides holding the office of judge of 
probate and other local positions he was 
a member of the House of Representa- 
tives in the State Legislatures in 1853, 
1854 and 1856, and the State Senate in 



1858 and 1859. In 1863 he was elected 
by the General Assembly a Judge of the 
Superior Court for the regular term of 
eight years. He was re-elected in 1871, 
and in 1873 he was elected a Judge of the 
Supreme Court of Errors. He resigned 
in 1875 01^ his election to the Forty- 
fourth Congress from the Second Con- 
gressional district, composed of the 
counties of New Haven and Middlesex. 
He was re-elected to the Forty-fifth, 
Forty-sixth and Forty-seven Congresses, 
and declined further Congressional ser- 
vice. He was again elected a Judge of 
the Supreme Court in January, 1885, 
which position he held until disqualified 
by age in 1892. 

While in Congress he was placed on 
the committees of ways and means, for- 
eign affiirs, reform in civil service, and 
other important standing committees, 
and on several special committees, among 
which was that to investigate alleged 
frauds in the State of Louisiana in the 
Presidential election of 1876. In the 



HON. JAMES PHELPS. 



179 






contest in the special session of the 
Forty-sixth Congress, between the execu- 
tive and legislative departments of the 
Government, with regard to the appoint- 
ment and service of United States 
deputy marshals, and the employment of 



cured the establishment of the break- 
water at the entrance of New Haven 
harbor, and the extensive permanent 
work for the improvement of the Con- 
necticut River below Hartford and at its 
mouth, and secured liberal appropriations 




HON. JAMKS PHEIvPS. 



United States soldiers at the polls where 
elections were being held, he was selected 
as one of the joint committee of Demo- 
cratic Senators and Representatives to 
consider and recommend suitable legisla- 
tion on that exciting subject. He pro- 



for those and other needed improvements 
in this district. 

He was a constant attendant of St. 
John's Episcopal Church, and was one of 
its chief supporters. 

After leaving the bench on account of 



8o 



CALLED BACK. 



being disqualified by age, in 1892, he 
continued his law practice until his death 
on January 15 th, 1900. 

Judge Phelps's wife was Miss Lydia A. 
Ingham, the daughter of Hon. Samuel 
Ingham, a lawyer of great prominence in 
the State, several times Speaker of the 
lower House of the General Assembly, a 
member of Congress with Isaac Toucey 
and Dr. Phelps, and United States Com- 
missioner of Patents during President 
Buchanan's administration. They had 
two children : Samuel Ingham Phelps, 
who died in Chattanooga, Tenn., on Jan. 



10, 1 89 1, and James Lancelot Phelps, an 
Essex lawyer, who was judge of probate 
and held other local offices. He died 
last year. 

Judge Phelps was president of the Say- 
brook Bank of Essex at the time of his 
death. Judge Phelps was a man of great 
personal magnetism, as is shown in the 
fact that party lines were not considered 
when he was nominated for important 
offices. His election to high positions 
has upon several occasions been unani- 
•mous. 



CALLED BACK. 



For only a moment we met. 

Here, in this new, strange place ; 
Her name sounds strange to me, yet, 

Something there is in her face. 

Her eyes, and her gliding grace, 
I remember, and still forget. 

I know her not, but I know 

That either in dreams long fled. 

Or a life lived ages ago. 

Or in the realms of the dead, 
(Whether in heaven o'erhead, 

On earth, or in hell below.) 



I have seen her face with its rare 

Soft midnight eyes, and the light 

Of her shimmering crown of hair, 

And her grace like a wild birds flight, 
And the woman I met last night 

I have known and loved — somewhere. 

A. H. T. Fisher. 



OUR COLLEGES. 



EDITED BY CRANSTON BRENTON. 




VIEW FROM THE WESI^EYAN GROUNDS. 



WESLEY AN. 

WESLEYAN'S Annual Washington 
Birthday Banquet was attended 
by about 300 people — the facuUy, alumni, 
undergraduates and visiting " sub-fresh- 
men " being well represented. The 
presence of delegates from Amherst and 
Williams added greatly to the good fel- 
lowship and interest of the occasion, and 
made all appreciate the privilege and 
value of a league with two colleges whose 
spirit and traditions have so much in 
common with ours. The Glee Club sang 
some new Wesleyan songs, and im- 
promptu calls for solos were responded 
to by Hartzel), '03 ; Montgomery, '02 and 
Burdick, '99. The toastmaster for the 
occasion was Dr. E. M. Mills, '72, and 
toasts were responded t>o by President 
B. P. Raymond; Rev. C. E. Davis, '76; 
Pastor of Tremont St. M, E. Church, 



Boston ; Prof. W. O. Atwater, '65 ; and 
many others. 

The sixth Annual Gymnasium Exhi- 
bition given in Fayerweather Gymnasium 
on Thursday evening, March 29th, was a 
pronounced success. The class drills in 
competition for the Olin Prize Cup were 
the best ever seen and the competition 
for the Wallace Cup for best all round 
gymnast was hotly and closely contested. 
The judges of the exhibition were Paul 
C. Philips, M. D., Associate Professor of 
Hygeine aud Physical Education, Am- 
herst; George B. Velte, Gymnasium 
Director, Trinity; and Charles W. May- 
ser, Assistant Instructor, Yale Gymnasium. 
The Olin Prize Cup was awarded to the 
Senior Class, H. D. Byrnes, leader. This 
is the third time that the class of 1900 
has won the cup. W. R. Terry, '01, won 
the Wallace Cup, and title of College 
Gymnast; and A. W. Davis, 1900, won 



181 



l82 



OUR COLLEGES. 



the finals in the fencing tournament, 
securing a fine pair of foils and title of 
champion fencer. 

Dr. W. H. Evans, of the U. S. Depart- 
ment of Agriculture, one of the represen- 
tatives of the United States Government 
Exhibit at the coming Paris Exposition, 
visited the college about the middle of 
March to arrange for the shipment of 
models ot the Atwater-Rosa respiration 
colorimeter and other apparatus used 
here, which are to be included in the 
government exhibit. The model of the 
colorimeter was made by Mr. O. S. 
Blakeslee, the college mechanician. Al- 
though of reduced size, it represent the 
different parts of the apparatus, including 
the respiration chamber, the Blakeslee 
meter pump, and other measuring devices. 
With the model of the respiration colori- 
meter will also be sent a Comb colorimeter 
as made by Mr. Blakeslee, under the 
direction of Prof. Atwater, and used in 
numerous laboratories for measuring the 
beats of combustion of chemical com- 
pounds, including various food materials. 

The base ball and track teams have 
been in active practice in the cage and 
the gymnasium, and on the track and 
diamond whenever the weather would 
permit, since the last of February. Cap- 
tain Anderson intends to make a heavier 
hitting and faster base running team than 
last year, and for this purpose a second 
team will be kept up all through the 
season for the purpose of playing prac- 
tice games with the " varsity " until the 
season is well under way. The personnel 
of the team is not yet settled. All the 
members of last year's team are practic- 
ing with the squad this year, with the 
exception of Townsend and Raymond, 
both of whom we loose by graduation. 
There is, however, some good material 
in the Freshman class, and a successful 
season is expected. The management 



has arranged twenty-four games including 
among them Yale, Brown, Cornell, Dart- 
mouth, Columbia, Holy Cross, U. V. M., 
Amherst, Williams and Syracuse. The 
work of the track team under Capt. 
Billington has been thus far mostly in the 
line of indoor work, and cross-country 
runs. 

Frank E. Wing. 



YALE. 

THAT the spirit of democracy which 
has always characterized Yale still 
exists has been made more than evident 
at New Haven during the past month by 
the magnitude and strength of the popu- 
lar uprising of the undergraduates against 
the existence of the Sophomore societies. 
Of recent years these organizations have 
become so powerful at Yale that they have 
been able to control both the political and 
and social sides of the Yale undergraduate 
life. As their membership is decidedly 
limited, embracing only one-seventh of 
the members in the average class, it was 
only natural that there should have been 
protests from the rest of the class. 

Probably the three Sophomore societies 
have been blamed for many evils for 
which they were not responsible, as the 
feeling against them has become so strong 
of recent years. However, it is generally 
agreed that the fundamental defect in the 
present society system at Yale lies in the 
fact that fewer men are chosen for socie- 
ties in Sophomore year than in Junior 
year. The inevitable tendency is for the 
few men in Sophomore societies to use 
the power which comes with organization 
to further their own advantage. Of 
course there have been times when this 
charge could not be made against the 
Sophomore societies, but the history of 
the past few years is sufficiently well 



OUR COLLEGES. 



183 



known to warrant the statement. It has 
also been pointed out that the fifty-one 
men selected for Sophomore societies are 
chosen too early in their college course, 
thus giving undue importance to " prep " 
school or family pull rather than to choose 
men for what they had done for Yale after 
a sufficient time had elapsed for their 
classmates to have passed judgment upon 
them. When these men are selected they 
are at once thrown in with upper class- 
men and a large handicap given them 
over the rest of the class. Membership 
in a Sophomore society practically assures 
one of an election to a Junior fraternity. 
The Sophomore society men are in the 
majority in the Junior fraternities, and 
they take advantage of this fact to run 
them, for their own interest, thus causing a 
breach in the fraternities which is largely 
responsible for the weakened condition of 
the fraternities at Yale to-day. Of recent 
years the power of the Sophomore 
society has become so great that member- 
ship in one has been considered almost a 
primary essential to an election to a 
Senior society. 

The fact that* such a small number of 
men were chosen for the greatest social 
distinction so early in the course and the 
continued abuse of their power, led to the 
recent social upheaval at Yale. A peti- 
tion calling for the abolition of the Sopho- 
more societies was circulated among the 
members of the present Senior class and 
was signed by practically every non- 
Sophomore society man in the class. 
The petition was presented to the faculty. 
A committee was chosen by the Sopho- 
more society men to confer with a com- 
mittee chosen by the petitioners in 
regard to a reform in the system and the 
petition was temporarily withdrawn from 
the faculty, pending a decision by the 
committee. The committees have been 
holding regular conferences during the 



past several weeks, and it is expected that 
some decided change will be made in the 
Yale social system. The ''pyramid system" 
having the largest societies in Sopho- 
more year and then by a process of 
elimination secure the best men for senior 
societies, is most popular among the 
undergraduate body. 

The death of Professor E. J. Phelps 
occurred on March nth, and caused 
universal regret among all Yale men. 
Professor Phelps was ex-ambassador to 
England, and was at the head of the de- 
partment of constitutional law at Yale. 
He had been ill with pneumonia for 
several weeks, and it was thought that he 
was on the road to recovery when it was 
discovered that he had an abscess on one 
of his lungs. This resulted in his death. 
Professor Phelps was popular everywhere, 
and many expressions of sorrow over his 
loss were received from all parts of the 
world. 

At the regular meeting of the corpora- 
tion of the university held March i6th it 
was decided to call Prof. Chas. C. Torrey 
from Andover to accept the chair of 
Semitic languages. Henry S. Graves, '92, 
was made a professor in the new course 
in forestry which is being offered at Yale. 

Much trouble has been experienced at 
Yale in securing adequate postal arrange- 
ments. The college, although situated in 
the center of the city, has only enjoyed 
two mail deliveries per day. Recently a 
committee of influential students went to 
Washington and saw the Postmaster- 
General in regard to the matter, and now 
it is definitely announced that Yale will 
have a post-office on the campus. 

Religious activity at Yale has been 
greater this Spring than ever before in 
the history of the college. The member- 
ship in D wight Hall, the Yale Young 
Men's Christian Association, has increased 
during the past year from 500 to S50. 



1 84 



OUR COLLEGES. 



This is the largest college religious 
organization in the world and Yale is 
justly proud of the fact, especially in 
view of recent unwarranted criticism of 
the undergraduate life at Yale. The pop- 
ularity of religious work at Yale can be 
attributed primarily to the fact that no 
distinction is made among denominations. 
At the annual meeting of the active 
members of Dwight Hall, held March 
26th, Paul D. Moody was elected presi- 
dent for the ensuing year, John F. Ferry 
and Edwin Allen Stebbins were chosen 
vice-presidents, and Henry B. Wright was 
re-elected to the office of graduate secre- 
tary. Mr. Moody, the new president, is 
the son of the late Dwight L. Moody. 

The annual Yale-Harvard debate was 
held at New Haven on March 30th. The 
question for debate was, "Resolved, 
That Porto Rico be included within the 
customs boundary of the United States." 
Yale supported the negative side. After 
a half hour's deliberation the judges an- 
nounced that they had decided in favor 
.of Harvard. The decision was not unan- 
imous, and all agreed that the debate had 
been exceedingly close. It was generally 
acknowledged that the Harvard men 
excelled the Yale debaters in elegance of 
presentation of argument. 

The base ball season opened on March 
31st at New Haven, with a game with the 
nine of the New York University. The 
game resulted in a victory for Yale by a 
score of 20 to 8. The game demon- 
strated that Yale has an exceedingly 
strong nine to represent her this year. 
The team will take a trip through the 
South during the Easter vacation. 

Eugene W. Ong. 



TRINITY. 

TRINITY'S indoor athletic meet, held 
March 23, was well attended, and 
brought out some promising track and 



field material. The McCrackan cup, 
awarded to the best all-round athlete, was 
won by Godfrey Brinley, 1901, of New- 
ington Junction, Conn., captain of the 
track team. The class cup, which goes 
to the class securing the greatest number 
of points, was secured by 190 1. 

The Whitlock prize oratorical compe- 
tition was held March 9. H. A. Hornor, 
1900, of New Orleans, won the first prize 
of ^30, and H. D. Wilson, Jr., of New 
York City, the second prize of ^20. The 
five contestants were also awarded the 
Alumni EngHsh Prizes of ;^io each. 
Trinity offers annually $2,320 in cash 
prizes, exclusive of scholarships. 

The base ball and football schedules 
for the season of 1900 have been an- 
nounced. Trinity will play base ball 
games at home with Yale Law School, 
Georgetown, Ne^ York University, 
Amherst Agricultural College and Ford- 
ham; and outside games with Holy 
Cross, Brown, New York University, 
Amherst, Columbia, West Point, Crescent 
A. C, Tufts, Rockville and Fordham. 
The football team will meet the Amherst 
Agricultural College, Wesleyan, New York 
University, Worcester Polytechnic Insti- 
tute and Massachusetts Institute of Tech- 
nology at Hartford and will play on the 
home grounds of Yale, Amherst, West 
Point and Hamilton. 

Trinity will send a relay team to the 
intercollegiate games to be held under 
the auspices of the University of Penn- 
sylvania, April 28, and will send the usual 
picked team to the New England inter- 
collegiate meet at Worcester, in May. 
The track and base ball squads are work- 
ing hard, and give every indication of 
making the season a success in both 
departments. 

The Hartford High School has ac- 
cepted Trinity's offer to form a triangular 
football league under the auspices of the 
college, and the constitution of the new 



SONG OF ACTION. 



i8s 



league has been drawn up. The names of 
the two other schools to be included in 
the league will be announced as soon as 
the negotiations now pending are con- 
cluded. The schools will compete for a 
trophy offered by Trinity, and the captain 
of the college football teams to be 
president of the league. Deciding games 
will be played on the Trinity grounds. 

The old Tennis Association has been 
re-organized, and Trinity will enter the 
new inter-collegiate league now being 
formed. A decided increase in " college 
spirit " and all that pertains to the better- 



ing of our Alma Mater's welfare seems to 
be the dominant influence in student 
affairs just now. 

The 1901 annual, the Ivy, will be dedi- 
cated to the Rev. Dr. Samuel Hart, who 
was connected with the college for over 
thirty years, and is now vice-dean of the 
Berkeley Divinity School, Middletown, 
Conn. This is the second Ivy which has 
borne Dr. Hart's name on the title-page, 
and such an honor shows the very high 
esteem in which he is held by his former 
students. 

James Albert Wales. 



SONG OF ACTION. 



The dipping sun beams bright, 

The prow drives deep and clean, 
And the wave crests break by the rolling wake, 

And jewel the changeful scene. 

The birds swoop low in flight 

O'er ribbons ot wind-tossed foam, 

As they swiftly fly from the farther sky 
To the sandy steeps of home. 

The harbor cliffs rear high, 

Their white arms stretching wide 

To claim from the seas my bark as it flees 
At front of the rising tide. 



My home's on the swerving strand, 

A haven from Ocean's strife, 
But hail to the sea where the world is free, 

And hail to the seaman's life. 

\V. Harry C lemons. 



HISTORICAL NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE. 



BY W. H. C. PYNCHON. 



WE are in receipt of an interesting 
letter from Rev. C. A. Wight, 
author of one of the sketches of James 
Gates Percival which appeared in our last 
number. This letter contains additional 
data concerning Hazel Green, Wis., and 
its mines, which are of very considerable 
interest. Letters of this nature are from 
time to time received, and the editor is 
sometimes considerably puzzled to decide 
to what portion of the magazine they 
properly belong. It is a pity that there 
are not more of these letters, for they fre- 
quently contain items of much general 
interest to the public and of very great 
special interest to the writer and the his- 
torian. 

It frequently occurs that a person read- 
ing some article in The Connecticut 
Magazine finds that he possesses some 
additional item of interest on that subject 
— an item of which the writer of the arti- 
cle was ignorant. Such readers are 
hereby cordially invited to write to this 
department, that the information they 
possess may contribute to the common 
good. The letters should be addressed 
to the editor of the department and 
should be concise, for space is necessarily 
limited. The writer should give his full 
name and address, as the readers of such 



articles frequently desire to enter upon 
further correspondence. It is hoped that 
this new feature will contribute much to 
the pleasure of those to whom The Con- 
necticut Magazine comes. 



There has recently come to our atten- 
tion a book plate which appears to be 
new to collectors of Connecticut ex- 
libris. It is that of Israel Butler, proba- 
bly a resident of Middletown or vicinity. 
It is roughly engraved, and follows so 
closely the style of the Jacob Sargeant 
plate that there can be no question but 
that the two were engraved by the same 
person. Sargeant, who was a jeweler in 
Hartford in the latter years of the last 
century, is credited with being the en- 
graver of his own plate. The Butler 
plate is about one-half the size of the 
Sargeant. It shows a lion rampant in an 
oval. The upper half of the oval is rep- 
resented as ermine, the lower half as 
azure. The crest is a bird with wings 
extended, and the name appears on a 
ribbon below the whole. The mantling is 
unmistakably like that of the Sargeant 
plate. 



i86 



HISTORICAL NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE. 187 

OUR ANCESTORS.* 



One of the Poems read at the Bi-Centennial Celebration of Durham, Connecti- 
cut, July 4th and 5th, 1899. 



BY CATHERINE W. FOWLER. 



As in a vision, still we see upon the village green 

Our great-grand-fathers' meeting house, neath sunny skies serene ; 

Without, the birds are jubilant ; within, the light is dim ; 

We hear their fervent songs arise— an old familiar hymn — 

The strains of Beulah, or of Ware, which oft we sing to-day, 
And from the summer world without, the scent of new-mown hay 
Is wafted through the open doors like incense's fragrant breath ; 
And Parson David Smith expounds salvation, sin and death. 

The deacons and their goodly wives, in sober garb arrayed. 
And many a sturdy youth is there and many a winsome maid 
Whose face beneath her great calash is like a soft blush rose. 
The while the parson's deep discourse to final "ninthly " flows. 

Each Sabbath found them in their place until their days were done. 
Their daily labors sanctified, their humble laurels won ; 
And then upon a hill that sloped toward the east and west. 
With winds to sing their requiem, they came at last to rest. 

A solemn sweet significance these leaning headstones bear ; 
Unwritten tales of joy and woe, of ecstacy and prayer; 
Memorials of faithful hearts now crumbled into dust, 
Their lives of hardship glorified by love and holy trust. 

For they were men of rigid traits in iron mould confined ; 
They harbored long dogmatic view of narrow heart and mind ; 
They dared not pluck the flowers of life, nor kneel at Beauty's shrine ; 
But strove through theologic feuds to find the light divine. 

Upon the letter of the law they laid the utmost stress. 
Mistaking oftentimes, for God, their own self-righteousness ; 
And yet how bright their virtues glow above the buried years 
To bid the sluggish soul arise and cast aside its fears. 

Some drops of Puritanic blood persistently remain 
Constraining us to earnestness, and with a fine disdain 
For problematic subtleties of modern wrong and right. 
Traditions keep the impulse true, howe'er confused the sight. 

The hero from their fibre springs — the martyr and the saint ; 
Be ours their fiery scorn of lies, their conscience and restraint ; 
And their unswerving courage ours, — their dignity of mien ; 
And ours their reverential awe for mysteries unseen. 



*This poem should have appeared in the last issue in connection with the Bi- 
Centennial Ode by Wedworth Wadsworth, but was unavoidably crowded out. — Editor. 

13 



CONNECTICUT PEOPLE WHO INTEREST US. 




ARTHUR T. HADLEY. PRESIDENT OF YALE COLLEGE- 
(From a photograph by Pach Bros., N. Y.) 



PRESIDENT Arthur T. Hadley of 
Yale, and President George William- 
son Smith of Trinity, two of our 
hardest working college presidents. 

1 88 



Though so much appears in the daily 
papers about college presidents it is a 
question if the public fully realizes how 
wide is their sphere of usefulness. The 



CONNECTICUT PEOPLE WHO INTEREST US. 



189 



college president is not simply the execu- 
tive head of the institution which he rep- 
resents ; he is more. It is through his 
energy that the institution keeps alive and 



students are brought in, that bequests are 
made to the institution, and that money 
is raised for nev/ buildings. Nor is his 
activity limited to the college alone. His 




REV. GEORGE WII.I.IAMSON SMITH. PRESIDENT OF TRINITY COLLEGE. 
(From a photograph by Stuart, Hartford.) 



abreast of the times. It is through his 
watchfulness that discipline and scholar- 
ship maintain their proper standard. It 
is through his individual efforts that 



influence is felt through all the prepara- 
tory schools, and he shapes in no incon- 
siderable degree the education of the boys 
who will later become college students. 



©EKlE^LigD^ 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Querists are requested to write all names of persons and places so that they .^cannot 
be misunderstood, to write on only one side of the paper, to enclose a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope, and ten cents in stamps for each query. Those who are subscribers 
will be given preference in the insertion of their queries and they will be inserted in the 
order in which they are received. All matters relating to this department must be sent 
to The Connecticut Magazine, Hartford, marked Genealogical Department. Give 
full name and post office address. 

It is optional with querist to have name and address or initials published. 



ANSWERS. 

To No. 8, (a) Jan'y, 1900. — Deacon 
Eleazer^ Gary, Windham, Conn., had a 
daughter Lydia who married David Rip- 
ley — probably born at Bristol. He was 
son of John^ Gary of Bridgewater, Mass., 
and his wife Abigail Allen, dau. of Samuel 
— John,i father of John,^ settled in Dux- 
bury in 1637, aged 25. (Note from 
William L. Weaver's Papers.) 

Ellen D. Larned, 

Thompson, Gonn. 

QUERIES. 

18. Case — Montague — Jacob Gase m. 
Sally H. Montague, Jan. i, 1806; 
resided in Gases' Farms, Gonn., 1856. 
Ghildren, Emeline ; Sarah Ann, m. Dr. 
John G. Howe ; Mary Ann, m. Whitney 
Wadsworth ; Juliette E. m. Amos G. 
Tuttle ; Susan M. m. James F. G. An- 
drews ; Lucia D. m. Luke S. West ; 
Jacob B. m. Julia Stannard ; Theodore 
D. m. Elvira Whiting; Emily S. m. 
William Weeks. Would like to hear 



from any descendants of the above. 
G. V. Gase, 

Ashtabula, Ohio. 

19. (a) Kennedy. — John Kennedy was 
born Feb. i, 1767 at Voluntown, Gonn. 
Who were his parents, brothers and 
sisters and dates of parents births and 
deaths. Was his father a Revolutionary 
soldier ? 

(b) Barns. — Anna Barns was born 
April 28, 1775 ^t WiUiamstown, Mass., 
and married above named John 
Kennedy. Want date of marriage and 
names and dates of her ancestors. 
Were any of them Revolutionary 
soldiers ? 

Burdett Hall, 

Ghittenango, N. Y. 

20. Dix. — Wanted the ancestry of 
Deborah Dix and the full name of her 
husband. They lived in Hartford and 
had two sons there, John and William. 
John is said to have married Mary 
Birdwell. Another son Leonard, born 



190 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT, 



191. 



in 1645 and died Dec. 7, 1697, lived in 

Wethersfield. He married Sarah , 

and had John, Samuel, Mercy, Hannah 
and Elizabeth. Deborah Dix also 
married Richard Barnes of Marlboro, 
Mass., Oct. 16, 1667, and died in 
Watertown, Mass. j. le b. w. 

2 1 . Averill—Stacy — Abigail Averill born 
May 28, 1762, Westford, Conn.; 
married at Palmer, Mass., June i, 
1780, to Isaac Stacy of Sturbridge* 
Mass. Wanted the names of her 
parents and grandparents with dates of 
their births, marriages and deaths. 
Also names of her brothers and sisters. 

w. p. s. 

22. (a) Nichols. — Gideon Nichols and 
his wife Abigail lived in Woodbury, 
and both died of New Milford fever in 
November, 181 2. What were the 
names of Gideon's parents and 
Abigail's, and where did they live ? 

(b) Camp — Eleazer Camp born in 
Milford in 1697, died 1774, and in- 
terred at Durham. His wife Mary was 
interred at Durham, 1776. Who were 
her parents? 

(c) Griswold — Mercy Griswold mar- 
ried Silas Crane in Durham, 1729. Her 
father's name was Samuel. Who was 
Samuel's father and who was Samuel's 
wife? 

(d) Perry. — Elizabeth Perry married 
Daniel Hill in Woodbury in 1758. Her 
father and grandfather were both 
named Daniel. Who were the wives of 
these two Daniels ? 

(e) Trowbridge. — James Trowbridge 
of New Haven, 1664-1732, married 
Mary Belden, 1698. What were her 
parents' names ? Their son, John 
Trowbridge, 1 709-1777, married Mary 
Comstock. What were names of her 
parents ? 



(f) Chapman. — Martha Chapman- 
1 714-1780, married Samuel French of 
Derby in 1733. What were her par- 
ents' names? c. b. h. 

23. Brown — Wanted, the names of an- 
cestors and places of birth, life and 
death of Abraham Brown, and of 
Abigail, his wife, and date and place of 
their marriage, her maiden name, etc. 
They lived in Coventry, Windham 
County, Conn. Had sons born there : 
Benjamin, Sept. 16, 1740; James, 
April 25, 1743 ; Elisha, April 14, 1745 ; 
Stephen, March 9, 1749 ; and Edmund, 
date of birth unknown, who settled in 
Norfolk, Conn. ; married Anna Burr, 
May 9, 1764; died 1809. Had no 
children. e. b. 

24. (a) Smith — Solomon Smith, doc- 
tor and deacon, died in Hartford, 
April 21, 1786, aged 52 years. His 
wife was Anna, daughter of Lieutenant 
John Talcott. In his youth he was 
apprenticed to Dr. Lothrop of Nor- 
wich. His ancestry is desired. Will 
give $3 for the information? 

(b) Hale. — Parentage and marriage of 
Elisha Hale (or Hall). He died in 
Farmington, New Cambridge parish, in 
1770, leaving widow Sylvia and chil- 
dren Curtis and Samuel (of age) ; and 
Phebe, Eunice, Freelove and Elisha 
(minors). 

Katherine A. Prichard, 

Waterbury, Conn. 

25. Edson. — Timothy Edson, Sr., born at 
Bridgewater, Mass., 16S9 ' married 
Feb. 10, 1 7 19, Mary Alden, born at 
Bridgewater, Mass., April 10, 1699 
(dau. of Deacon Joseph Alden and 
Hannah Dunham). Timothy Edson, 
Sr., and his wife settled at Stafford, 
Conn. He died there about 1769. 



192 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



When did she die? They had a son, 
Timothy Edson, Jr., born about 1722 
at Stafford. Full dates of his birth, 
death, marriage and to whom, wanted. 
Were there children? Timothy Edson, 
3rd, born at Stafford, 1754 (?). Full 
date wanted. He married Susanna 
Orcutt, born 1758 (?) (dau. of Solo- 
mon Orcutt and Mary Rockwell). Full 
dates wanted. One dollar will be paid 
for above information. w. t. d. 

26. Doolittle, IiiUs, Richardson — Davis' 
history of Wallingford states on page 
733 that Moses Doolittle married first 
Ruth Hills and second Lydia Richard- 
son, March 23, 1720. On page 729, 
same book states that Moses Doolittle 
married Ruth Richardson. Can any- 
one tell which is correct? We find 
that a Ruth Hills married a Richard- 
son and they had a Lydia. Could this 
be the Lydia who married Moses 
Doolittle? p. H. M. 

27. Clinton. — Wanted, ancestry with 
dates of Shubael Clinton, Sr. He had 



six children (perhaps more), viz.: 
Elizabeth, Mercy, Mary, Shubael, Jr., 
Margaret and Henry. These were all 
baptized with their father, Shubael, Sr., 
in Episcopal church. West Haven, 
Conn., 1734. Ehzabeth married Eli- 
phalet Stevens, New Haven, .1737. 
Margaret married Joseph Stilson of 
Milford, Nov. 20, 1749. I would hke 
the address of any of the descendants 
of above-named children of Shubael 
Clinton, Sr. O. P. Clinton, 

Waukesha, Wis. 

28. Robinson — Francis — Elias Robin- 
son married Fanny Francis about 1806 
or 1808. When were they married? 
They lived in Mansfield, Windham 
County, Conn. S. S. Robinson, 

Metamora, IlL 



29. Cook.—^2.n\ ancestry and birth- 
place of Hezekiah Cook, who died in 
New Marlboro, Mass., 1793, aged 64. 

L. A. c. 





EDITORIAL NOTES. 



Hon. Henry Cor- 
HON. nelius Robinson, 

HENRY c. ROBINSON. LL. D., whosc death 
took place in Hart- 
ford, his native city, on the 14th of Feb- 
ruary, held a most enviable place in the 
esteem, not only of his fellow-townsmen 
but of the people of the whole State. 
He was twice nominated for governor on 
the Republican ticket, and only failed of 
election in each instance by the narrowest 
margin. He was elected mayor of Hart- 
ford while that city was strongly demo- 
cratic. He held many offices of import- 
ance and responsibihty, was a thorough 
Christian, a great lawyer, and a broad- 
minded man in everythinf; that ministered 
to the needs of an active and useful life. 
In all respects he was one of the most 
finished examples of a civic ideal that 
the State has produced. 

There is something exceedingly satis- 
factory in contemplating the life and 
work of Henry C. Robinson. Viewed 
from the standpoint of non-personal 
feeling — the absence of intimate acquain- 
tance and friendship — it is of all the 
more value to observe this estimate of 
Mr. Robinson's character. There is a 
completeness, a genuine manliness — the 
true ring that touches both stranger and 



friend alike, that breathes in every act of 
Mr. Robinson's career, so that we who 
stand uncovered by his grave would fain 
dry our tears and cheer the soldier of 
civic hfe for the good that he has done 
and for the splendid example he has 
bequeathed us. 

Mr. Robinson's long life has been 
through scenes of varied interest and of 
far-reaching influence. He was at once 
the stern man of affairs, the statesman, 
the lawyer, the civic governor and the 
director of great business interests; then 
the warm man of culture, the patron of 
the arts and sciences, the educator, the 
bookman and the lover of the fields and 
woods — a sunny, happy and well-rounded 
nature, commanding the admiration and 
respect of thousands of his fellow-citizens 
of all shades of opinion and of all cir- 
cumstances in life. Mr. Robinson was a 
man of wide sympathies ; and in loyalty 
to his city, his State and his country he 
stood second to none. He was an 
approachable man : ever ready to unbend 
and hold out the hand of affectionate 
regard to the young, he was to those who 
had the great good fortune to know him 
a second father, kind, solicitous and ever 
willing to aid with hand, heart and mind. 
He was indeed theic ideal of what a man 
should be. Toward those of his own age, 



193 



194 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



his classmates of the High School and of 
Yale, his business associates and his 
friends, he was warm and almost youthful 
in the exuberance of his manifestations of 
friendship. It is the example of such 
lives as this that steadies the hearts of 
those who strive for high ideals. 



It will be difficult 
MISS for the people of 

SARAH PORTER. Farmington to realize 

that Miss Sarah Porter, 

their noted townswoman, has passed 

away. Her death took place on the 17th 

of February. 

Miss Porter died in the completeness 
of a ripe old age, full of the honors of a 
long and useful career spent in beautiful 
and historic old Farmington, her native 
town. She died in the house in which 
she was born eighty-seven years ago. 

One of the pleasantest features of Miss 
Porter's work was her adherence to old 
traditions in the education of young 
women, and the strenuous manner in 
which she opposed innovations, the 
'' catching " devices that seem to be in 
vogue in the education of girls in many 
other institutions. Miss Porter might 
have enlarged her school and dubbed it a 
college, but she did not. It was simply 
"■ Miss Porter's School for Young Ladies," 
and, if we mistake not, it will be so 
known for many years to come. Miss 
Porter insisted upon gentle womanliness 
with high-bred and unconscious reserve 
as the prime feature of her school life. 
But let no one think for a moment that 
her pupils were delicate lilies and pale 
little violets ready to droop and faint at 
the slighest shock to their nerves. Any 
one who has ridden on the cars of the 
Suburban line between Hartford and 
Farmington when a bevy of Miss Porter's 
pupils was en route must have noticed 



with unbounded admiration the magnifi- 
cent array of budding womanhood which 
they presented. Rosy-cheeked, clear- 
eyed, alert, brimful of the gayest of ani- 
mal spirits, yet withal always holding 
themselves within the lines of ladylike 
reserve : such are the girls of Miss Por- 
ter's School. 

Perhaps the very best evidence we have 
of the great value of Miss Porter's work 
as a teacher is the fact that many of her 
former pupils have sent their daughters to 
her to be educated. 

Miss Porter exercised a very great in- 
fluence in the community in which she 
lived, and her death will be keenly felt by 
all her fellow townsmen as a personal loss, 
while all over the country many homes 
will mourn sincerely and sadly the dear 
old teacher, to whose fine manners and 
gentleness they owe so much. 



* 



For a year The Con- 
A BI-MONTHLY necticut Magazine has 
MAGAZINE. been published as a 
monthly. The experi- 
ment has shown us that, in an historical 
publication of just this kind, we cannot 
do so well by our subscribers by offering 
them a single number every month as by 
offering them a double number once in 
two months. In bi-monthly form we can 
furnish more accurate historical matter, 
a greater variety of papers, and better and 
fuller illustrations. We receive from many 
sources valuable articles that are too long 
for the space allowed in the usual size of 
a monthly, and most of these are of such 
a nature that they cannot advantageously 
be divided in order that they may appear 
in two successive issues. 

The whole difficulty is obviated by 
printing a double number once in two 
months, — hence the bi-monthly is clearly 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



195 



the form that best meets the needs of the 
situation. By this means we shall be en- 
abled to produce, what we hope and pro- 
pose to produce, a magazine which shall 
become a household word in the homes 
of Connecticut. 



AN APPEAL 



TO REASON. 



It is the rule of this 
office that no notice 
shall be taken of an- 
nonymous communica- 
tions, but there are occasions when un- 
usual conditions exist that make it 
necessary to abrogate this rule. Such a 
condition confronts us in the present 
instance. 

Within a few days past the editor of 
this magazine has had addressed to him a 
package of printed pamphlets post-marked 
Rockville, Conn. Nothing was written to 
show who the sender was. One of these 
pamphlets bore the title, ^'An Appeal to 
Truth," being an adverse criticism of Prof. 
W. O. Atwater's contention that alcohol 
should be classed as a food, and not as a 
poison, as it is now designated in various 
educational text books. 

The evident object in sending us these 
papers was to show the sender's objection 
to our editorial on the subject in our last 
issue. Now our unknown correspondent 
should not have feared to disclose his or 
her identity, — a wholly unnecessary fear, 
as we shall presently show. 

The Connecticut Magazine registers 
here a condemnation as sweeping, it is 
hoped, as it is sincere against the use of 
alcohol as a beverage. We consider it a 
dangerous (we are not prepared to say 
poisonous) substance and should be taken, 
if at all, in medical doses and generally by 
the advice of a physician. We would 
abolish the saloon, but in the present 
state of society we will waste no energy in 
ihat direction. What we are ready to do, 



and do with all the earnestness that is in 
our power, is to join hands with scientists 
and educators in spreading the theory and 
practice of ethical firmness, and appeal to 
reason rather than to sentiment, to virtue 
rather than to innocence, in dealing with 
the question of intoxication. We would 
go back to first causes, to the lack of moral 
stamina, and seek to remedy that condi- 
tion by taking the bandage of ignorance 
from the eyes of the young and pliable, 
by pounding into every nook and 
cranny of their beings a full conception of 
the folly and hopelessness of the great 
evils that seek their ruin, and by teaching 
them how to avoid these evils. It may 
seem like presumption to suggest the dis- 
solution of the present society of the 
Woman's Christian Temperance Union, 
and have its reorganization along new 
lines, endeavoring, as its main object, to 
look more thoroughly after the embryo 
candidates for the bar-room, and to seek a 
remedy swift and sure. But that is what 
we do suggest. No journal in the land is 
more alive than is the Connecticut Maga- 
zine to the horrors, the unspeakable de- 
gradation, the wallowing in the stench and 
nastiness of besotted beastliness, the in- 
humanity to self, the no less inhumanity to 
those we hold most dear — mother, father, 
wife, children, — that is embraced in that 
one word drunkenness. Bah ! the mere 
thought of it occasions feelings of rage and 
disgust that such an anomalous condition 
should be, that the world of reason and 
logic should be so impotent to stem the 
plunge to so sorrowful an end. We know 
full well the startling record of the cen- 
turies of drunkenness with all its monstrous 
tribute to shame, its connection with all 
that is despicable and infamous, its spirit 
of meanness of every description, — whether 
it be in palace or in hovel, among the well- 
born or the grovelling non-descript of the 
slums, — an unctious democracy of weak- 



196 



EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT. 



ness, folly and brutality that surpasses 
belief. 

How often in the stillness of the night, 
in cold, in darkness and in want, do we 
not hear that agonizing cry of despair of 
starved, broken-hearted mothers, wives and 
children, who supplicate with dying gasps, 
" My God ! my God ! why hast Thou for- 
saken us ! " 

The editor trusts that his unknown 
Rockville correspondent will take fresh 
heart and will acknowledge that because 
the Connecticut Magazine elects to 
appeal to reason in dealing with the 
question of the status of alcohol, it 
was a gratuitous proceeding to ask him to 
consider an " Appeal to Truth," and other 
sentimental campaign literature of total 
abstinence. For two thousand years, nay 
more, sentiment has waged a hopeless 
war against alcohol and failed to make 
more than a passing impression on each 
epoch. Now let reason and science deal 
with the matter. 

As we took occasion to say in our last 
issue, it is to the cultivation on a more 
extensive scale of applied ethics and 
scientific common-sense, to a condition 
that considers and removes the causes 
that give us weak natures and that takes 
away the pitfalls of the wild recklessness 
of our social status of to-day; it is in 
scientific common sense, solid learning 
and rock-ribbed virtue, not in ignorant 
fears and tender innocence, that we must 
place our hope for the future of our kind. 



SCENIC HIGHWAY Professor John D. 

THROUGH Quackenbos, profes- 

NEw ENGLAND. sor cmcritus of rhe- 

toric in Columbia 
University, Colonel 
John Hay, Secretary of State, and a num- 
ber of New York capitalists have under 
consideration the plan of a great scenic 



highway for automobiles through the 
most picturesque portions of the New 
England mountains. The names of those 
who are most directly interested are a 
guarantee that the propot-ed plan will be 
carried out to a successful issue. It is a. 
magnificent conception in that it will 
afford to the rich and the poor alike the 
means of coming into closer touch with 
out-door life. The modest cyclist and 
the wealthy automobilist will find equal 
pleasure in the road and all will vie with 
each other in heaping encomiums upon 
the man who conceived the brilhant idea. 
Let the good work go on. When the 
route is chosen and a copy of the map is 
furnished us, as is promised, we will re- 
produce it in our first issue after its 
receipt and will follow that up with 
photographs showing points of interest 
through which the line passes in this 
state. 



WOMEN FOR Women for druggists' 

DRUG CLERKS. assistants? And why 
not? From time to 
time we hear of young 
women who are proving to be capable 
drug clerks and the first thought that 
occurs to us is, why do not more women 
engage in the work? It would seem a 
measure of great stabihty to the retail 
drug trade if the custom of employing 
women were to obtain a wider observance. 
It has been one of the greatest drawbacks 
of the dmggist's business that when he 
secures a bright and capable man to 
assist him, this man will eventually, in 
nine cases out of ten, go into business, 
for himself and make the most of the 
information he has secured while an 
employee, to the detriment of his former 
employers' interest. Now, women are 
by nature less venturesome than men 
and, besides, their wants are more mod- 



EDITORIAL DEPARTMENT. 



197 



erate and they will be satisfied to remain 
at a smaller remuneration than is paid to 
men. Men marry, have families and re- 
quire increasing salaries, which, if not 
granted, forces them to go into business 
on their own account, thus adding to an 
already large number of establishments, 
augmenting by just so much the com- 
pethion in the trade and contributing to 
the poverty if not to the failure of many 
concerns. Should women clerks marry, 
their places can be filled easily enough 
from the vast army of bright college 
girls, now without adequate means of 
support that are commensurate to their 
energy and inteUigence. 

It would seem that the business of 
compounding prescriptions is one of the 
greatest dignity, for here life itself is at 
stake and quickness and efficiency are 
what is needed; and these qualities, it 
would appear, are pre-eminently a 
woman's. The one serious obstacle to 
women engaging in the drug business is 
that the hours of service are long and 
exacting, but this condition, we have no 
doubt, can be met in a manner satisfac- 
tory to the requirements of the business. 
If women drug clerks marry they will 
carry into their homes a knowledge of 
medicine that will prove of inestimable 
value in emergencies that are bound to 
occur in every family at one time or 
another. This makes it doubly advan- 
tageous to have women learn the business 
of a druggist. The same thing cannot be 
said of men. It is an even chance that 
they will be absent from home attending 
to their work at the time when their ser- 
vices will be most needed. 



It would seem then that the interest of 
the drug trade would be best conserved 
by employing women in the prescription 
department — and in other departments 
for that matter, — and that the public 
interest, too, would be better taken care 
of, if women had this a field in which to 
work. The majority of the patrons of 
drug stores are women, we believe, and it 
seems to us that it would be graceful and 
appropriate to have women clerks at hand 
to receive their orders. We hear of many 
of our brighest and most enthusiastic 
young women electing to following the 
profession of a trained nurse, a work that 
is certainly more exacting and more 
nerve-racking than the work behind the 
drug counter. Protests from the host of 
worthy young men now in our different 
colleges of pharmacy are not in order and 
none will be forthcoming we venture to 
assert, for all recognize that our sisters 
must have the right of way in the effort 
for a living. 



Beginning with the present issue. The 
Connecticut Magazine introduces a de- 
partment of Floriculture, to be edited by 
the Rev. Magee Pratt, who is qualified by 
practical experience to speak with force 
upon his subject. His happy manner of 
treating his theme must awaken the livliest 
enthusiasm among all lovers of flowers 
and should do much to incite others to 
acknowledge the indispensable part these 
beautiful things in nature play in our 
lives, and to cultivate them accordingly. 



BOOK NOTES AND REVIEWS. 



GOVERNOR William Bradford 
AND His Son, Major William 
Bradford, by James Shepard, is the 
title of a book which has come to us too 
late, we regret to say, for thorough 
review. 

This is an age of specialism and accu- 
racy, and in his work Mr. Shepard has 
fully lived up to the require;iients. He 
has held himself rigidly to the subject in 
hand and has cited his authorities in the 
most conscientious and thorough mannar. 
The book shows a very large amount of 
the most careful research and cannot fail 
to be of the greatest value to all students 
of colonial history. 

This book, which is printed by the 
Herald Press of New Britain, is attrac- 
tively bound and well illustrated. The 
paper and type are excellent, and the 
accuracy of the paragraphing and the 
clearness of the marginal references 
deserve especial commendation. The 
price by mail, postpaid, is ^2.10. 



" Observations," by Radcliff Hicks, is 
the title of an exceedingly interesting 
book just issued by the Knickerbocker 
Press. As its title indicates it is a record 
of observations jotted down by a wide 
awake and observant traveler. A man 
who has crossed the ocean forty times, as 
Mr. Hicks has done, must have stored up 
a great fund of valuable information. 
This is evident in the work before us. 
Hardly a leaf is turned but we are treated 
to something new and interesting, and it 
is all told in the concise and agreeable 
manner of a series of letters. The 
printing, the quality of the paper and the 
binding are of the best, the title being 
stamped in gold ; altogether a very attrac- 
tive and readable book. Pp. 251 ; price, 



.75. Belknap & Warfield, Hartford, 
Conn. 



The Brothers of the Book, of Gouve- 
neur, N. Y., have issued in a rich and 
dainty form a volume of verse having the 
title " One Hundred Quatrains from the 

Rubaiyat of Omar Khayyam," a render- 
ing in English verse by Elizabeth Alden 
Curtis, with an introduction by Richard 
Burton. 

Perhaps the greatest charm of this lat- 
est interpretation of Fitzgerald's Omar 
Khayyam is the exquisite touch of a 
woman's art that breathes in every line of 
this brilUant contribution to Hterature. 
Miss Curtis' words are words of feminine 
grace and innocent abandon, rather than 
of masculine ruggedness and daring. All 
lovers of naturalness will hope that she 
will continue to write as she has begun, 
and prove, as her great prototype, George 
Eliot, has done along different lines, that 
the dictum of sex is a fundamental 
quality in sustained psychological effort, 
and that the more intense the emotion 
expressed the greater is the deviation of 
sex in style ; and in degree as this quality 
is acknowledged and adhered to, the \ 
more permanent is the character of the 
author's work. No woman has yet writ- 
ten like a man who has lived much 
beyond the limits of her own life ; no 
man has attempted to trace the intricate 
windings of a woman's emotions, from 
the standpoint of a woman, but has failed 
signally of his object. Miss Curtis is 
yet hardly out of her teens, and has, 
therefore, before her a long and most 
promising career in the world of letters. 

A limited number of copies of the 
work can be had of Mr. Lawrence C. 
Woodworth, Scrivener to the Brothers of 
the Book, Gouveneur, N. Y. ; price $1. 



FLORICULTURE. 



We'l make you as welcome as the flowers in May. 



BY REV. MAGEE PRATT. 



OLD friends, old books and old 
flowers make a trinity that is un- 
matched in earthly combinations, and the 
degree in which they are appreciated is 
the measure of personal culture and de- 
velopment. A bad man may love them 
all, but the man that does love them is 
not all bad, — his affections are redeeming 
elements in his nature and each of them 
are strong moral agencies working to- 
wards the perfection of character and 
life. 

I have been asked to write about 
flowers, and I have consented for this 
reason : I owe them a great debt. I am 
an indolent man who must always be 
doing something and I can do a great 
deal among the flowers and cheat myself 
with the idea that I am playnig or resting 
all the while. I am fond of beautiful 
things, and as opals and diamonds and 
Turner landscapes are out of my reach I 
have gone to the flowers in my quest for 
beauty and among them found more of it 
than gems or painted landscapes ever 
knew. There I find a large measure of 
holiday to a small measure of toil, the 
right proportion to make a contented life. 
When I have a flower garden I am able to 
dilute my steady work with a daily vaca- 
tion, and by the help the flowers give make 
every day a true holiday, or holy-day, as 
all rest days should be. 



So if the readers of the magazine will 
bear with me I will talk to them once, a 
month about their gardens. But I must 
mix up my advice with my meditations- 
give so much science and so much philos- 
ophy. I hate a garden with a fence, and 
straight walks and carpet bedding abom- 
inations. A bed of roses is not only sweet 
to look at, but a good place to dream by, 
and if I tell you how to grow the roses 
for your benefit you must let me slip in a 
dream now and then for my own. I 
should like you to make your gardens 
just as I make mine. 

The nearest approach to perfection is 
the well-grown flower : given a rose in its 
splendor, or a lily in its purity, and the 
eyes gloat on it, and the heart rests on its 
glory with an emotion that is almost 
absolute content. 

If you want a bed of roses this year and 
buy those that were taken from the 
ground last fall and are dormant now, as 
nearly all the Hybrid roses are, this is 
the best thing to do : make a fresh bed of 
new ground. A rose has too much 
dignity to grow properly in worn-out 
earth ; it's an insult to the Queen of 
Flowers to put her there and she resents 
it by mildew and imperfect buds. Into 
your bed dig, and dig deep, some good 
fertilizer, barnyard is the best of all, then 
take your plants and trim them down in 



199 



200 



FLORICULTURE. 



the stems to two good eyes, leaving only 
about 6 inches for growth. Do not be 
afraid of cutting too short ; the less stem, 
if it has an eye on it, the better the 
flowers. Plant them deep right up 
to the crown of the plant, then tramp 
them down firm and hard ; make 
them solid in the ground and leave them 
alone. Don't water till they grow, or 
they may not, though they surely will, 
especially if you do this to them ; when 
you bring them home, if they are dry and 
hard looking, dig a shallow trench about 
six inches deep in some sunny place and 
bury them altogether, root and branch, 
for about three days, and then plant them 
properly. That interment softens the 
cellular structure of the stem so that the 
sap can circulate and make it easy for 
them to start. Plant Gabrielle Luizet 
and Baroness Rothchild, Captain Hay- 
ward and Clio. You may have Jacqui- 
minot if you like, but you should like 
Ulrich Bruner it's a perfect lady rose 
without a thorn, and, oh so sweet ! And 
I like Magna Charter, and Mabel Morri- 
son, but then, I like all of them. What- 
ever you do, get a Crimson Rambler, and 
treat well ; give rich earth and deep, full 
sunshine and something to cling to and 
you will have in a year or two the finest 
floral sight to be seen in all the land. 

The climber that should be in every 
garden for blossoms in the fall is the Jap- 
anese Clematis Paniculata. Plant in the 
spring, and with good treatment as to soil 
and position it will grow anywhere, even 
in a large flower pot. It will cover any 
old roof or shabby porch with a mantle of 
white, fleecy, downy lovHness that nothing 
can equal that I know of in all the world 
of flowers. The new Japanese Morning 
Glories ought to be more popular than 
they are. You can grow them from seed, 
but like corn and hma beans, they must 
be kept out of the earth until it is warm 



hearted enough to treat them well. Aljout 
the middle of May is early enough to sow, 
and then how they grow ! and to those 
who have only seen the old Morning 
Glory, what revelations they make about 
the secrets of beauty that are hidden away 
in all the common flowers, just waiting 
until men are wise enough to treat them 
properly to do their best. The new are 
only the outgrowth of the old, but they 
have taught me many a lesson of patience 
when I have said of some old spoilt human 
things that they were so bad they were 
not worth working or caring for. 

Remember that you cannot grow any- 
thing properly without labor. The first 
thing is to dig deep, as the flower sends 
its roots a long way down to find what it 
wants. 

I like a lustrous, shining bed of flowers, 
and an old English weed makes about as 
gorgeous a sight as any I know. The Rev. 
Walter Shirley reformed the weed and took 
all the black blood out of it, and sent it 
out into the world a really respectable 
character. If you have a poor soil it will 
not prevent it doing its best. It is easy 
to grow. Rake the surface and scatter 
thinly the seed of the Shirley Poppy on it, 
and then all you have to do is to see that 
no weeds that are not reformed, smother 
the plants, and when they bloom and the 
sun shines on them you will have an ex- 
hibition of sparkling, flashing color that 
will make Tiffany's diamonds look like 
Brummagen jewels. 

For tender delicate color, for general 
usefulness (either for personal adornment 
or house decoration) for subtle perfume, 
for ease of culture, for a combination of 
qualities that exist in few other flowers, 
choose the sweet pea. Give it new ground 
if you can. It is everybody's flower, and 
I only mention it to say one or two nec- 
essary things for the amateur. Get Eng- 
lish-grown seed it you can. It has more 



FLORICULTURE, 



20 1 



vitality. And never mind the catalogues ; 
buy only about twenty sorts if you have a 
large garden, and the best mixture if a 
small one. There are about one hundred 
and eighty varieties grown, but twenty- 
four will cover the whole field of color 
getting the best specimens of each, the im- 
proved varities of Countess of Radnor, 
Salopian, Lovely, Sadie Burpee, Mrs. 
Chamberlin, Boratton, Countess of Powis 
and Queen Victoria are among the best, 
but all are good in my eyes. 

The best council I can give about gen- 
eral principles for the garden is this : Sel- 
ect flowers that harmonize with the length 
and breadth of your ground. Cannas and 
hollyhocks and caladiums are out of place 
in a small plot. If you are limited in 
space select those plants that have real 
artistic qualities of foliage and flower and 
that will bear close inspection. If you 
have lots of room reproduce the most 
glowing showy flower effect I saw last 
year in a friend's garden in Wethersfield. 
A longjow of perhaps 75 feet of Rudbeckia 
Laciniata, Golden Glow, formed the back- 
ground. They need support, and two 
rows are best. They grow six feet high 
and in August and September were one 
hugh wave of brilliant gold, xnasses of in- 
comparable wealth of flower. In front 
were planted Cannas and Caladium Escu- 
lentum ; the Cannas in mass and broken 
about every 12 feet by the Caladiums. 
For a large, massive, soul-filling satisfac- 
tion it was about the best I had in all the 
year. 

There is another flower that will excite 
surprise and admiration wherever grown. 



and hardly anybody knows it either, but I 
found it quite easy of culture, and so will 
others if they go about it the right way. 
Dig a piece of light land and in early 
May sow three seeds 3 feet apart. If 
they grow, well and. good ; if they do not, 
plant three more two weeks later. The 
earth must be warm. The early planting 
is to gain time and is worth risking. Put 
the seed about one-fourth inch deep and 
cover at night with a glass or pan to pre- 
vent the cool night check. It grows 
about 4 feet high, and is very beautiful. 
The common name is the Glory Pea ; the 
botanical, Clianthus Dampieri, a native 
Australian flower. But those who grow it 
are sure of visitors when it blooms. 

There is no piece of furniture designed 
for the use of flower lovers in parlor or 
conservatory that I have seen equal to 
the Queen Flower Stand. Being adjusta- 
ble it is as good as three stands in one, 
and can be converted into a small table 
for cut flowers, while it is so decorative 
that the idea of its utility is lost in its 
beauty. 

As I write the snow is yet on the 
ground, but the flowers are nearly ready 
for us. Old Mother Nature in her loom 
of earth, with warp of ice and woof of 
snow is weaving for the spring garments 
of green and gold and sapphire. Crocus 
and tulip, hyacinth and daffodil are only 
waiting the bidding of the sun and the 
welcome of the birds. And soon the 
earth will don its robes of verdant, 
jewelled life and call us all to worship in 
the new world wherein dwelleth beauty 
and righteousness. 





THE HOME. 



THE CHARM OF HOSPITALITY. 



BY LOUISE W. BUNCE. 



Any inquiries regarding these subjects, or requests for receipts, addressed to The Connecticut 
Magazine, will gladly be answered through these columns. 



IN this paper let us for a little while 
leave the kitchen for the parlor, to 
speak of the charm of hospitality. 

The writer had the pleasure one sum- 
mer of calling at a country house, with 
the most unusual and delightful experi- 
ences from first to last, and a rehearsal of 
them I hope may in some measure con- 
vey the charm of the situation as it was 
unfolded to her. Upon ringing the bell 
I had but a moment to wait before a neat 
white-capped maid threw the door wide 
open. This was an invitation in itself in 
great contrast to having the door opened 
a crack, as if to guard against intruders, 
by a woman who if she has the credit of 
being neat will almost always be holding 
the neck of her gown together in default 
of the missing hook. 

I inquired if Mrs. W — was at home 
and the maid, taking my card and reply- 
ing that she would see, conducted me to 
a perfectly kept parlor, asked me to 



be seated, handed me a little brochure (it 
happened to be one of Elbert Hubbard's 
"Little Journeys") and noiselessly dis- 
appeared. This courtesy gave me such a 
feeling of hospitality and surrounded me 
instantly with such an air of refinement 
that I had hardly realized it and given a 
cursory glance at the pamphlet in my 
hand when the maid re-appeared to say 
that her mistress was at home and would 
join me in a moment. 

Our conversation immediately following 
the entrance of my hostess turned upon 
literature, art, music and the news of the 
day ; and the time sped most uncon- 
sciously. All too soon, and quite reluc- 
tantly I took my departure, said good 
afternoon at the reception room door and 
stepping toward the front door perceived 
the maid advancing down the hall to 
open it for me. As, upon my entrance, 
she again threw it wide open, and held it 
so till I had gone down the steps. 



202 



THE HOME, 



205 



Finally on the pavement I drew a long 
sigh of satisfaction, exclaiming to myself, 
'^ How perfectly delicious !" 

Shouldn't we women profit by this 
example, and even though we may not 
have a retinue of servants to carry out an 
elaborate attendance, cannot we at least 
show our friends the charm ? 

Mr. Gregory says charm may be 
explained negatively, it being easier to tell 
what it is not made of than what it is, and 
certainly we would not have charm obtru- 
sive ; but I am sure if we followed the 
example of my friend we should find little 
or no time for the discussion of clothes 
or servants — two topics of vital interest 
to women, of course, but better kept in 
the closet with the medicine chest than 
paraded in the reception room. The life 
of a housekeeper so naturally and easily 
falls into a rut that the discussions of home 
topics can bring little refreshment to the 
mind. When our affairs are arranged let 
us turn to outside matters. 

What one of the gentlemen of our 
homes upon leaving his office in the after- 
noon and meeting with a friend opens a 
conversation anent the employees in his 
business or the dust on the office floor? 
Rather they talk of mutual »>utside in- 
terests and it is a pleasure for them to 
meet. Let us at least be as broad-minded 
as our men. Our task will not be a diffi- 
cult one, for every woman living has a 
glow of the artistic in her which a little 
breeze will fan. 

Then, of course, tact, for we are going 
a little far afield, plays an undisputed part 
I in the charm of hospitality. 

A woman calls upon another from 
either a sense of duty or because she has 
something to say ; in tlie first instance 
the conversation will probably not go 
beyond the weather, but in the second 
place, dear hostess, show yourself a good 
listener and your visitor at departing will 



involuntarily say, '* What a charming 
woman." One of the happiest hostesses 
I ever knew had the faculty of apparently 
always listening, with a word now and 
then, until there came a pause in the con- 
versation of her company when she 
seemed always to have something to say 
worth listening to. While she talked to 
you she gave you the impression that she 
had chosen to and that you were really 
the only person worth talking to in the 
whole world. 

Carried beyond the point of discretion 
this might become empty flattery, but 
having tact as a basis it can be nothing 
but purest charm. 

Mme. Recamier, acknowledged artist 
in this home attribute, when asked where- 
in lay the secret power of her attraction, 
replied : " When I see a friend approach 
I exclaim, ^ En fin !' ; and when I see my 
friend depart, 'Deja !' " 

This leads me to say there should be no 
fluster about charm. What apologetic, 
self-accusing, self-excusing woman exerts 
charm? We feel when we go to her 
home that we have chosen an inoppor- 
tune time and that, as for her, after we've 
gone she will say, "Well, did you ever I" 
If we are truly hospitable we will make 
the best of any situation in which we mav 
find ourselves counting the pleasure of 
friendly intercourse as utterly discounting 
any negligences. We may wish it were 
different, but don't let us show it. 

Before leaving this alluring and inex- 
haustible subject let us linger a moment 
over the sweet morsel of the hospitalitv 
of charms. I must again quote, this 
time Mrs. Kendal, who when asked for 
whom, in her opinion, woman dressed 
well and appeared brilliant, her friends or 
her husband, replied : '' It depends alto- 
gether upon the woman." 

So we may wear our manners as our 
clothes, entirely according to the woman. 



204 



THE HOME, 



Do we realize quite enough that our hus- 
bands come home to be diverted, not 
teased wiih petty home annoyances and 
that they would enhance our charm did 
we but direct our forces for their enter- 
tainment? Why say au revoir to charm 
at the sound of a latch key and the 
entrance of the home element? The 
atmosphere of the honeymoon is the only 
Home Rule for woman to adopt, and why 
should it not be a perpetual honeymoon? 
Then a man, his business done, his club 
forgotten, would go home for an hour's 
diversion before dinner with his wife, 
instead of saying to himself. " Oh ! she 
doesn't want me now, and there'll be a 
lot of chattering, gossiping people at the 
house and I don't feel like talking to 
them." Understand, he must not go 



home from a sense of duty, but pleasure 
and madame must be there to greet hiai. 
I would not say never go out without her, 
or him, for any two persons living 
together daily draw down the reservoir of 
attractiveness, and this may only be 
re-filled by individual contact with the 
outside world when the ^' superior nine- 
tenths " is not about. 

I may not touch upon the child ele- 
ment as an attraction of home, for space 
will not admit of the discussion of so 
intricate a topic, except to call attention 
to the influence of such a home upon the 
infantile mind, and the infinite harmony 
of such at-one-ness each with every other. 

Let us fully exert both abroad and at 
home our hospitality and our charm. 
To be continued. 



ENTERTAINING. 



MARKETING. 



ECC»NOMY. 




UR markets contain at pres- 
ent a surfeit of eggs at a 
fractional price of that of 
the winter, thus placing a 
variety of delicious dishes 
within the reach of the 
moderate purse. I shall 
therefore devote a portion of this paper 
to egg and fish cookery, quoting one or 
two authorities. 

The fish list is still limited, salmon, 
trout and bass being the choice varieties, 
while mackerel, codfish, haddock, hali- 
but, bluefish, etc., are more reasonable in 
price. Bluefish is the most difficult of 
all varieties to get in perfection and 
should never be served really away from 
the sound of the ocean wave. 

A delicate luncheon dish is as follows : 
Cut slices of stale baker's bread an inch 
thick with a circular cooky-cutter ; with a 
smaller cutter take out a half-inch in 
thickness from the center of each form, 



leaving a shell like a pate case. Fry 
these to a light brown in butter, spread 
with hot tomato catsup and drop a 
poached egg into each cup-like hollow. 

Still another is an omelette soufflee. 
Whip the whites of six eggs to a very 
stiif froth, with a pinch of salt added ; 
beat to a cream the yolks of three eggs 
with three rounded tablespoonsful of 
sifted, powdered sugar. Add a table- 
spoonful of lemon juice, fold in the 
beaten whites lightly (do not stir) and 
turn the mixture into a buttered pudding 
dish. Sprinkle with sugar and bake in a 
very hot oven eight or ten minutes. 
Serve immediately and flavor with vanilla 
or orange, if preferred. 

A third variety is called Eggs Benedict. 
Broil a thin slice of cold-boiled ham cut 
the size of a small baker's loaf ; toast a 
slice of bread, butter it and moisten with 
a little water ; lay the ham on it and on 
that a poached egg. Serve individually. 



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Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



205 



THE HOME. 



A dessert in which eggs play a part is 
as follows: Prune Soufflee--Soak a half- 
pound of prunes in water till soft, drain, 
take out the stones and quarter them. 
Beat the yolks of four eggs with three 
tablespoons of powdered sugar ; add the 
prunes ; add a pinch of salt to the whites 
and beat them to a stiff froth ; stir these 
into the mixture of yolks and prunes 
very lightly ; turn into a buttered pud- 
ding dish, bake in a moderate oven 
twenty minutes and serve immediately. 

French cooks pay more attention to 
the sauces with which they dress their 
dishes than we do, and in this respect 
they have the advantage. Some varieties 
of food depend mainly for their excel- 
lence and relish upon their appropriate 
sauces and the lack of them renders the 
dish a failure. Eggs may here again play 
an important part both cooked as a com- 
pound part of a mixture, hard boiled first 
and stirred into a sauce and grated or 
chopped to serve as a garnish. The base 
of all sauces, exclusive of sweet sauces, 
is butter, flour and stock or milk, and the 
varieties are obtained by an infusion of 
vegetable flavoring, meat extracts and 
sometimes wine. A Hollandaise Sauce is 
especially good with all boiled fish. Rub 
two tablespoons of butter to a cream and 
add the beaten yolks of four eggs and the 
juice of half a lemon. Add slowly a 
cupful of hot water, put the saucepan 
containing the mixture into a vessel con- 
taining boiling water, and stir the mixture 
constantly till it thickens but do not let it 
boil, lest it should curdle. It should be 
the consistency of rich cream. 

This leads me to speak of some fish 
dishes which form so regular an item of 
diet during any season. An ex- 
cellent and appetizing breakfast dish is 
prepared by broiling smoked salmon. If 
the salmon is very salt it will be neces- 
sary to soak it in cold water over night, if 



not, this may be omitted. Put the fish in 
a saucepan of cold water and let it come 
to a boil slowly and boil five minutes, 
then drain and wipe it dry. Lay the fish 
on a broiler and toast it over a slow fire ; 
dish and dress it with butter. An addi- 
tion is a cream sauce poured over it, but 
this may or may not be used at discretion. 

The southern shad are now in market, 
and of the roe a toothsome luncheon dish 
may be made. Parboil the roe and 
mince it, adding a little cream to hold it 
together. Season with pepper and salt, 
make into croquettes and brown in the 
oven» Serve with a very rich butter sauce 
made of blended flour and water, and 
plenty of butter. Should be as rich as 
mayonnaise. 

As fish may serve the purpose of soup 
as well as piece de resistence I give a re- 
ceipt for a very declicious lobster bisque 
good for any time of year. 

Choose a lobster weighing two to two 
and a-half pounds. Remove the meat 
from the shell after boiling and cut it in 
small dice, grate the coral and add the 
last thing. For the body of the bisque 
take a quart of white stock — veal stock is 
the best — add a bay leaf, pieces of 
thyme, three stalks of parsley, two stalks 
of celery, two cloves and an onion ; let 
these cook slowly three-quarters of an 
hour; season with salt and pepper, a 
tablespoon or butter, and thicken with 
two tablespoons of blended flour ; strain 
and add a cup and a half of cream 
beaten to a froth and the lobster meat, 
and serve as soon as possible. 

Dishes for Convalescents. 

I turn now from the more solid food to 
some dishes for the convalescent, in 
answer to a request for some tasty dishes 
for sickly appetites. If these directions 
are faithfully followed I can answer for 
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24 and box of ointment $1.00, postpaid hy mail. Send for book 
of valuable information on Piles, FREE, whether you use our 
remedy or not. 

THE DAN1EI.S SURE PII.E CURE CO., 

284 Asylum St., Hartford, Conn. 

For One Dollar invested at any drug store 
in Dr. Grove's Herb Extract you can become 
proof against Grippe or Pneumonia. 

The same cures Malaria immediately. 



SI 00 Reward SI 00 

The readers of this paper will be pleased to learn that 
there is at least one dreaded disease that science has been 
able to cure in all its stages, and that is Catanh. HaU's 
Catarrh Cure is the only positive cure known to the medi- 
cal fraternity. Catarrh being a constitutional disease, re- 
quires a constitutional treatment. Hall's Catarrh Cure is 
taken internally, acting directly upon the blood and mucous 
surffices of the system, thereby destroying the foundation 
of the disease, and givmg the patient strength by building 
up the constitution and assisting nature in doing its work. 
The proprietors have so much faith in its curative powers, 
that they offer One Huudred Dollars for any case that it 
fails to cure. Send for 1 st of testimonials. 

Address, F. J. CHENEY & CO., Toledo, O. 
^^Sold by Druggists, 75c. 
Hall's Family Pills are the best. 



WANTED, in good condition, Trumbull's 
History of Connecticut, also Savage's Win- 
throp History. Write, giving price and 
condition. 

0. C. HILL, Bethlehem, Conn. 



TAN-PO. Japanese Incense 
a fragrant and healthful disin 
fectant for perfuminf rooms and 
clearing apartments of odors of 
cooking, dampness, etc., espe- 
ciallv usetul in the sick room. 
Send 10 cents ior complete box. KISMET PERFUME CO., 
Fort Lee, N. J. Mention Conn. Magazine when ordering. 

^■gll f ^ JLy B C d^ positively removed b> 
^^ K E. ■■ R i_ t rt "«i^g Stillman's Cream. 
^■■^VI'^iBa^^^ Prepared especially for 
~_ this great enemy of beauty. Write for particulars. 
^ILLDIAN FRECKLE (KKAill 00., Dept. 1,. AUKUKA, ILLS. 



Can Yon Do It? 
Number 10 Puzzle. 

The most fascinating 
and instructive puzzle 
ever put on the mar- 
ket. Sealed direc- 
tions with each. Sent 
to any address on 
receipt of 15c. 

Chas. B. Elmorb, Drawer 56, Hartford, Conn. 

y^ lifllfCCAND SEVEN PRISONS. 20r>pago,, llU.stratod with 

4I I ■■ I W P^ full ]"igO£iigr.iviii,.-v. ,M..st inlero<il.n|I hook publislwd. Prepaid 

t ■ WW ■ w ^^^,,„,. ^ (~ FINK CO., MN.OgdenSt., Buffnlo. N.Y. 

[>f HELL AND THE WAY OUT! Something you never 
thought of. Two Volumes. 25 cents silver. 

.^MEIirCAX SUPPLY, 5163 Dearborn St.. Pittsburg. Pa. 








oUnt r Ur POWDER 

is guaranteed to kill Cockroaches 
Water Bugs, etc. Prepaid to any 
address on receipt of 25 Cents. 

ADOLPH ISAACSEN & SOlf 

64 Fulton St., New York. 



1MT7\X7' TTT-TTlMr' ^^^ ^ ^^P'^ •''f^^^'" ^'^'* ^^e^ts, both 

INXiW X xrailNVJ sexes, is the Acme Eraser. A century 
ahead of any other ink eraser. Sells at sight to every pen 
and ink user and typewriter. $3 to S5 a day sure. Sample 
postpaid 25c, or stamp for circular. 

EUREKA NOVELTY CO. Dept. D. 

201 Gratiot Ave., Detroit, Mich. 



14 inches long, crowds in 
Chimney, fills space, polishes bright. Sample 10 cents. 1 doi. GOc, postpaid. 
3 doz. $1.00, or 12 doz. for t3 60 by exp .Agents make bi? pay. 111. Catalofut 
of Novelties.Tricks.Wigs & Plays free. C. E. M.\RSHALL,Mfr. ,Lockport,>'. Y. 



18 BEAUTIFUL 

PHOTO ENGRAVINGS 

IN TINTS. 

Illustrating the 32- 
page booklet "Ihe 
Lord's Prayer in the 
Sign Language." 
^\ ill interest young 
or old. Printed on 
finest quality coated 
paper. Postpaid to 
; ny add: ess, 1 5 cts. 

Conn. Maga2ine Co., 
Harlford. Conn. 



A SAVING WOKTU HAVING. 




no YOU PAIMT or do you wish to learn 
%^\^ ivrw i-i^irv ■ ^aijj^jjgp If so. send us 

2oc for a term of 10 lessons on our Endless Chain Plan. 
Where it has cost others $10.00 it now is given to you 
for 25 cents, Coin or Stamps. Address 

PEARL PORTRAIT CO., 

Box 433, Ogden, Utah. 



SUFFERERS from NERVOUS DISEASES 
,^ ^,-. Find this an 



Ideal Home. 




Cbc TaTittlngton Uallcv Sanaioiwii, fsSn"'"""*' 

The latest scieutitic and most approved methods art^ used. 

The large, handsome house is very cheexful. .-lirv, uewly 
fiirnishoil throuirhout; antt there are spacious ver«iuias on the 
first and second stories. The Farniinsrton River winds through 
the jrroiinds, and on all sides are beauty and quiet. The 
pure spring water is pleutit\il, and the air iiiviironuinj:. The 
drives in all directions are unsurpassed. Ketertnces tYi^m 
patients cured and other information will tte cheert'iill.v given, 
on request. Address, Dr, P. I». IVltier. Hartford. Conn 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



206 



THE HOME. 



Mutton Broth : Select the knuckle of 
a leg of mutton and a pound of lean 
meat. Have the bone cracked and the 
meat cut into dice ; put these in a sauce- 
pan with a quart of cold water, and cov- 
ering the saucepan closely boil slowly till 
the meat is in rags. Skin carefully after 
the first boiling. Remove the bone and 
tasteless pieces of meat, add a tablespoon 
of washed rice and boil till the rice is 
tender, season with salt, pepper and a 
little chopped parsley previously scalded 
by pouring hot water over it to remove 
the rank flavor. Serve with thin crackers 
toasted. 

Beef Tea : Choose the " bottom 
round" of beef; have it cut in squares; 
for every pound of meat allow a half-pint 
of cold water; keep the saucepan on the 
back of the range, where the contents 
will keep hot but not boil, for two hours, 
Till the meat has lost all its color. Skim 
out the meat then boil slowly ten min- 



utes, season with salt and pepper, and 
serve very hot. 

Chicken Jelly : Half a good-sized raw 
fowl bruised to crack the bones and break 
up the meat ; cover with a quart of cold 
water and boil slowly till the meat is in 
shreds and the liquor reduced to about 
one-half. Strain through a coarse cloth, 
season with pepper and salt, and place on 
the ice to form into a jelly. When cold 
take off all the fat and serve cold or 
make into delicate sandwiches with thin 
slices of buttered bread. 

Wine Whey : Scald one pint of new 
milk ; while very hot pour in a generous 
glass of pale sherry wine, let all boil up 
once, remove from the fire and allow the 
curd to settle. Draw off the whey, 
sweeten to taste, add a trifle of grated 
nutmeg and serve cold. 

A most delicate stomach is often able 
to retain this whey when nothing else will 
relish. 





14 



Adorn your home 




with a lasting ornament and 
a useful article at a 

MODERATE COST. 

If you are a lover of 
flo^'ers or potted plants 
30U should have a 



QUEEN 

ADJUSTABLE 
FLOWER and 
PLANT STAND. 



It contains a metal base and 
rod, giving it stability; wood- 
en top, enameled in plain col- 
ors: easily washed. Will not 
rust or warp. Can be used as a 

TABLE OE PLANT 
STAND. 

Table tops from 12 to 24 in. 
square, round or any shape 
desired. 

FKliE ILLUSTRATED 

CIRCULAR 
CONTAINING PRICES. 



THE LINCOLN COMPANY, 

54-70 Arch Street, Hartford, Conn. 




^. 



Prisgilla Compound 

Is by all odds the best, safest and most 
reliable preparation yet compounded 
for washing art embroideries, laces, 
linens, silks and all other fine and 
delicate fabrics, which require careful 
handling. Priscilla Compound cleanses 
them thoroughly, removes discoiora- 
tions, and improves their appearance 
without the slightest danger of injury 
to the most dainty fabric. 

It improves faded colors, gives a 
bright lustre to silks and a fine grass 
bleach to linens. It is highly recom- 
mended by leading authorities. 

Ask for it at the store. If you do 
not find it send us 25 cents for a one- 
half pound box and catalogue of usetul 
Embroidery Novelties. If you do not 
find it everything we claim it to be, 
your money back for the asking. 

Write for a free booklet, "The Story 
of Priscilla,"' after Longfellow. 

The Priscilla Mfg. Co., 

Hartford, Coxx. 

Manufacturers of Expansion Hoops, 

Universal Hoop Holders, 
Embroidery Sets and Novelties. 



(2/ Trench Ice Cream Dressing. 

^ , ■ [j^^^rADELICIOUS AND PALATABLE ADDITION 

^^^^' TO Vanilla Ice Cream. Ask your waiter 
■^2^ "^FOR A KREMETTE PUNCH. which is made by 
)^^rADDiNGKREMETTE TO Vanilla Ice Cream. served 

IN A PUNCH GLASS. KREMETTE IS SOLD BY ALL grocers. 

: GPHEUBLEIIM & BRO. 



HARTFORD. 



Dainty and sweet as April violets, 
and as tempting to the fastidious 
palate as the honeysuckle to the 
bee, are our choice bon-bons and 
chocolates, nut caramels and taffies. 
Rich, creamy, delicious. 

Bring a box to your wife or sweet- 
heart and see her face light up with 
pleasure. 

WERDER'S, 737 Main St. 

Telephone 137-5. 




1EDDIN6 INVITATIONS, ?St4r,'J»!,'Jr#.e<=d"o'^ 



Id pi 



GILLETTE BROTHERS, 

Dealers and Jobbers in 

Bicycles, Sporting Goods and Sundries 

198 Pearl St., Hartford, Conn. 



To Repair 
Prokou Arti- 




Remember 
MAJOR'S 

RUHHER 
CEMENT, 
MAJOR'S 

LEATHER 



PUBLISHERS' NOTES. 

Read the numerous offers in our advertis- 
ing pages. 

The publishers announce herewith the fol- 
lowing articles that will appear in our forth- 
coming May-June number : 

The dedication of the Nathan Hale School 
House by the Sons of the American Revolu- 
tion in East Haddam will be an occasion long 
to be remembered by lovers of Connecticut 
history, and the publishers recognizing the 
importance of the event, have decided to pub- 
lish an illustrated article descriptive of the 
school. An historical sketch of Nathan Hale, 
hj Charlotte Molyneux Halloway, will follow. 
Another paper which we present is a sketch 
of Governor Samuel Huntington, by Susan D. 
Huntington, which will undoubtedly be of 
great interest to all our readers. An illus- 
trated article on Stamford, Conn., will appear 
in this number. We also present in the same 
issue a handsomely illustrated article on the 
twenty or more leading golf clubs of Connecti- 
cut. The departments follow and should 
prove of much interest and value to our 
readers. 

KIPI^ING'S WORKS FREE. 

The Connecticut Magazine Co., has on 
hand a limited number of copies of No. i, 1896, 
Nos. I, 2, 3, and 4 of 1897 and Nos. i and 2 of 
1898 Connecticut Quarterlies and Nos. i, 2, 
3^ A, 5, 6, 7, 9, 10, II and 12 of the Connecticut 
Magazine. As set forth in our advertising 
pages, we will offer while they last any one 
of the above mentioned Quarterlies or any 
two of the Connecticut Magazines together 
with any one of the Volumes of Kipling's 
works named therein for 25 cents. 

The Kipling volume is absolutely free. 
If the available eighteen back numbers of the 
Quarterly and Magazine are desired we will 
give the buyer the 15 volumes complete of 
Kipling's Works. The price for the whole 
being I3 00. 

This is an offer seldom equaled and should 
draw forth a general response from our readers. 
If you desire to present a relative or acquain- 
tance with the 18 numbers of the Quarterly 
and Magazine and get a complete set of 
Kipling's Works for yourself for $3 00, here is 
your opportunity. 



ANY who are uninsured and wliose responsibilities 
necessitate making family provision, should write 
for particulars of Minimum rretuium System of 
The Home Li'e Insurance Company to Kugene A. 
Callahan, State Agt., 23 Church St., New Haven, Ct. 



"Life of Moody." Cloth, 318 pages, 25 cents, post-paid of 
C. F. Howard, Windfall, Ind. 

" Daily liread." Cloth, 192 pages, 25 cents, postpaid of 
€. F. HowAP.D, Windfall, Ind. 

Vest Pocket Dictionary (etc.) Morocco, gold edge, alpha- 
betic, 192 pages, 25 cents oi C. F. Howard, Windfall, Ind. 



CUTS AT HALF PRICE. 

The Connecticut Magazine offers for sale 
at half price cuts that are now on hand which 
have appeared in past issues of the magazine. 
Write for Prices. 

The Connecticut Magazine, Hartford, Ct. 



ONE WILL CONVINCE. 

Sold by agents only, or 
mailed on receipt of price. 

Free Catalogue. 

Write for terms. 

Season now on. 



Windsor Collar & Cuff Co., Windsor, Ct. 




LADIES 



OF HARTFORD 
AND VICINITY. 



If you wish a nice, stylish and 
elegantly finished Tailor Made 
Costume it will be to your advan- 
tage to visit . . ^ . . . . . 

E. W. ALEXANDER 

Ladies' and Gentlemen's Tailor, 
856 Main, cor. State St., Hartford, Conn. 



" KIDNACURA" CURES. 

The only sure remedy for all diseases of the Liver, 
Kidney, Bladder and Urinary Organs. 




A Specific for gravel or stones in the Bladder. 

T. SISSON & CO. and TALCOTT, FRISBIE & CO., 
Wholesale Agents, Hartford, Conn. 

If your druggist cannot supply you, write to 

GEORGE C. WASHBURN 

27 Wadsworth St., Hartford, Conn, 



Please mention the Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



Covers Greater Area than Any Other Sprinkler Made 




Height 
nin. 

Weight 



Will 
sprinkle 
an area 
four times 
greater 
than any 
other 
Sprinkler 
made. 



PRICE 
$5.00 
EACH 



Sent C. O. 
D. by 
express 
prepaid, to 
any 

address, 
with 

privilege 
of fire 
days" trial. 



THE globe or body, of the sprinkler is made in two parts, and by means of the swiftly revolving arms, and intermediate 
gears, the upper half is made to revolve slowly, carrying the hose nozzle, from which a full stream of water is thrown 
far out beyond the sprinkle of the arms, thereby covering a much larger space than any other stationary 
sprinkler. With an ordinary pressure of water, 20 pounds or upwards, it will thoroughly sprinkle an area So feet 
in diameter. The nozzle and the tips on end of arms are adjustable and can be set so as to sprinkle any desired space, or the 
nozzle can be set perpendicular to send the water upwards in a straight stream like a fountain. 

A perforated disc, or rosette, is packed in each box and can be attached in place of the nozzle tip. discharging instead of 
a solid straight stream a very fine mist at the center of the sprinkle of the revolving arms. 

With the exception of the legs all parts are of solid brass, heavily nickeled, making it the most durable, attractive and 
efficient sprinkler ever placed on the market. 

E. STEBBINS MANUFACTURING COMPANY 



SOLE AGENTS AND MANUFACTURERS, 

Agents Wanted Everywhere. Ma.de for J. B. Fellow 



SPRINGFIELD, 
; it Co.. 90 Canal 



MASS., r. S. ./. 

St.. HtiSTON. Ma<5S. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 




YOUNG MAN /VSKINTG FOR 
A BOND AS A FAVOR 



If you are required to give a bond, go to the 
Company giving you the strongest bond and 
lowest rate. All bonds executed promptly. 

Fidelity & Deposit Company of Maryland, 

E. S. COWLES, General Manager. 
25 PEARL STREET, HARTFORD, CONN. 




THE 

Y0UN6MANASKIN6F0RA 

AS A BUSINESS PROPOSITION 



T/ie Leading Fire Insurance Company of America. ' 




y^Vm. B. CLARK, President. 

W. H. KING, Secretary. E. O. WEEKS, Vice-President 

A. C. ADAMS, HENEY E. EKES, Assistant Secretaries. 



Before making a WILL 

Consult 

THE CONNECTICUT TRUST AND 
SAFE DEPOSIT COMPANY. 

It has special facilities for acting as Executor, Administrator, 
Trustee, Guardian, Conservator or Agent. Eeasonable charges. 
Wills safely kept. 

777 and 785 Main Street, Hartford, Conn. 

Meigs H. Whaples. President. 

Jacob L. Gkeene, Vice-President. 

John P. Wheeler, Treasurer. 

Henry S. Eobinson, Secisetary and Manager Trust Dept. 

HosMER P. Redfield, Assistant Treasurer. 



EOUALTO THE BEST BUT 25% CHEAPER. ASKYOUR DEALER FOR IT 




It has been officially accepted tor use 
throughout Connecticut in all the pub- 
lic offices of the state. All kinds and 
colors. Bairstow Ink Company, 
166 Pearl St., Hartford, Conn. 



Stiles's History of Ancient Windsor. 

Two volumes, royal 8 vo. Vol. I, pp. 950; Vol. II, pp. 867. 
By Henry R. Stiles, A. M., M. D. Press of the Case, Lock- 
wood & Brainard Company, Hartford, 1893. 



The first volume of this work is historical and gives an insight into the occupation and 
early struggles of the emigrants from Dorchester, who settled in Windsor in 1634; shows the 
growth of the colony, covering the struggles with the Indians, the French and Indian War, 
and the War of the Revolution ; and the action of the Town and Church in times of peace and 
war ; also names of persons holding military commissions, or otherwise prominent in public 
affairs of those early times, many of whose descendants are now prominent in different parts 
of the country in the present day and generation. 

The second volume is exclusively genealogical and contains 867 pages of matter, chiefly 
compiled from original records, much of which cannot be found in any other printed work. 

The descendants of the early settlers of Windsor are found in every state in the Union 
and are distinguished in all the learned professions, upon the bench, in literature, and in all 
business callings. Innumerable families in distant states trace their early genealogy to ancient 
Windsor. In many cases the families are brought down to modern times in respect to the 
descendants now living in Connecticut. Residents of other states will find much interesting 
information relating to the early period of their family history. 

Both volumes are abundantly illustrated with pictures of ancient buildings, gravestones, 
coats of arms, steel-plate portraits and autographs. 

To those interested in genealogical research this work is of inestimable value. Edition 
limited. 



Price (in cloth) $20.00, (in half-Turkey Morocco) $25.00. Terms net cash. 
Address, LEWIS SPERRY, Hartford. Conn. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 







1 






fe 
^^)1 



% 



m 



WORKMANSHIP AND DESIGN M^l 

o^§^tjfe^§|j No back-lash to the driving gear. All the running parts proof lfeol|S,oO 
n^o^*^/)^ against mud or dust. The driving gear the strongest part of a ma- Vvt^Oo? -^ 












mi 



chine, strong throughout. An easy hill climber, a delightful coaster, 

swift and safe on the level. Reduced in weight and greatly improved. 

That is the 

BEVEL-GEAR 

CHAINLESS 

FOR J900 

Columbia Bevel-Gears do not deteriorate but improve with use. They 

are generated by improved autonutic machines which . are found 

only in our factories. 

The Columbia Bevel-Gear Chainless demonstrated its superiority on the 

road in 1898, and left the chain driven bicycle out of sight on the track 

in 1899. 

It is a machine which the rider can purchase with the assurance that 
it is perfectly adapted to all conditions of riding. A change of equip- 
ment as regards tires, handle-bar and height of gear, converts it from 



m 



■Ma 

JcPoCh 



Wd^t 



the Ideal Roadster to the Ideal Track Racer. Prices $75, $60. V^^^o^ 

COLUMBIA, HARTFORD, STORMER and PENNANT chain ^>^'^° 

wheels by reason of their general excellence and their wide range /^^^ qki 

^o§^V^^'o<^ of pattern and price comprise the most representative line of 1900 /fobB^^t^ 



bicycles of the chain type. Prices $50, $35, $30, $25. 



^^^^^*WoV^ '^^^ Columbia Coaster Brake does its work without wearing or Jt^^^s>c^^6 
""^ ^ j!%k straining the running parts of the machine. It is applicable j 






straining the running parts of the machine. It is applicable 
to both Chainless and Chain 
models. Price $5.00. j. ■■ ■ 






pope $]\t€% D€PJiRcrm€iici 

i5Jiiic?OR».€onn. 






m 



BICYCLES 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when writing; to advertisers. 



HISHOLINESS POPE LEO XIII 
AWARDS GOLD MEDAL 

In l^ecognition ofBcnefits KccciA?ed from 




D 


Vvm 


m 



MARIANI WINE TONIC 

Spec/ai OPF£/f - ro d// w/?o ivr/Ve c/s /n en/ion- 
i/?^ ^/?/s paper, we sen(f a doo/rcon/^am/n^ por- 
/ra/As a/?c/ e/7c/orsemeA7/-s offMPS/fo/fS, ^mppsss, 
Pp/a/c£sSapd/a/ais^ A/icnb/smops, a/7c/ o^/?er C//SA//7- 
^u/s/?ec/ personages. 

AfA/?/AA// S: Co., 52 IVssr /£''." Sr //FivVop/f. 

FOff SAiEATAii DPi/GG/STs £yf/?yiv//£/f£. A\/owsi/3sr/ri/r£S. B£fVA/f£ 0£m/rAr/o/\/s. 
PA/f/s-^/Bou/eydrcif//dussmap/7. I OA^DON-SJ/^or/'/merSr. Afor?lred/-87Sr.Ja/??esSt. 



:>DE5I0nER- 

comiECnajf 




SIDENTv 

SUSE£NDERj 

Made upon the right 
I principle for comfort, 
1 style and service. 
, No leather to stain the 
,.-' / clothing; adjusts front 

'^ and back ; fits and sat- 
isfies every one who wears 
it. The inventor of the 
,' President Suspender has 
skilfully combined in it every 
; desirable feature, making it the 
; most practical and stylish sus- 
pender ever offered. 
If your d^-alor rtops not have them 
we wil! send you a pair for 50 ets. 
C^^. Ell»C^A.KTOM MFG.CO. 
ISox 133 Shirley, M:iss. 



PRESERVE 



YOU 



iQUARTERLIES 



They will make a valuable addition to 
your library when they are Jjound. 

WE BIND THEM in Russia Back and Corners, 
Raised Bands, with Marble Paper Sides, $i.oo 

Per Volume of one year. 

In Turkey Morocco Back and Corners, as above, $1.25 

All kinds and qualities of Magazine Binding. 

Blank Books of every description with flat opening backs. 

The Case, Lockwood & Brainard Co., 

HARTFORO, COTVN. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when writino: to advertisers. 



TO NEW YORK DAILY 




Stopping at all Connecticut Kiver Landings. 



I,OW RATKS. 
Quick Dispatch. 
Passenger and 



SECURITY. 

COMFORT. 

REFRESHING 
SI.KEP. 



Freight lyine. 

Passenger Accommodations First Class. 

Shipments received on pier in New York until 6 p. 
m. and forwarded to all points mentioned on Connecti- 
cut river, and points North, Fast and West from Hart- 
ford. We also have through traffic arrangements with 
lines out of New York or points South and West, and 
shipments can be forwarded on through rates, and 
Bills of leading obtained from offices of the Company. 
For Excursion Rates see daily papers. 

Hartford and New York 
Transportation Co. 

steamers " Middletown " and "Hartford" — 
I^eave Hartford from foot State St. at 5 p. m. — I^eave 
New York from Pier 24, East River, at 5 p. m. — Daily 
except Sundays. 



V%^VVVV%^'VVV%^^VVVVVVV%^VVVVVVVVVVVVV«^V 



w%v 



DIRECr ROUTE to tlie WEST! 

with only one change of cars between 
Hartford and Chicago. 




The shortest, cheapest and most convenient route. 
Train leaves Har;ford at 12.40 P. M., connects at \ 
C-ampbel! Hall with fast express over O. W. and 
Wabash road, arriving at Chicago next day 9 P. M. 
Only one night on road. 

CENTRAL NEW ENGLAND RAILWAY. 

Poughkeepsie Bridge Route. 
For information apply to 
W. J. MARTIN, Gen'l Passenger Agent, 
Hartford, Conn. 



COOK REMEDY CO. 



HAS THE ONLY 
KNOWN CURE FOR 



B LOOD POISON 



Primary, Secondary or Tertiary 
Blood Poison PERMANENTLY 
CURED in 15 to 35 days. You 

can be treated at home for the same price 
under same g'uaranty. If you prefer to 
come here we will contract to pay railroad fare and hotel bills and no charge if we fail to cure. If you have 
taken merCUry, iodide potash, and still have aches and pains, MuCOllS Patches in mouth, 
Sore Throat, Pimpies, Copper-Colored Spots, Ulcers on any part of the body, Hair 
or Eyebrows falling" out, it is this BLOOD POISON that we guarantee to cure. We 
solicit the most obstinate cases and challenge the Avorld for a case we can not cure. 
This disease has always baffled the skill ot the niost eminent physicians. 

Several of our most prominent public men, Kings and Emperors of foreign lands have succumbed to this 
disease — even when under the treatment of the best talent unlimited wealth of nations could employ, but we 
have a SECRET REMEDY known only to ourselves. During the many years of our existence 
no less than twenty different concerns ha,ve started up to imitate our treatment, prompted by our unprece- 
dented success; to-day not one of them remains in business. 

WE STAND ALONE without a Single Successful Competitor. 

THE COOK REMEDY CO. has permanently cured thousands and has a world-wide repu- 
tation for speedy cures, honesty and integrity. NO DECEPTION, NO FREE SAMPLE 
CATCH, NOR C. O. D. METHODS. Advice and absolute proofs of cures and 
unbroken pledges sent sealed in plain packages on application. NO BRANCH OFFICES. 

ONE MILLION DOLLARS BEHIND OUR GUARANTY. 

Address COOK REMEDY CO., 385 Masonic Temple, Chicago, III. 

Please mention The Connectitut Magazine when vou write to advertisers. 



Beowi, poured .o..Men QjRgy.s MAGNESIA FLEXIBLE CEMENT ROOFING. 



in the process of layinc 



%r 



1 , 



i 




-^o-:: 



fl 




NO LEAKY 
ROOFS 

from 

SPRING 

RAINS 

If you use Carey's 
Cement Rooting. 

It is a non-conductor 
of heat and cold, and is 
absolutely water-proof 
and fire-proof. It is very 
easily applied as the 
illustration shows. 

WITHSTANDS 

ALL THE 

ELEMENTS. 

FREE SAMPLES TO 
PROPERTY OWNERS. 



WRITE FOR SAMPLE TO 

JOHN B. CLAPP & SON^ G\ Market St.. Hartford, Conn. 



SILK DRESS 



FREE 

H IB ^Bh HIB Here is an honest advertisement. N^o beating around the^ 

bush. Tou can get full lO to 15 yards of beautiful silk. Black, brown. bine, giecn orpink, in 

light or dark shades, and a beautiful mercury diamond breat^t pin for selliiiiT our remedies. 

We ta.k plain English & guarantee to do exactly as we say. We don't ask a cput- If tou agree to sell 

only 6 boxes of our PosltiveCorn Cure at a."* <-t9. a box, we send you the Salve by mail. When soldyou 

send us the $1.50 and we send you tl)e solid gold laid mercury diamond bre;ipt pin. together with 

our offer of a handsome silk dress, same day money is received . We make this extraordinary induce- J 

ment to secure honest people and prove our Corn Cure the best on earth. There is no chance aboutit 

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eiven absolutely free. I>on't pay out money for a handsomf> dress while you can get one free for selling our rem- 
edies. Address at once, MANLFACTLKElis.' SUPPLY DEPT. '• O," Ko. 65, 5th Ave., A.Y. City 





THE SAME 
OLD WAY. 



ON'T SET HENS 

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maker. Agents wanted. Send nnn [TrOO ' 
for catalog telling how to get UIIC I I CD 
Natural Hen Incubator Co., B 31 Columbus, Neb. 



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M SUFFERERS FROM 
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Can be permanently cured at their homes without pain, publicity or detention from business. No opiates used 
and Ar,Ii NATURAIi POWERS FULL.Y RESTORED. Our free trial treatment alone cures hundreds of 
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taining the ACTIVE LIFE PRINCIPLE. The most difficult cases successfully trented ; perfect health restored; 
results absnhitelv srr»>. All communications strictly confidential. Address HOME TREATMENT CO., 
48 West 34th St., New York City, or J. C. McALPINE, at same address. 

IVhm a feiu n/ our patients say : ♦* Sample ju«t Koiie; It i« two weckn sinee I have touehed the driisr." 



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hardly know how to write you, I 
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Cbe Standard 



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Yorx, tenor; Frederick Blair 
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Rartfora Conservatory of mu$lc 
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252 HsyiMiti $t. * Bartrord, Conn. 

Comprises some of the very best New 
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violoncellist; and W. V. Abell, voice 




For further information>pply to W. V. ABELL, Musical Directoi 






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Historical and Genealogical 
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♦♦♦♦♦» »»<»wv^v»^»v< » »»»«»»»»» 

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Observations ( 

By RATCLIFFE HICKS. 

With portrait. i6o,$i.oo. 



This book contains no studied observations 
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KIPLING'S WORKS FREE!! 




TOIiUME I. Mine Own People. Introduction by Henry James.— Bimi. — Namgay Doola. — The Recru- 
descence of Imray. — Moti Guj, Mutineer. — The Mutiny of the Mavericks. — At the End of the Passage.— The 
Incarnation of Krishna Mulvaney. — The Man Who Was. — On Greenhow Hill. 

TOfiUME II. Plain Tales from the Hills. Thirty-nine Stories. 

TOLUME III. The Light That Failed. 

VOIiUME IV. Soldiers Three. The God from the Machine.— Private I^earovd's Storv.— The Big Drunk 
Draft.— The Solid Muldoon.— With the Main Guard.— In the Matter of a Private.— Black Jack.— Only a Subal- 
tern. Printed from the first edition of 1888, which now sells at $65 a copy. 

TOIIUME V. The Phantom 'Rickshaw. My Own True Ghost Story.— The Strange Ride of :Morrowbie 
Jukes.— The Man Who Would Be King. 

roiiUME VI. Story of the Gadshys. Poor Dear Mama.— The World Without.— The Tents of Kedar. 
—With Any Amazement.— The Garden of Eden.— Fatlma.— The Valley of the Shadow.— The Swelling of Jodan. 

VOIiUME VII. The I'ourting of Dinah Shadd. A Conference of the Powers.— City of Dreadful Night. 
The first Indian edition is held at $27.50 a copy. 

VOIiUMK VIII. In Black and White. Dedication.— Introduction.— Dray Wars Yow Dee.— The Judg- 
ment of Dungara.— At Howil Thana.— Gemini.— At Twenty-two.— At Flood Time.— The Sending of Dana Da.— On 
the City Wall. The first Indian edition is now held at I24 a copy. 

VOLUME IX. Under the Deodars. The Education of Otis Yeere.— At the Pit's Mouth.— A Wayside 
Comedy.— The Hill of Illusion.— A Second-Rate Woman.— The first Calcutta edition is now sold at S24 a copy, 

VOLUME X. Wee Willie Winkie. Baa, Baa, Black Sheep.— His Majesty the King.— The Drums of the 
Fore and Aft.— Without Benefit of Clergy. The first Calcutta edition now held for $24 a copy. 

VOLUME XI. American;;Notes. Sixteen Chapters. 

VOLUME XII. Letters oi IHarque. .^"'ineteen I^etters. Smith Administration, 18 Chapters. The first 
Indian edition of 189 1 is now sold at $50 a copy. 

VOLUME XIII. Letters from the East. 

VOLUME XIV. Departmental Ditties. Including The Vampire, The Recessional, The Three Captains. 

VOLUME XV. Barrack Koom Ballads. Including Danny Deever and Mandalay. 

THIS CHARMING SET OF HIS WORKS i° .fifteen volumes, is an ideal edition. In size it is 

*A*^ unique, a tall i6mo— the i2mo Size is too large for the 

pocket — and this "just fits." The type is large, long primer, larger than any daily newspaper uses for editorial, 
and made especially for this edition. The paper is the finest used in book work, the ink is the best, and the 
presswork is so carefully and daintily done that each page is a typographical delight to the eye. The whole set 
contains over 3,000 pages. 

The bindings of this edition are something new in bookmaking. a patent thread sewing whereby the same 
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The edition is daintily bound in delicately tinted linen, half-flexible, which will wear like iron. The 
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No expense has been spared— divided among the million sets it did not matter what expense was gone to — 
to make this the ideal edition for the people. 

WE HAVE ON HAND a limited number of copies of No. r. 1896, Nos. i, 2. 3 and 4 of 1897, and Nos. i and 
2 of 1898 Connecticut Quarterlies and Nos. i, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7. 9, 10, 11 and 12, 1S99. of The Connecticut Magazine. 

By Special Arrangement with the Frank F. IvOvell;]Co., 
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above mentioned Qu.\rtkrliks or 

ANY TWO of the above mentioned Connecticut Magazines for 26 Cents. Or. A COMPLETE SET OF IS VOLS. 
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No 

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What 

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COME AND TRY THE 

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WILLIAMS' SHAVING SOAPS are SIMPLY INCOMPARABLE 

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The Boston 



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Was an immense success. Had King 
George sent BLACK PACKAGE RUS- 
SIAN CARAVAN TEA, instead of 
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a different disposition of those three car- 
goes in Boston Harbor. 

However, we wish to have a tea party 
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eighth pound package of our Caravan 
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OUR REASONS? ^ READ THEM 
Absolute Purity, 

Economical Possibilities, 

General Satisfaction and a 

Healthful Beverage. 



B. FISCHER & CO., 

Tea and Coffee Importers, 
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P. S. If you prefer, send your name, and 
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OMO DRESS SHIELD 




THE PERFECT DRESS SHIELD. 

Why ? i- Eecause it is absolutely odorless 
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ONCE USED ALWAYS USED 

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\ --'^^^ "c^i^ TYPE 




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CO» <^ 

SYRACUSE 
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vy/vr-/? Ar 




V 



H. 



Serial Story— THE GLEBE HOUSE— written by Chauncey C. Hotchkiss, author of " A Colonial 
Pree I.ance " and " In Defiance of the King."— BE)GAN IN JANUARY— CONCLUDED IN AUGUST. 




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J. a BATTERSON, President. 

S. C. DUNHAM, Vice-President. H. J. MESSENGER, Actuary. 

JOHN E. MORRIS, Secretary. E. V. PRESTON, Sup't of Agencies. 

FRED. R. LOYDON, State Agent, Address, Home Office. 



THE 



Connecticut Magazine 



AN ILLUSTRATED BI-MONTHLY. 

Devoted to Connecticut in its various phases of History, Literature, 
Picturesque Features, Science, Art and Industries. 



MAY -JUNE, 1900, 



Vol. VI. 



CONTENTS. 



No. 4. 



**Thaddcus, Do Yott Remember These ?'^ Glebe House. 

Illustrated by Sarah E. Francis. 
Stamford, J64J-J900. Illustrated. Julie Adams Powell. 

The First Sacrifice of the Rcvoltition. Illustrated. Charlotte Molyneaux Holloivay 
The Glebe House. Illustrated. Chauncey C. Hotchkiss. 

May. Poem. Sally Porter Law. 

The Nathan Hale School House in East Haddam. 



(Frontispiece.) 
209 
224 
237 
242 



Illustrated. 




Francis H Parker, 


243 


Samuel Huntington. Illustrated. 




Susan D. Huntington. 


247 


Miss Genevieve Hecker. Portrait. 






254 


Golf Clubs in Connecticut. Illustrated. 




W. D. Freer. 


255 


To A Sunbeam. Poem. 




Margherita Arlina Hamtn. 


284 


Nathan Hale. Poem. 




Genevieve Hale Whitlock. 


285 


The Departments. 








Historical Notes and Correspondence. 




286 


Genealogical Department. 






288 


Current Events. Illustrated. 






291 


Floriculture. 




Edited by Rev. Magec Pratt. 


297 


Editorial Notes. 






300 


Home Department. 




Edited by Louise IV. Bunce. 


306 


H. Phelps Arms, Editor. 




H. C. Buck, Business Manager. 


EDW1.RD B. Eaton, 


Advertising Manager. 





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ANEW BOOK just issued deals in a fas- 
cinating manner with European Coun- 
tries and Customs* ''Observations'' 
is its title, and its author, Ratcliffe Hicks* The 
book has received the highest testimonials from 
the reading puhliC'^M^^^^^^^^^^H^^^^H 



145 West 58th Street, 
New York, Jan. 27, 



[900. 



" Observations " is one of the most 
delightfully interesting books a man 
ever placed between thumb and fin- 
gers. So interested did 1 become in its 
contents that I sat up until the "small 
hours " enjoying the treat, or, in other 
words, remained unsatisfied until I 
had finished the book. 

Edward Quintard, M.D. 



St. Patrick's Church, 
St. Paul, Minn., Feb. 19, 1900. 

I was more than delighted with the 
book " Observations." What struck 
me, apart from its interesting details, 
was its sobriety of judgment and what 
I may call its trueness. I am familiar 
with all the Latin and Teutonic lan- 
guages, so I can appreciate the work, 
1 loaned it to others who have traveled 
extensively in Europe, and they like- 
wise were struck with the justness of 
your views. I read the work all 
through at one sitting. 

JAMES C. Byrne, 

Ex-Pres. St. Thomas' College. 



Connecticut Agricultural College, 

Storrs, Conn., Feb. 12, 1900. 
1 found it so entertaining that I had 
to finish it at a single sitting. 

Geo. W. Flint, President. 



37 W. 58th St., New York City. 
It is a most interesting and instruc- 
tive work. It is a classic in simplicity. 
F. F. HOYT, M.D. 



Brown University, 
Providence, March 12, 1900. 
I have read with much interest the 
book of "Observations." I like es- 
pecially the concrete statements, the 
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The Connecticut Magazine. 



Vol. 6. 



May-June, 1900. 



No. 4. 



"^ 



STAMFORD 





.C»-5^PL~. 




STAMFORD — 1 641-1900. 



BY JULIE ADAMS POWELL. 



THE early history of Stamford is 
closely associated with the history 
of the Congregational Church. 

It was in 1641 that a little company of 
men separated from the Wethersfield 
Colony and settled in the valley of the 
Rippowam, which was surrounded then, 
as now, by beautifully wooded hills. 

The Wethersfield settlement, together 
with Windsor and Hartford, comprised 
the Colony of Connecticut, founded 
by Thomas Hooker. About the year 1640 

209 



disagreement arose among the colonists, 
and the advice was sought of the honored 
and Reverend John Davenport, who, with 
his friend, Theophilus Eaton, had founded 
the New Haven Colony. Mr. Davenport 
tried to convince the people that peace 
was better than strife and to be content, 
but history shows that his appeals were in 
vain, and during that summer Captain 
Nathaniel Turner was sent by the New 
Haven Colony to the valley of the Rip- 
powam to bargain with the Indian chief- 



2IO 



STAMFORD, 164.1-igoo. 




BLACHELKY MANOR " RESIDKNCE OF THE lyATE 
JOSEPH B. HOYT. 



tains for land on which the Wethersfield 
people might settle. 

An agreement was made with the four 
chiefs or sagamores, who lay claim to all 
the land which was charmingly situated 



Across the bay lay the terri- 
tory of "Meyanos," and to the 
east the tribes of " Piamikin," the 
sagamore of Rowayton were en- 
gaged in hunting and fishing along 
the shores of the sound. 

The records tell us that Ponus 
and Wascussee transferred to 
Captain Nathaniel Turner all 
the land owned by Ponus, ex- 
cepting a piece of ground re- 
served by ^' Ponus, and the rest 
of said Indians to plant upon." 
Captain Turner pledged himself 
" to give or bring or send to the above- 
said sagamores, within the space of one 
month, 12 coats, 12 hoes, 12 hatchets, 
12 glasses, 12 knives and 4 fathoms of 
white wampum." 



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VIEW ON MAIN STREET. 



between the Meyanos River on the west, 
and the Rowayton River on the east. The 
shore-land, which sloped gradually down 
to the sea, was ruled over by " Wascus- 
see," while to the north, among the rolling 
hill, " Ponus " reigned supreme. 



Captain Turner then returned to the 
New Haven Colony and reported. Satis- 
factory terms were decided upon and 
deputies from the Wethersfield Colony 
were sent to " Toguams," as the new land 
was called by Captain Turner, to inspect 



STAMFORD, 1641-igoo. 



211 




RIPPOWAM RIVER NEAR WOODSIDE PARK. 



their prospective home, which was also 
known as " The Wethersfield Men's Plan- 
tation." 

In the following summer of the year 
1 64 1, twenty-nine of the Wethersfield 
settlers journeyed to " Rippowam," which 
was the true name of their new home, 
taking with them their families, their 
household furnishings, their rude farming- 
implements, their cattle and their small 
libraries, which consisted of the 
family bible and of religious 
books, which were read by both 
old and young. 

Rude houses were built ; 
some more pretentious than 
others. The immense stone 
chimney was in the center of 
the house, its base being nearly 
as large as some of our modern 
cottages. This often contained 
small cupboards and cubbyholes, 
where the pioneers kept their 
valuables. Many of these houses 
were of one story, but oft'times 



a stairway led to a loft 
above. The front door 
opened into a hall, on 
each side of which was 
a large room, serving as 
bedroom and sitting- 
room, according to the 
size of the family, which 
was often very large. In 
the rear of the house was 
the living room where 
the food was cooked in 
the great fire place. One 
part of these large chim- 
neys served as an oven, 
and on baking day the 
good wife spread on the 
floor of her oven dried 
oak leaves, where, without 
platter or pan, the bread 
was baked a golden 
brown. 
By fall of this same year, forty families 
were established in Rippowam, and when 
the first town meeting was held, Francis 
Bell and Andrew Warde were appointed 
representatives from the new town to the 
General Court of New Haven, where they 
were recognized as " the honorable mem- 
bers from Rippowam." 

This Francis Bell was the father of the 
first white child born in the town of Stam- 




RESIDKNCE OF MRS. OLIVER HOYT. 



212 



STAMFORD, 1641-igoo. 




RESIDENCE OF HON. JAMES D. SMITH. 



ford in 1 64 1. He was the ancestor of a 
family represented in Stamford in every 
succeeding generation 
down to the present. 

At the April session of 
1642 the name Rippowam 
was changed to Stamford, 
but the old Indian name 
still clings to the winding 
stream which runs through 
the town, finding its outlet 
in the Sound. 

The organization of the 
Congregational Church 
dated from 1635, and 
when the Wethersfield 
families emigrated to the 
new land on the banks of the Rippowam, 
they were accompanied by their pastor. 



Rev. Richard Denton. The 
church records were also 
transferred, thus making 
the Congregational Church 
of Stamford, " the first town 
of Connecticut Congrega- 
tional Churches." Rev. 
Richard Denton, after three 
years of pastoral work left 
the colonists to go to 
Long Island, and they were 
without a "spiritual ad- 
viser." In the " History of 
the Churches of Connecticut" it is 
stated. the "two brethren journeyed on 





SUBURBAN CLUB. 



RKSIDJ5NCE OF JOHN T. WII^I^IAMS. 

foot, nearly to Boston to bring back 
with them a certain John Bishop who 
had been highly spoken of." 
Mr. Bishop died in 1694, and 
the Rev. John Davenport of 
New Haven, who was a grand- 
son of John Davenport who 
founded the New Haven Colony, 
was called upon to fill the place 
of Mr. Bishop, which he held for 
thirty-four years. The tomb of 
the Rev. John Davenport is in 
the Congregational burying 
ground on North Street. 

One of the pioneer figures 
mentioned in Stamford's early 



STAMFORD, 1641-igoo. 



213 



history, is Captain John 
Underhill, who was the 
first man to take the peril- 
ous journey from Boston, 
on the waters of the 
Sound, to the mouth of 
the Rippowam River, 
where he was joyously 
greeted by the Stamford 
pioneers. 

Captain Underhill later 
acquired distinction as an 
Indian fighter, and military 
leader. There was one 
fight of special note in 
which he was engaged 
most conspicuously, and 
which took place in 1644. 

The Indians in New York had been 
having serious trouble with the Dutch; 
the latter, when trusted by the red men, 
proving treacherous. This led to war 
between the settlements on Long Island, 
Manhattan Island, along the Connecticut 
and Hudson Rivers, and the savage tribes. 
The latter came as far east as Stamford, 
killing both Dutch and English. 

There were living near Greenwich, great 
numbers of Indians, among them being 
Meyanos, who had become hostile. 





•GOTHIC HALI," FORMER HOME OF COLONEL GEORGE S. WARING 



RESIDENCE OF HENRY P. BARTLETT. 

At this time Captain Underhill joined 
the Dutch forces in New Amsterdam, from 
whence he was sent to Stamford to obtain 
information concerning the hostile Iii- 
dians near that place. He landed here 
one stormy evening in February, with one 
hundred and thirty men, and marching to 
the banks of the iSIeyanos River, they saw 
the Indian village ahead of them. The 
three long rows of wigwams could easily 
be discerned in the bright moonlight. The 
Dutch advanced quickly upon the enemy, 
and a most horrible massacre followed. 
Five hundred Indians 
were killed, only eight 
escaping. This ended 
the war, and also re- 
moved much of the 
fear which had been 
the hourly experience 
of the settlers, though 
for some years after 
there were murderous 
attacks on the whites^ 
and this state of affairs 
continued until about 
1700, at which time 
more pioneers arrived : 
dwelling houses be- 
came more commodi- 



214 



STAMFORD, 1641-igoo. 




RESIDENCE OF EDWARD I.EAV1TT. 
STRAWBERRY HII,!,. 

ous; Stores were opened, supplies being 
obtained from trading vessels which plied 
between Boston and New Amsterdam. 

Stamford's first meeting house was lo- 
cated near the present site of the Town 
Hall, and is described as follows : ^' a 
structure square built and low ; its posts 
scarcely a dozen feet in length ; the four 
sections of its roof meeting over the cen- 
ter at a height of about thirty feet. One 
wide door opening into an area which 
was undivided by partition and unseated 
save by rude benches around the three 
sides, looking towards the minister's high 
stand; unadorned by art of sculp- 
ture or of painting, and never relieved 
of summer sun by blinds, or of 
keenest winter cold by furnace or 
stove." 

It was not until the year 1748 
that a subscription was started by the 
pastor of the church, Rev. Noah 
Welles, for a bell to take the place of 
the drum which had so many years 
called the good people to meeting, 
and not until 1790 was a large Rus- 
sian stove of brick introduced into the 
church, when the Society built a new 
place for worship, which for many 
years after the opening of the nine- 
teenth ceatury stood on the village 
green. The last religious service was 



held in it Septeniber 19, 1858, 
and the present edifice on the 
corner of Atlantic and Bank 
Streets was dedicated in the 
same year. The old building 
was removed to a side street, 
where it is now /used as a liv- 
ery stable. While a place of 
worship, the building was very 
roomy. It contained " slips " 
and old-fashioned square pews. 
The plain pulpit was reached by 
winding stairs on either side. 
There were deep galleries along 
the sides and front of the house, 
the one in front being devoted to the 
choir. Beneath this gallery were the 
stoves, one on each side of the door. 
Small square foot stoves were then the 
fashion and were carried in the hand up 
the aisles. The stone steps which lead 
into one of Stamford's jewelry stores, are 
the same stones, that formed the steps to 
the middle entrance of the old Congrega- 
tional Church. 

The pastor of the Congregational 
Church in Stamford is Rev. William J. 
Long, Ph, D., who succeeded Rev. Samuel 
Scoville in the fall of 1899, Mr. Scoville 




THE BUILDING WITH I,ARGE OPEN DOOR IS 
THE CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH WHICH STOOD 
ON THE "village green" UNTIL 1858— NOW 
USED AS A LIVERY STABLE. 



STAMFORD, 1641-igoo. 



215 



having resigned after a pastorate 
of twenty years. 

The name of Davenport has 
long been associated with the 
town of Stamford. The Hon- 
orable Abraham Davenport was 
a resident of Stamford during 
the Revolutionary War. One of 
our historians says of him, " He 
was distinguished for uncom- 
mon firmness of mind, a vigor- 
ous understanding and christian 
integrity of character. Abraham 
Davenport was a man who 
brought to the ordinary business 
affairs of the town trustworthy 
management and guidance; to its mili- 
tary and political organization he brought 
to the courage and force of an intelli- 
gent and stanch patriot ; to its best social 
life, he contributed by example the 
manners, tastes and habits of a scholar 
and a gentleman." 

He was the Colonel Davenport of" dark 
day" fame in New Haven, May 17, 1780, 
who preferred to be found doing his duty 
even if the Judgment Day were approach- 





AMIZI DAVENPORT HOMESTEAD — ERECTED I775. 



RESIDENCE OF ROBERT A. FOSDICK. 

ing and ordered candles lighted. Stam- 
ford is fortunate in claiming as one of ber 
"town fathers" a man t>f so much 
strength of mind as Abraham Davenport. 
Stamford took part in the French and 
Indian Wars, and those men whose work 
was well done, and who afterwards were 
heard of in the Revolutionary War, were 
David Waterbury, Charles Webb, Joseph 
Hoyt and Jonathan Wooster. Side by 
side with Abraham Davenport, who stood 
at the head of the 
civilians, were Col- 
onel David Water- 
bury, who later 
earned the rank of 
general ; Joseph 
Hoyt, the leader of 
our minute men, and 
who became "colo- 
nel of the fighting 
seventh," and the 
Holly's, the Knapps, 
the Scofields, t h e 
Smiths and the 
Webbs. 

Stamford has been 
represented in every 
war in which the 
United States has 



2l6 



STAMFORD, 1641-igoo. 




RESIDENCE OF HENRY O. HAVEMEYER, PAI^MER'S HII.Iv 



been engaged, the late war with Spain, 
not excepted. 

During the Revolutionary War the little 
town was prepared for the struggle. Her 
^'fr)rt" is still in a well preserved condi- 
tion, situated a few miles north-west of 
the city, and is one of the most interest- 
ing Revolutionary relics to be found in 
Stamford. At the time of the war the 
garrison stationed here was composed of 
some eight hundred men. 

When the nineteenth century opened, 
Stamford's population was between four 
and five thousand. Its industries were 
growing, there being in existence several 
mills, factories and tanneries. The old 
grist mill at the '^Waterside " was still in 
running order. It had been the most im- 
portant business institution 
in the town since 1642. 

There were five stores in 
the center of the village, 
and as they were run much 
the same as the " depart- 
ment" store of the present 
day, although on a much 
smaller scale, they supphed 
the wants of the people. 

One of these stores was 
shared with the Post Office, 
and for many years it was 
on the corner of an alley 
which led to the '' Stage 
Yard." The Stamford Post 
Offije is now one of t'-'C 



principal distributing 
offices of the State, 
occupying a large 
part of the first floor 
of the Town Hall. 

The old Metho- 
dist Church has long 
since been trans- 
formed into a double 
dwelling house. In 
those days it had a 
very plain pulpit at 
one end, with the 
customary gallery at the other. There 
were four rows of pews, and the room was 
lighted by large comfortable windows, 
through which the sun shone brightly. 

The Methodist Episcopal Church, now 
standing at the head of West Park, was 
dedicated in 1859. Attached to it is the 
chapel, and the pastor of this church oc- 
cupies the parsonage on Main Street. 

The old Town House which stood op- 
posite the village green was an ancient, 
four-cornered, oblong, gable-roofed edi- 
fice comprised of two stories, and ugly 
beyond all description. Here the colored 
Methodists worshiped, and here, too, the 
Stamford Cornet Band rehearsed. 

In the year 1824 General Lafayette was 
the guest of Major John Davenport at the 




RESIDENCE OF J. STUART CAMPBEI^I.. 



STAMFORD, 1641-igoo. 



217 




RESIDENCE OF JAMES G. RAYMOND. 

Davenport homestead on Main Street. 
Lafayette stood on the steps of the old 
house and was patriotically welcomed by 
the people of Stamford. This part of the 
house is yet standing, not having been 
destroyed as have so many of Stamford's 
Revolutionary houses, for the purpose of 
making room for business blocks. The 
house was moved a few years ago to 
Summer Street. 

The first fifty years of the nineteenth 
century showed but little change in the 
town of Stamford. In 1848 the coming 
of the railroad brought both social and 
political changes. About this time Cen- 
ter School was erected ; the Stamford 
Manufacturing Company at the Cove, the 
Woolen Mills and 
other factories 
came into exist- 
ence. In 1855 the 
streets were lighted 
by gas. 

When the Civil 
War began, about 
eight hundred of 
Stamford's " boys 
in blue," responded 
to their country's 
call. Some came 
home and are alive 
to tell their grand- 
children of the 
sufferings of that 
cruel time, and to 



praise the good women of Stamford 
who remained at home *'to -stitch 
and to wait " for the husbands, sens 
and brothers, many of whom found 
graves on southern battle fields. 

''Webb's Tavern," or known more 
generally as the " Old Washington 
Inn," which had stood for so many 
years on Main Street, was de- 
molished m 1868. It was here that 
Washington stopped on one of his 
trips and in front of the tavern in 1775, 
the Stamford patriots burned the ''Bohea 
tea," to the accompaniment of fife 
and drum. 

In 1742 St. John's Episcopal Parish was 
established in Stamford, and in 1747 the 
first church was built. The present hand- 
some stone edifice was erected in 1891. 
The rector of St. John's Church is Rev. 
Charles Morris .Addison. 

St. Andrew's Church on Washington 
Avenue, was the first outgrowth of St. 
John's Parish and was erected in i860. 
Rev. F. Windsor Brathwaite, the present 
rector of St. Andrew's, was elected to the 
rectorship in 1865. 

St. John's Roman Catholic Church, a 




ST. JOHN'S EPISCOPAI, CHURCH. 



2l8 



STAMFORD, 1641-igoo, 



beautiful and imposing edifice of stone on 
Atlantic Street, was erected in 1886. Rev. 
William H. Rogers is the present in- 
cumbent. The Parochial School, adjoin- 
ing the church, is in charge of the Sisters 
of Mercy, 

The Presbyterian Church of Stamford 
came into existence in 1853. The first 
wooden church was built on the site of 
the present fine stone edifice on Broad 
Street. Rev. R. P. H. Vail is the pastor. 

The Stamford Baptist Church was es- 
tablished as early as 1773. Their house 
of worship is of brick, and situated on At- 
lantic Street. For many years Mr. Joseph 
B. Ifoyt was a conspicuous member of the 
church, and at his death in 1888 he left 
the church property free of debt, and an 
estate of ^30,000 besides a suitable par- 
sonage where resides the pastor, Rev. 
George Braker. 

The Universalist Church was organized 
in 1 84 1. The present beautiful stone 
structure, near Bedford Park, was erected 
in 1870. Rev. E. M. Grant has been 
pastor of the church since 1881. 

The Town Hall building of to-day was 
erected in 1870. From this date to the 
present time notable changes have taken 
place in Stamford. Shippan is a place of 
summer cottages, and a favorite shore re- 
sort. 




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f/!fe 





RESIDENCE OF REV. R. P. H. VAIL, D. D 



PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH. 

Here is to be found the comfortable 
home of the Stamford Yacht Club. In 
the early part of the century Shippan was 
owned by Moses Rogers of New York 
who laid out the land " most charmingly " 
in flower gardens, fruit orchards, and 
formed an avenue nearly a mile in length 
reaching to the water's edge, where were 
planted trees of many varieties. 

Along the edge of the shore on the high 
bank a row of Lombardy poplars stood 
like so many sentinels to 
guard the coast. The 
flower garden is no more ; 
the trolley car runs down 
the avenue ; all that remain 
of the stately poplars are 
a few ghosts, standing leaf- 
less and gaunt against the 
blue sky. The guardians 
of the coast are the pretty 
cottages, and here Colonel 
Woolsey R. Hopkins, a 
descendant of Moses Rogers, 
spends his summers in the 
beautiful house on the clifT. 



STAMFORD, 1641-igoo. 



219 




STAMFORD CHURCHES. 
Reproduced from Picturesque Stamford through courtesy of Gillspie Brothers, Publishers. 



220 



STAMFORD, 1641-igoo. 




TOWN HAI.I.. 

On the east shore is the large hotel and 
the bathing casino. 

In the southern part of the town the 
manufacturer finds Stamford an ideal 
place, liere are the lumber yards, the 
coal yards, factories, foundries, the most 



important o f these being 
" The Yale & Towne Manu- 
facturmg Co ;" " Davenport 
& Treacy Foundry," '' Gilles- 
pie's Lumber Yards," " Stam- 
ford Foundry Co.," the " St. 
John Wood Working Co.," 
and others. 

Stamford is justly proud 

of her public schools. The 

High School Building on 

Forest Street is a credit to 

the city. Among the private 

schools of Stamford is that 

of Miss Anna J. Webb, which 

was established in 1854. 

The Catherine Aiken School 

at Bedford Park was opened 

in 1855 by Miss Catherine 

Aiken of South Yarmouth, Mass. Over 

two thousand girls, corrting from all parts 

of the world, have been educated in this 

school. In 1838 Bett's School for Boys 

came into existence, and is still one of 

the leading private schools of the State. 




STAMFORD YACHT CLUB, SHIPPAN POINT. 



STAMFORD, 1641-igoo. 



221 



Stamford's population is over 18,000, 
and the city is a favorite summer resort. 
One of the attractions which brings many 
to Stamford is its Golf Club. 

The Hillandale Golf Club House in 
Hillandale Park, is situated on the south 
side of Rock Spring Road, amid a pic- 
turesque group of cedars, and near the 
famous "Rock Spring." During the 
golfing season the greens are a credit to 
the club. Comfortable benches painted red 
and green, the colors of the club, are at 
every tee. The club links are composed 



a short woody stretch with the high oaks 
on the right and at the left the deep, still 
pond where the peepers sing at twihght 
and the turtles bask in the mid-day sun. 
Over the hill and across a valley and the 
attractive little club house comes to view 
nestling among the cedars on the hillside. 

The Hillandale Golf Club is one of the 
United States Golf Association and with 
its large membership is a representative 
club of the country. 

Stamford's well paved streets are lighted 
by electricity. The trolley cars run over 




MRS. DEVAN'S SCHOOI. FOR YOUNG I.ADIES. 



of a succession of hills and dales, which 
bear a great resemblance to the famous 
Shinnecock course on Long Island. To 
all lovers of nature, as well as to lovers of 
the game, the beauty of the grounds must 
strongly appeal. The entrance to the 
park is shaded by a group of large trees 
to the left, where a brooklet winds its way 
over moss-covered rocks, and through 
ferns. Along a well-built road, turning in 
and out, showing the beautiful green hills 
and dales on one side and the natural 
apple orchard on the other, then entering 



hill and through valley ; the roads are 
among the finest to be found in the State ; 
the drives in the suburbs are the most 
beautiful and varied ; the old Rippowam 
River winding through the town and 
rippling on its way to the Sound is crossed 
by many handsome and expensive bridges, 
which are likely to stand for generations. 
From the hills surrounding Stamford a 
view of unsurpassing beauty is afforded. 
Palmer's Hill, on the west, is the home 
of the New York sugar king. Mr. Henry 
O. Havemeyer, from whose handsome 



222 



STAMFORD, 1641-igoo. 



residence on the sum- 
mit of the hill may be 
seen the town of Green- 
wich three miles away, 
with the Horseneck 
Church on the brow of 
Putnam's Hill of Re- 
volutionary fame. 

Long Island Sound 
stretches away to the 
right and to the left, a 
sea of dancing blue 
waves, glittering in the 
sunlight, and beyond, 
the white sand banks of 
Long Island with a 
background of lazy blue hills. 

On Richmond Hill, we find the homes 
of Hon. Samuel Fessenden, Mr. Albert 
Hatch, Mr. A. C. Hall, and Mr. David 
Bonner. 

Noroton Hill owes its beauty and most 
of its improvements to Joseph B. Hoyt, 
Oliver Hoyt afid William Hoyt, the three 




THE ARIvINGTON HOUSE. 

brothers who built their handsome resi- 
dences on this hill. Here are also the 
summer homes of Charles Stewart Smith 
and his sons Stewart W. Smith and 
Howard C. Smith. 

"Linden Lodge," the home of Com- 
modore James D. Smith, Ex-Commodore 
of the N. Y. Y. C, and " Elmwood," the 




KIvINKFEIvTER'S DAM 



STAMFORD, 1641-igoo. 



223 



summer residence of John T. Williams, 
are on Clark's Hill. Here is the Arling- 
ton House, one of Stamford's oldest and 
best summer hotels. 

Strawberry Hill is the home of James 
I. Raymond, and here lived and died, the 
historian, Rev. John Lord, D. D. 

A favorite drive on a summer day, is 
through North Street, across the Rippo- 
wam, over Hubbard's Hill, where lived 
for many years, George, John and William 
Hubbard ; then down in the valley, and 
along the river bank to Stillwater where 
stands the high chimney, being all that 
remains of Stillwater Rolling Mills. Keep- 
ing on for two miles, and then turning to 
the right down a shady lane, and the ruins 
of the " old wire mill " come to view. 

With nothing left but the dam, over 
which the water splashes and rolls, a few 
timbers, beams, and an old wheel or two, 



with only the cellar walls left, on the river 
bank, to show that once the boarding 
house for the " mill hands " stood there, 
yet, one cannot fail to weave a romance 
from the romantic surroundings, founded 
on the fact that many years ago one of 
Stamford's most honored citizens who 
was then the superintendent of the " up- 
per factory," first met the woman in this 
beautiful spot who afterwards became his 
wife. 

She was a handsome, dashing society 
girl, the daughter of an old New York 
family. With a party of young people 
from Stamford and New York, she visited 
the wire mills one summer's day, and 
there met her fate. 

In the fall of 1892, the 250th anniver- 
sary of Stamford was celebrated by the 
towns people in a patriotic and appropri- 
ate manner. 




THE FIRST SACRIFICE OF THE REVOLUTION. 

NATHAN HALE, THE PATRIOT MARTYR SPY. 



CHARLOTTE MOLYNEUX HOLLOW AY. 



IT was a glorious day in June in the 
year of our Lord 1755. The laggard 
spring of chill New England had 
succumbed to the wooing of the sun, and 
the flush of her joyousness was brightening 
the fields and hills. The bustle of Hfe 
was heard on every side ; the birds filled 
their nests with softest down, and the 
chatter of their housekeeping preparations 
was heard in every tree. 

Somewhat back from the village of 
Coventry, upon an elevated ridge, which 
gave it view of a large area of the most 
beautiful part of Connecticut, stood a sub- 
stantial building two stories in height, 
provided with many windows and sur- 
rounded with out-buildings. It had about 
it an air of immaculate respectability. 
Approaching it, one said to oneself: 
" Here dwells a righteous, God-respecting 
man." One would not have been wrong 
in reading the character of the owner 
from the aspect of his habitation. It was 
the home of Deacon Richard Hale, one 
of the foremost men of Coventry, a pillar 
of the church, a man of learning and 
strict probity, somewhat given to dog- 
matically asserting his own will, but pos- 
sessing a strong and true heart. He had 
early settled in Coventry, coming there 
from the home of his father, John Hale, 
the first minister of Beverly, Mass. 

The Hales were an excellent stock : 



Robert Hale, who arrived at Charlestown 
in 1632, was a Hale of Kent, a direct 
descendant of Nicholas at Hales, who is 
chronicled as residing at Hales Place, 
Holden, Kent, in the reign of Edward III. 
The Hales, from whom the American 
branch came, were celebrated in English 
history, but none have now more endur- 
ing laurels than those gained by the des- 
cendants of the Robert Hale who had 
come to Charlestown, and who has left in 
Massachusetts such a noble scion as Ed- 
ward Everett Hale. But it is with the 
Connecticut branch that we are con- 
cerned. Shortly after Richard Hale lo- 
cated in Coventry he fell in love with, and 
married Elizabeth Strong, a young woman 
of rare mental and physical endowment. 

On this glorious 6th of June, 1755, 
Deacon Richard Hale was diligently 
planting with his men. Ever and anon, 
however, he looked anxiously toward the 
house, and occasionally halted his work 
altogether and went into his house. 
But he quickly returned and redoubled 
his efforts, for there was a scarcity of men 
and the Deacon intended to fulfil the 
labor of two. 

The loyal colonies of his Gracious Ma- 
jesty, George the Second of England, were 
engaged in helping that regal gentleman to 
gobble up all the possessions of the French 
that he could swallow. The youth of 



224 



THE FIRST SACRIFICE OF THE REVOLUTION. 225 



New England were taking part in the four 
expeditions of that year, one of which, the 
disgraceful campaign of Nova Scotia, is 
always to be remembered because of 
Longfellow's Evangeline. Of the other 
three, there is no concern, save that in 
the expedition against Crown Point was 
the Deacon's brother, Nathan, who won 
fame in the capture of Louisburg later. 
The pursuit of glory left few to plow the 
fields ; therefore, the deacon's unceasing 
exertions. While he was bending over a 
furrow, a voice said at his elbow : " Give 
yourself a holiday for the rest of the day, 
Deacon Hale, and 
let your help rejoice, 
for this day a sixth 
son is born to you." 
The Deacon hfted 
his head. "The 
Lord be praised ! As 
you shall see, I am 
thankful for his mer- 
cies; my inen shall 
have a holiday, and 
the child shall be 
called Nathan, if his 
mother so wills." 

She did, good 
lady, she never 
opposed her hus- 
band, nor did any of 
the twelve children with whom the Lord 
gradually blessed him. He was want to 
govern them with an iron rule. As soon 
as daybreak came he was urging his men 
to greater labor. On one occasion, when 
he was loading hay upon a cart, the helper 
being rather slow, the Deacon kept calling 
out, *^ More hay, more hay ! " so repeat- 
edly and excitedly that the man, exasper- 
ated, flung up the cocks so rapidly that 
his employer was unable to place it right. 



As a consequence, it all fell down, and 
the deacon, in its midst. "What 
do you want, Deacon?" inquired 
his man. The deacon scrambled hastily 
up : '' More hay ! " he cried, as he again 
took his place upon the cart. As his 
step-daughter Alice, Nathan Hale's love, 
remarked : " There never was a man who 
worked harder for this world and the next 
than Deacon Hale." 

The household was ruled by the Bible. 
He even objected to the innocent diver- 
sion of the morris board. In order to 
prevent the children from playing it, he 




The HOUSK in which NATHAN HAI.E WAS BORN.^ 



used to allow but one light in the room ; 
this he held in his hand, but, wearied by 
his day's labor, he would soon fall asleep 
and young Nathan and his brothers, draw- 
ing close to his chair, used to play the 
game while one watched for his awaken- 
ing. 

The child Nathan was destined by his 
father for the service of the Lord. At first 
very puny, he grew robust in outdoor pur- 
suits. He had the advantage of studying 



*Some dispute this; claiming that it was erected sometime after Hale was born. 

—EJiior. 
16 



226 



THE FIRST SACRIFICE OF THE REVOLUTION. 



with the Rev. Joseph Huntington, a 
divine of rare education, who loved 
his pupil for his large gifts of mind and 
soul. At sixteen the lad entered Yale 
College, where he immediately became a 
favorite. He was actually beloved by all 
with whom he came in contact. Tall- 
madge, his classmate, who, by a singular 
fate, was the custodian of Andre, has 
written his opinion of Hale. 

Foremost in college recreations and 
studies, President Dwight and the cele- 
brated Hillhouse both bear testimony to 
his quahties. He was gay and perfectly 
unassuming, and of a simple piety which 
expressed itself in acts, not words. Grad- 
uated among the first in his class, he im- 
mediately went to teach. He was settled 
first at East Haddam, but was delighted 
when he was called to the Union Gram- 
mar School, New London. 

In a letter Sept. 24, 1744, to his uncle, 
Samuel Hale, a teacher of reputation in 
Portsmouth, N. H., Hale says : 

" My own employment is at present the 
same that you have spent your days in. I 
have a school of 52 boys, the half Latin, 
the rest English. The salary allowed me 
is 70 pounds per annum. In addition I 
have kept during the summer a morning 
school between the hours of five and 
seven, of about 20 young ladies, for which 
I have received 6s a scholar, by the 
quarter. The people with whom I live 
are free and generous ; many of them are 
gentlemen of sense and merit. They are 
desirous that I would continue and settle 
in the school and propose a considerable 
increase of wages. I am much at a loss 
whether to accept their proposals. Your 
advice in this matter, coming from an 
uncle and from a man who has spent his 
life in the business, would, I think, be the 
best I could possibly receive. A few lines 
on this subject, and also to acquaint me 



with the welfare of your family, if your 
leisure will permit, will be much to the 
satisfaction of your most dutiful nephew, 
Nathan Hale." 

This letter but modestly hints at the 
appreciation in which Hale was held by 
his pupils and their friends. Society 
then in New London was composed of 
cultivated men and women who quickly 
perceived the uncommon ability of the 
young pedagogue. His gifts of mind were 
supplemented by nature's charms : he was 
tall, five feet ten inches -, superbly pro- 
portioned, and of a graceful, dignified yet 
amiable bearing. He was fair in com- 
plexion, with large, light-blue, expressive 
eyes ; abundant brown hair, and a frank 
and engaging smile. He was rather fas- 
tidious in dress, fond of society, both of 
his own and the other sex ; quick in jest 
and conversation and a great athlete. 
" He not only," says Col. Samuel Green, 
who had been one of his pupils, " could 
put his hand upon a fence as high as his 
head and clear it easily with a bound, but 
would jump from the bottom of one 
empty hogshead over and down into a 
second and from the bottom of the second 
over and down into a third, and from the 
third over and out like a cat." This is 
but a sample of his marvelous muscular 
feats. 

The cultivation of his mental powers 
was as marked. He was an expert in 
drawing and geometry, a proficient sur- 
veyor, an ardent, scientific student, a 
skilled Latin and Greek scholar and a 
fervent devotee of the muses and polite 
literature. He was always in correspond- 
ence with his college mates and his 
friends, always engaged in some work. 
As he says in that Diary of his short life, 
" A man ought never to lose a moment's 
time. If he puts off a thing from one 
minute to the next, his reluctance is but 



THE FIRST SACRIFICE OF THE REVOLUTION, 



227 



increased." He practiced his preaching. 

Some of his letters, a portion of his 
Diary, and the address delivered to the 
Linoman Society when he was Chancellor 
in 1772, at the age of 17, are preserved. 
Chauncey M. Depew, President of the 
Society in 1855, and of whom people have 
heard wherever a newspaper finds its way, 
kindly furnished a copy of the speech to 
Stuart, author of an admirable life of Hale 
which appeared in 1856. Here are a few 
passages which demonstrate how mature 
was his intellect : 

" Under whatsoever character we con- 
sider them (the retiring members of the 
society) we have the greatest reason to 
regret their departure. As our patrons, 
we have shared their utmost care and 
vigilance in supporting Linonia's cause, 
and protecting her from the malice of her 
insulting foes. As our benefactors, we 
have partaken of their liberality, not only 
in their rich and valuable donations to our 
library, but what is still more, their ami- 
able company and conversation. But as 
our friends, what disinterested love and 
cordial affection have given us inexpress- 
ible happiness ! We have lived together, 
not as fellow-students and members of the 
same college, but as brothers and children 
of the same family ; not as superiors and 
inferiors, but rather as equals and com- 
panions. The only thing that has given 
them the pre-eminence is their superior 
knowledge in those arts and sciences 
which are here cultivated, and their 
greater skill and patience in the manage- 
ment of such affairs as concern the good 
order and regularity of the society. * * * 
" King and generous Sirs " — he con- 
cluded — " it is with the greatest reluc- 
tance that we are now all obhged to bid 
adieu to you, our dearest friends. Accept 
then our sincerest thanks, as some poor 
return for your disinterested zeal in Lino- 
nia's cause, and your unwearied efforts to 



suppress her opposers. Be assured that 
your memory will always be dear to us, that 
although hundreds of miles should inter- 
fere, you will always be attended with our 
best wishes. May Providence protect you 
in all your ways, and may you have pros- 
perity in all your undertakings." 

In his letter to his brothers, three years 
later, it will be seen how much he had ex- 
panded. 

It would seem for the superficial ob- 
server that young Hale's life at this period 
was perfectly happy. Not yet 20, master 
of a school, idolized by his pupils, and 
courted by the young and old of the town, 
there could be nothing he desired save, 
of course, that thirst for fame which 
parches every young and ambitious heart, 
made him pant for opportunity to do 
something great. It is a singular truth 
that Nathan Hale, who was to offer to the 
world one of the most sublime and heroic 
examples of man's devotion to his 
country, never in his extensive corre- 
spondence and confidence betrayed any 
longing after glory. Duty was the guiding 
star of his life, and following its guidance 
that life was sacrificed. 

But Hale had his sorrow. That it did not 
gangrene his heart is additional evidence 
of his sterling strength of character. His 
father's second wife brought to her hus- 
band several children of her first marriage. 
One of these, Alice, was remarkably beau- 
tiful, charming in person and mind. Alice 
Adams and young Nathan soon became 
attached to each other. She was the belle 
of Coventry, sincerely beloved for her 
amiabinty and true christian virtues. In 
character she was almost Hale's counter- 
part : joyous, vivacious, quick in intelli- 
gence, prompt in sympathy and thoroughly 
imbued with religious conviction. On that 
account alone she would have been a most 
fitting mate for the noble Nathan. She, 
too, was graciously dowered with beauty : 



228 



THE FIRST SACRIFICE OF THE REVOLUTION. 



in person, below the medium height, she 
was so exquisitely proportioned that even 
at the age of eighty she was the subject of 
admiration. Her features were classical in 
regularity, and the soul and mind shining 
forth from her lustrious hazel orbs re- 
deemed the coldness of the classic 
outlines. Her hair was jet black, a pro- 
fuse mass of ringlets, and her hands so 
beautiful that even her own sex raved over 



year. There are no letters extant show- 
ing how Hale bore this thwarting of his 
love ; probably his great nature prevented 
him from indulging in upbraidings of 
father or fortune. We know he did not 
suffer his interest in his favorite pursuits 
to lag. 

Mr. Ripley died Dec. 26, 1774, leaving 
his wife, then eighteen, with one child. 
Hale, now at New London, immediately 




MEMORIAI. TO NATHAN HAI,E ERECTED AT " HAI.E-SITE," HUNTINGTON, I,. I. BY 
MR. GEORGE TAYI<OR AN ENGI.ISH ADMIRER OF HAI.E. 



them. Young Nathan and his step- 
mother's daughter at once fell in love, but 
his brother John had married her sister 
Sarah and it was deemed best that there 
should be no further alliance, and while 
Nathan was teaching at East Haddam 
Alice was persuaded to marry Elijah Rip- 
ley, a merchant of Coventry, February 8, 
1773. She was then in her sixteenth 



wrote to the woman he had always loved. 
She was her own mistress now and she 
promptly decided to give herself to him 
at the expiration of her mourning. She 
returned to her step-father's roof and with 
her infant son prepared to wait for her 
soul's love. The elder Hale was what 
Connecticut would call " sot " in his ways. 
He had determined that Nathan should 



THE FIRST SACRIFICE OF THE REVOLUTION. 



229 



study for the ministry, and he judged an 
early marriage would prove a powerful 
bar to such a project. Nevertheless, he 
forebore active opposition, trusting by 
quiet disapproval to prevent the union of 
the lovers. Alice Ripley was a woman of 
a remarkably determined character. She 
had changed from child to woman, and 
she intimated to her step-father her de- 
termination not to let anything again 
intervene. But she reckoned not on 
Destiny. 

The spring of 1775 dawned full of prom- 
ise for Nathan Hale. The proprietors of 
the Union Grammar School had installed 
him in the building on Union Street. 
It was a new and substantial structure on 
the corner of Union and State where the 
the present Crocker house now rears itself. 
It was a most pretentious and commodi- 
ous building, and the young pedagogue 
might be pardoned pride in being its 
ruler. The proprietors had the highest 
esteem for him, and his profession was be- 
ginning to be very dear to him. 

New London was deeply interested in 
the events leading up to the outbreak at 
Lexington. Bold, warlike, ever impatient 
of restraint, it had openly rejoiced in the 
Boston tea party, and long ere the shot 
was fired at Lexington, had its independ- 
ent militia company under Capt. William 
Coit. It had vague premonitions, and 
when, on the 19th of April the first blow 
was struck, the whole town was quivering 
with excitement, and had a red coat ap- 
peared ill would he have fared. 

All occupation was suspended. Men, 
women and children flocked toward Mi- 
ner's Tavern where the express from Lex- 
ington, the foam still dropping from the 
jaws of his panting horse, was retailing his 
news. Men listened, but there was no 
thought of action. Every one was ab- 
sorbed in hearing. Suddenly, through 
the throng there pushed a supple and 



erect figure, for whom even grandfathers 
fell back, for there was inspired authority 
in the youthful face. It was the school 
master. He mounted a bench and began 
to speak. Gray-haired grandsires, men 
of weight and honors, heeded him as 
a leader. His words awoke a patriotic 
devotion that never died. He concluded 
his brief harangue by " Let us not lay 
down our arms until we have gained in- 
dependence ! " 

He had struck the mighty chord. Not 
concessions nor privileges nor immunities 
will satisfy us declared the inchoate mar- 
tyr. Lexington is the nucleus of a nation. 
It is not a more indulgent master, but 
freedom we demand. 

" Independence ! " cried Hale. The 
instinct inborn in every man leaped in re- 
sponse. It was a new word. They 
grasped its meaning without understand- 
ing why nor how. The very children were 
impressed, both by the utterance and the 
manner in which it was uttered. '' What 
is independence?" asked Richard Law, a 
boy who afterwards won glory in his 
country's cause. He had gone to the 
meeting clinging to his father's hand, and 
as they turned homeward, stirred by 
strange emotions, ''What is independ- 
ence, father?" asked the child. 

Hale immediately set out for Lexington 
with Capt. Coit's independent militia* 
He returned in a short time, and the 
school having assembled, bade it adieu, 
saying he felt it his duty to serve his 
country. The parting was most affecting. 
His pupils loved this lad of twenty with 
an affection that weakened not with the 
flight of time. A half century later men 
who had been his scholars could not 
mention his name without quivering lips. 
July 7, 1775, he wrote his resignation to 
the proprietors. It is a model of terse- 
ness and modesty, utterly devoid of high- 
flown sentiments, (then introduced into 



230 



THE FIRST SACRIFICE OF THE REVOLUTION. 



everything), a simple declaration that he 
thought he ought to go to the army, and 
regretting that he would put them to any 
inconvenience by leaving. 

His commission as lieutenant in the 
regiment of Col. Charles Webb was al- 
ready in his possession. This was 
stationed at New London until Septem- 
ber, when Washington demanded that all 
the regiments raised be sent to him at 
Boston. There the young lieutenant 
devoted himself with such zest and in- 
telligence to the art of war that he soon 
attracted the notice and approval of the 
Commander-in-chief. His ambition was 
to have his company thoroughly drilled 
and conversant with military manoeuvres. 
He soon had their very thoughts in uni- 
son. The wonderful magnetism of a 
noble mind captivated them and from his 
body-servant, Asher Wright, who lost his 
mind when informed of his master's fate, 
every man in the company unquestioningly 
yielded him obedience. So great was his 
influence that in November, 1775, when 
two-thirds of the inexperienced and un- 
disciplined throng whom Washington was 
endeavoring to form into soldiers 
threatened to go home. Hale went per- 
sonally through the camp. He argued 
and entreated the officers, and persuaded 
and promised the men. To his own 
company he gave up his wages, and by 
appeals to the higher nature of the 
soldiers, induced them to renew their 
enlistment. 

This service and the superiority of his 
company, for whom he had designed a 
simple 4nd serviceable uniform, and 
drawn up a code for their government, 
commended him to the Continental 
Congress, which, on January i, 1776, 
bestowed upon him the commission of 
captain. Hale had but received his 
commission when he journeyed through 
all the rigors and hard snow storms of an 
exceptionally severe winter to Coventry 



to see his father and his dear Alice. The 
former had delighted to have his son go 
to the battle for freedom. The latter was 
overjoyed to see her hero. Then he 
promised to send her letters, his diary, 
and particular accounts of everything that 
should happen. Hale gave her his 
miniature, and at length they parted, 
never to meet. 

In April 1776, the scene of operation 
was transferred from Boston to New 
York. Washington encamped on Long 
Island. It was now that Hale first tasted 
the actual business of war. Shortly after 
the American army took up its quarters 
at Brooklyn an opportunity occurred for a 
display of enterprise. The stately British 
ship Asia was up the river having under 
her convoy a sloop filled with supplies for 
the British soldiers. Hale conceived the 
bold design of capturing the sloop. He 
picked out a skiff full of choice spirits 
and on the appointed night they rowed 
across the river and hid in the shadow of 
an overhanging cliff till the moon should 
set. They were near enough to the big 
British ship to hear every movement on 
its decks and the cry of the sentinel " All's- 
well h" At length the wished-f or dark- 
ness cast its friendly pall over the river. 
Forward the skiff leaped and while the 
sentinel on the Asia's deck cried out 
" All's well," the Americans boarded the 
sloop, silently overwhelmed resistance 
and turned the nose of the vessel toward 
the American quarters. It may be taken 
for granted that its arrival was welcome,, 
and its capture rs warmly applauded. 

The following letters given in sequence 
convey an idea of Hale's employments 
during this time. Further on there are 
brief extracts from his diary : 

New York, May 30, 1776. 
Dear Brother : 

Your favor of the 9th of May, and 
another written at Norwich, I have re- 



THE FIRST SACRIFICE OF THE REVOLUTION. 



231 



ceived — the former yesterday. You 
complain of my neglecting you; I 
acknowledge it is not wholly without 
reason — at the same time I am conscious 
to have writtein to you more than once or 
twice within this half year. Perhaps my 
letters have miscarried. 

I am not on the end of Long Island, 
but in New York, encamped about one 
mile back of the city. We have been on 
the Island, and spent about three 
weeks there, but since returned. 
As to Brigades ; we spent part of 
the winter at Winter Hill in Gen'l 
Sullivan's — thence we were removed 
to Roxbury and annexed to Gen'l 
Spencer's — from thence we came to 
New York in Gen'l Heath's ; on 
our arrival we were put in Gen'l 
Lord Stirling's ; here we were com- 
bined a few days and returned to 
Gen'l Sullivan's ; on his being sent 
to the northward under Gen'l 
Thomson, Webb's regiment was 
put down j but the question being 
asked whether we had many sea- 
men, and the reply being yes, we 
were erased and another put in our 
stead. 

We have an account of the 
arrival of troops at Halifax thence * 
to proceed on their infamous 
errand to some part of America. 

Maj'r Brooks informed me last 
evening that in conversation with 
some of the frequenters at Head 
Quaters, he was told that Gen'l Washing- 
ton had received a packet from one of the 
sheriffs of the city of London in which was 
contained the Debates at large of both 
houses of Parliament — and what is more, 
the whole proceedings of the Cabinet. 
The plan of the summer's campaign in 
America is said to be communicated in 
full. Nothing has yet transpired ; but the 
prudence of our gen'l we trust will make 
advantage of the intelligence. 



Some late accounts from the north- 
ward are very unfavorable, and would be 
more so could they be depended upon. 
It is reported that a fleet has arrived in 
the River, upon the first notice of which 
our army though it prudent to break up 
the siege and retire — that in retreating 
they were attacked and routed. Number 
kiird, the sick, most of the cannon and 
stores taken. It would grieve every 




STATUK OF NATHAN HALE IN THE CAPITOL AT 
HARTFORD 



good man to consider what unnatural 
monsters we have as it were in our bowels. 
Numbers in this Colony, and likewise in 
the western part of Connecticut would be 
glad to imbrue their hands in their 
country's blood. Facts render this too 
evident to be disputed. In this city such 
as refuse to deliver up their allegiance to 
the Association have been sent to prison. 



232 



THE FIRST SACRIFICE OF THE REVOLUTION. 



New York, June 3, 1776. 
Dear Brother : 

* * * * ContinuaDce or removal 
from here depends wholly upon the 
operations of the War. 



The army is every day improving in 
discipline, and it is hoped will soon be 
able to meet the enemy at any kind of 
play. My company which at first was 
small is now increased to eighty, and 
there is a Sergeant recruiting, who, I 
hope, has got the other ten which com- 
pletes the Company. 

We are hardly able to judge as to the 
numbers of the Britith army for the sum- 
mer is to consist of — undoubtedly suffi- 
cient to cause us too much bloodshed. 

Gen'l Washington is at the Congress, 
being sent for thither to advise on 
matters of consequence. 

I had written you a complete letter in 
answer to your last, but missed the oppor- 
tunity of sending it. This will probably 
find you in Coventry — if so remember me 
to all my friends — particularly belonging 
to the family. Foget not frequently to 
visit and strongly to represent my duty 
to my grandmother Strong. Has she not 
repeatedly favored us with her tender, most 
important advice ? The natural tie is suffi- 
cient, but increased by so much goodness 
our gratitude cannot be too sensible. I 
always with respect remember Mr. Hunt- 
ington, and shall write to him if time 
admits. Pay Mr. Wright a visit for me. 
Tell him Asher is well — he has for some 
time lived with me here as a waiter. I 
am in hopes of obtaining him a furlough 
soon. Asher this moment told me that 
our brother Joseph Adams was here yes- 
terday to see me, when I happened to be 
out of the way. He is in Col. Parson's 
Regt. I intend to see him to-day, and if 



possible by exchanging to get him into 
my company. 

Yours affectionately, 

N. Hale. 
P. S. Sister Rose talked of making me 
some linen cloth similar to Brown Hol- 
land for summer wear. If she has made 
it, desire her to keep it for me. My love 
to her, the Doctor and little Joseph." 

New York, Aug. 20, 1776. 
Dear Brother : 

I have only time for a hasty letter. 
Our situation has been such for this fort- 
night or more as scare to admit of writing. 
We have daily expected an action — by 
which means, if any one was going, and 
we had letters written, orders were so 
strict for our tarrying in camp that we 
could rarely get leave to go and deliver 
them. For about 6 or 8 days the enemy 
have been expected hourly whenever the 
wind and tide in the least favored. We 
keep a particular lookout for them this 
morning. The place and manner of 
attack, time must determine. The event 
we leave to Heaven. Thanks to God ! 
we have had time for completing our 
works and receiving our reinforcements. 
The Militia of Connecticut ordered this 
way are mostly arrived. We hope under 
God, to give a good account of the 
enemy whenever they choose to make the 
least appeal. 

Last Friday night, two of our five ves- 
sels (a sloop and a schooner) made an 
attempt upon the shipping up the River. 
The night was too dark, the wind too 
slack for the attempt. The schooner 
which was intended for one of the ships 
had got by before she discovered them, 
but as Providence would have it, she ran 
across a bomb catch which she quickly 
burned. The sloop by the light of the 
former discovered the Phoenix — but 



THE FIRST SACRIFICE OF THE REVOLUTION. 



233 



rather too late — however she made shift 
to grapple her, but the wind not proving 
sufficient to bring her close alongside, or 
drive the flames immediately on board, 
the Phoenix by much difficulty got her 
clear by cutting her own rigging. Serg't 
Fosdick, who commanded the above 
sloop, and four of his hands were of my 
company. The General has been pleased 
to reward their bravery with forty dollars 
each, except the last man who quitted the 
fore sloop who had fifty. Those on board 
the schooner received the same. 

I must write to some of my other 
brothers lest you should not be at home. 
Remain 

Your friend and brother, 

N. Hale. 
Mr. Enoch Hale." 

Hale kept a diary. This diary, his 
camp book and basket came into the pos- 
session of Alice Ripley. The diary con- 
tains all the reflections of an ingenuous 
and reflective soul. It is unnecessary to 
transcribe them. Let us take the last 
brief entries that ever flowed from his 
pen : 

Aug. 2 1 St. Heavy Storm at Night. 
Much and heavy Thunder. Captain Van 
Wycke, a Lieut, and Enos. of Col. Mc- 
Dougall's Reg't killed by a Shock. Like- 
wise one man in town, belonging to a 
Militia Reg't of Connecticut. The Storm 
continued for two or three hours for the 
greatest part of which time (there) was a 
perpetual Lightning, and the sharpest I 
ever knew. 

22nd, Thursday. The enemy landed 
some troops down at the Narrows on 
Long Island. 

23rd, Friday. Enemy landed some 
more troops — News that they had 
marched up and taken Station near Flat- 
bush, their advance Gds. being on this 
side near the woods — that some of our 



Riflemen attacked and drove them back 
from their posts, burnt two stacks of hay, 
and it was thought killed some of them — 
this about 1 2 o'clock at Night. Our troops 
attacked them at their station near Flat- 
bush, routed and drove them back i^^ 
mile." 

Aug. 27, 1776, was fought the disaster- 
ous battle of Long Island. The patriots 
were compelled to fall back upon New 
York. History tells us how gloomy and 
desperate was the situation of the Ameri- 
can troops. They numbered 14,000, con- 
stantly decreasing through desertion, 
sickness, and expiration of enlistment. 
They were hungry, ragged, discontented, 
unused to soldier's life and unwilling to 
endure its privation, especially since de- 
feats held before them the prospect that 
they must inevitably succumb. 

There were noble, courageous souls 
among them, but they were unable to in- 
ject their own enthusiasm. However, had 
it not been for the example and the elo- 
quence of these men it is not improbable 
that after the Battle of Long Island the 
hungry, homesick, heart-sickened Ameri- 
cans would have lost hope altogether. 

Only sublime faith in their cause could 
have sustained Washington and his men« 
The struggling line of the Americans 
stretched from the Battery to King's 
Bridge ; opposite them in splendid con- 
dition, equipped with every munition of 
war, aided by an efficient fleet, perfect in 
discipline, lay Howe's 25,000 men, from 
the southern end of Long Island to a point 
opposite the Heights of Harlem. It was 
impossible to anticipate its next move. It 
was impossible for the American com- 
mander to defend his long line ; which 
was the most vulnerable point, where 
could he make best defence, how could 
he prevent the enemy from skirting him 
and falling upon his rear? It was Howe's 
plan to mislead Washington. How could 



234 



THE FIRST SACRIFICE OF THE REVOLUTION. 



he better prepared for the former's tac- 
tics? 

At the council of the Board of Officers, 
it was decided that some one must ascer- 
tain Howe's motives, or the American 
army was caught in a trap. And this some 
one could not be an illiterate soldier, but 
a man able to sketch plans and fortifica- 
tions, examine redoubts and circulate 
among officers. He must hazard life and 
the respect of the world. To advance a 






STATUE OF NATHAN HAI.E ON THE GROUNDS 

OF THE WADSWORTH ATHENEUM, 

HARTFORD. 

great cause he must perform a detestable 
office. He must act an unworthy part 
for the worthiest of motives : he must be 
a spy. 

" Dulce et decorum est pro patria 
mori ! " 

A timid soul can become great in face 
of a heroic death. When Col. Knowlton, 
to whom had been entrusted the duty of 



finding a volunteer, made known Wash- 
ington's want to the officers whom he had 
assembled for that purpose, there was an 
appalled silence. There were heroes 
there, but they were not sufficiently up- 
lifted from the world to put duty before 
consideration of their fate. To be hung ? 
No ! Again and again Knowlton urged 
the need. There was resentment on the 
faces of the men listening silently, when a 
clear voice said, " I will undertake it." It 
was the voice of Capt. Hale. He had just 
recovered from illness and entered the 
circle in time to give courage to the hearts 
of the commander and his council. But 
there was immediately earnest protest 
from his friends and the officers above 
him, to whom he had grown very dear. 
Gen. Hall, who was Hale's school-mate 
at Yale, has given us Hale's exact words 
in response to his persuasions : 

" I think I owe to my country the ac- 
complishment of an object so important, 
and so much desired by the Commander 
of her armies — and I know no other 
mode of obtaining the information than 
by assuming a disguise and passing into 
the enemy's camp. I am fully sensible of 
the consequences of discovery and cap- 
ture in such a situation. But for a year I 
have been attached to the army and have 
not rendered any material service, while 
receiving a compensation for which I 
make no return. Yet I am not influenced 
by the expectation of promotion or pecu- 
niary reward. I wish to be useful, and 
every kind of service necessary for the 
public good becomes honorable by being 
necessary. If the exigencies of my 
country demand a peculiar service, its 
claims to the performance of that service 
are imperious." 

Noble sentiments, which should be im- 
mortal ! What self-abnegation, what lofty 
courage, what rare grandeur of soul, what 
sublime abandonment of fear, what glori- 



THE FIRST SACRIFICE OF THE REVOLUTION. 



235 



ous reliance upon the sanctity of a holy 
purpose ! No wonder remonstrance was 
silent. 

He made all his preparations and 
quietly left the camp a few days before 
Washington retreated to Harlem Heights. 
He had with him only his faithful friend, 
Stephen Hempstead, of New London, 
with whom he journeyed to Norwalk on 
the Connecticut shore. Here, donning 
the garb of a schoolmaster, and leaving 
his valuables, save his watch and his Yale 
diploma, in Hempstead's hands, and bid- 
ding him a gay and hopeful leave, he 
jumped into the skiff that had been se- 
cured and was rowed over to the place 
called "The Cedars," near Huntington, 
on the opposite shore. Near his landing 
place was a sort of tavern kept by a Tory 
widow, Rachel Chichester. It is not 
known whether he approached this place 
on his journey to the British camp. His 
ease in his disguise let him progress fam- 
ously. The British now held New York 
and he was compelled to pass through the 
entire army. He made good use of his 
eyes and ears and skill as a draughtsman. 
The meagreness of detail leaves little 
known of his perilous sojourn, but it has 
been demonstrated that he had succeeded 
when the memorable 20th of September 
found him back at The Cedars. It was 
but daybreak. The boat he expected was 
not visible. Grown confident by his long 
immunity from suspicion, weary and cold. 
Hale boldly entered the tavern. Seated 
by the table was a man whom he did not 
observe, but who, after a scrutiny of the 
newcomer arose and left the room. There 
have been various conjectures as to the 
identity of this man, but it has never been 
revealed. Hale chatted gayly. His nat- 
ural buoyancy, his exultations at his suc- 
cess, the prospect of being with friends in 
a few hours, must have rendered him un- 
usually blithe. 



"Look," exclaimed one of the habit- 
ues, " there is a strange boat ! What can 
it be? May be an American ! " 

They all flocked to the window. Hale 
stepped out. A bend in the path hid him 
from the boat. He walked rapidly for- 
ward. It was that for which he eagerly 
worked. He came suddenly upon the 
shore. He beheld the boat and its crew. 
Instinct forced him to turn to flee. 

" Surrender, or we fire ! " 

The whole crew covered him with their 
guns. It was useless. He had been be- 
trayed. God only knows what thoughts 
surged through his soul at that moment. 

His courage and calmness on the voy- 
age back to New York won the sincere 
admiration of the captain of the British 
vessel, Halifax. He felt sorry for the 
young fellow. Under a guard Hale landed 
in New York City. That was an eventful 
2 1 St of September. A terrible fire was 
still raging. It had already burned one- 
third of the city, and the panic-stricken 
people and British soldiers were yet fight- 
ing its advance. Through all the hurry 
and excitement Hale was rudely hurried to 
Howe's headquarters. These were in the 
Beekman mansion at the corner of what 
is now Fifty-first Street and First Avenue. 

Hale was searched. From the soles of 
his shoes were drawn maps, specifications^ 
sketches and descriptions in Latin. Hale 
could have saved his life had he taken the 
oath of allegiance, offered to raise a native 
regiment for the king, or revealed the 
American situation. He scorned this. 
Nor was he actuated by the motives of 
pride and desire to be treated well which 
governed Andre. He oftered no mitiga- 
tion, made no plea for mercy. Frankly 
he stated what he was and had done. 
Without an instant's deliberation or com- 
passion Howe sentenced him to be hung 
by the neck till dead at daybreak. He 
turned back to his revelries, and Hale was 



236 



THE FIRST SACRIFICE OF THE REVOLUTION. 



led away to the provost jail down near the 
site of the present City Hall. This is said 
by several competent authorities to have 
been the place of Hale's incarceration 
that awful last night. 

Howe's order put Hale in the custody 
of Provost Marshal Cunningham, one of 
the most brutal and infamous bullies that 
ever disgraced the form of man. He de- 
lighted in torturing his prisoners. The 
Provost and the old Sugar House were 
filled with Americans whom Cunningham 
put to every indignity he could devise. 
He erected the gibbet before their wind- 
ows, paraded his negro hangmen up and 
down before their doors, and startled them 
from their brief slumbers by shouting it 
was time for them to prepare for execu- 
tion. 

To the hands of this brute was this 
grand and undaunted hero consigned. 
Cunningham pounced upon him like a 
vulture. He treated him to his worst de- 
vices. Hale asked for a bible. It was 
refused. He implored that he be unbound 
and a light and writing materials be al- 
lowed him. Cunningham refused this 
also, but a young British lieutenant moved 
by humanity interfered and he had the 
comfort of writing his farwells to his Alice 
and his parents. No one knows what 
were the outpourings of that soul, soon to 
be with its maker. 

Cunningham was so eager to wreak his 
vengeance upon his noble prisoner that 
scarcely had the first ray of light bright- 
ened night's gloom than he thrust himself 
upon his prisoner. He seized the letters, 
and, reading them, tore them in bits. He 



declared that he would not let the rebels 
know they had a man who could pen such 
thoughts. He ordered him to prepare for 
his doom. 

There were few abroad at that hour. It 
was the Sabbath morning. Hale must 
have felt this. There were a few stragg- 
lers, some country people who had been 
rendered homeless by the great fire. It 
was long before sunrise. Before Hale 
marched a file of soldiers. With manacled 
hands, clad in the white blouse edged with 
black, white cap and white trousers, (the 
garb of the condemned) he walked erect 
and fearless. Close behind him were two 
men carrying a rude coffin ; back of them 
was Richmond, the black hangman, bear- 
over his shoulders a ladder and a coil of 
rope. In the rear were Cunningham and 
a few officers and the rear guard. The 
march was short ; they halted beneath a 
large tree : the negro placed his ladder 
against a limb,climbed up and adjusted his 
halter. Hale standing upon his coffin and 
calmly surveying the operation. 

It was ready. The negro descended. 
Hale ascended the ladder. He was not 
allowed to adjust the noose. Then while 
Richmond was waiting to pull the ladder 
from beneath his feet, Cunningham, hop- 
ing to have some frenzied expression, told 
Hale to speak his last words. 

Hale's lofty glance rested upon him a 
a moment. Then in a firm voice he said, 
" I only regret that I have but one life to 
lose for my country." 

"Swing him off"! " shouted the baffled 
Cunningham, " swing him off" ! " 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



BY CHAUNCEY C. HOTCHKISS. 



CHAPTER VI. 



The De7non of Revenge. 



If iron can find the soul of man it found 
that of Cyrus Bent's as he picked 
himself from the muddy sward and fully 




FROM A ROUGH CHEST HAI.F FILI^ED 

WITH HIS EFFECTS HE DREW 

OUT A PISTOI,. 

realized the indignity to which he had 
been put, and that, too, under the eyes of 
his love. To him that moment seemed 
237 



the climax of his existence, but in fact, 
it was not, the difference being that his 
desperation was born of Janger and not of 
despair. With eyes ablaze, and controlled 
by nothing more potent than the white 
heat of hate fed by pride, he ran across 
the road, and facing the three who stood 
in mute wonder, shouted in a frenzied 
tone : " I have found him ! He's there 
— the domine — and he was helped by his 
brother ! I was beaten by treachery ! 
Go back with me — you three or any of 
you — and help me take him before he gets 
away ! Force to force — force to force ! " 
He paused for breath, his wild eyes run- 
ning from one to the other of his listeners. 

" Faith, I take it ye are a bit stumped 
an' have been manhandled ! " said one of 
them ; " Ye look as though ye had found 
the devil ! " 

" Nay ; the minister is within the house, 
I tell you ! " cried Bent, beside himself 
with eagerness. 

"Then ye had better be tellin' th' 
squire an' goin' a bit slow ! Goshermity ! 
do ye take us for three fools to follow a 
fourth an' break into th' Glebe House ? 
How came it ye staid behind ? Jest stand 
ye on one foot a minnit an' get ye yer 
wind an' yer wit ! Nobody's goin' to run 
away right off — not us anyhow ! " 

Thus abjured. Bent gasped out his 
story disjointedly enough, and with more 
or less accuracy as to detail. He calmed 



238 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



himself somewhat as he progressed, color- 
ing the story as best suited his already in- 
jured self-respect and concluding with the 
statement that to tell the squire would 
avail nothing as he had in mind that both 
glory and revenge would be denied him. 
As he proceeded a new interest held his 
hearers, their heads closing together, and 
at last, after having apparently arrived at 
an understanding, they walked slowly up 
the road, still talking, until on arriving at 
the store Bent left them. 

There was Httle doing within. Jeptha 
Beacon looked askant but said nothing as 
his disheveled clerk appeared only to pass 
through the back office and toward his 
quarters in the garret. The old man 
smiled grimly, doubtless comparing his 
own tact with his employee's lack of it ; 
for the two precepts on which the pro- 
prietor of the ' holler store ' always acted 
and which had been such factors to his 
success, enabling him to die as he had 
lived — the wealthiest merchant in Con- 
necticut, were 'molasses catches more 
flies than vinegar ' and * mind your own 
business.' 

Bent furbished himself into shape and 
returned to the store but the townsfolk on 
whom he waited that day got no more 
than monosyllables from the always taci- 
turn young man. In no way ever popular, 
he was left to chew the bitter cud of re- 
flection, save as at such times as his 



services were necessary — and his present 
thoughts were dangerous companions. 
Late in the day he saw Marcy riding 
toward the Glebe House on his recovered 
horse, and he set his white teeth into his 
nether lip until it bled. There was an 
air of impatience about him as the sun 
sank low, but this he fought against with 
some success. Three or four times during 
the afternoon he crept to the rum barrel 
and drank a stiff dram, which, beyond 
giving his black eyes an additional sparkle, 
seemed to produce no efl'ect upon him. 
As he was reheved by his fellow clerk, 
shortly after dark, he again repaired to 
his loft, stopping by the way to cut a 
dozen or more feet of small tarred line 
from one of the great loops of stuff that 
hung from a rafter. This he carried 
to his room and made into a small bundle. 
As he reached the head of the narrow stairs 
preparatory to descending he hesitated a 
moment, appeared lost in thought, then 
resolutely swung about and returned to 
his room. From a rough chest half filled 
with his effects he drew out a pistol, tested 
the flint by snapping, loaded and primed 
it, and as though afraid of himself, thrust 
it into the waistband of his breeches and 
hurried out. Ten minutes afterwards he 
stood in the old town burying ground under 
the shadow of a great hemlock close 
against the wall of the Episcopal church 
and there waited as if by appointment. 



CHAPTER VH. 

The Half-Brothers, 



Meanwhile, despite the excitement of 
the morning, matters had moved quietly 
enough in the Glebe house, the two 
brothers seeing but little of each other 



meal. The quaint kitchen was snug and 
homelike for the air had turned chilly 
with the decline of the sun, and now the 
brisk firelight, the only means of illumina- 



until they came together for the evening tion since the dishes were removed. 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



239 



danced through the apartment. From 
the spinning wheel in its corner to the 
flashing diamond panes of the dresser; 
from the snowy curtains hanging over the 
windows, to the clean, wing swept hearth 
and swung back crane, every article spoke 
of the hand of a perfect house-keeper. 
Hetty had retired to the parlor from which, 
anon, came the sound of the harpsichord 
as she sat and improvised in the desolate 
room. She had been strangely silent 
since noon. In the wood closet the valve 
was lifted ready for the minister at the 
first alarm. By the kitchen fire sat the 
deaf paralytic mumbling his pipe, gazing 
as he had been most of the day, at the 
curling smoke, while on opposite sides of 
the kitchen table sat the two brothers. 

Close together, the likeness they bore 
each other was not so strong as when 
apart, and yet the difference lay more in 
expression than in feature. The rector, 
pale and haughty, had the appearance and 
bearing of the born aristocrat, while the 
younger man, not behind his brother in 
either form or feature, showed mobility of 
countenance and an eye by far less cal- 
culating. Indeed, as he sat and scanned the 
minister by the jumping light of the fire, 
there was a look which might have been 
taken for amusement — an expression 
never seen on the face of the Reverend 
Archibald Challiss. 

" And you, as a sane man, still persist 
in sticking to an empty form. Others 
have altered the ritual ; why do you re- 
main stubborn at your own risk? " 

Thus spoke Marcy in return to some 
remark that had been made by the rector. 

" It is of small moment to me how 
others may interpret their duty ! " was the 
answer. *' I would be unworthy of my 
cloth were I to back from the position I 
have chosen ! I act on principle ! When 
I took the oath of office in England I 
swore to uphold the ritual as it exists. It 



is not for me to break faith. You cannot 
understand this thing ! " 

"■ Faith ! I cannot, indeed, I fail to 
understand how a man can be pig-headed 
over a matter that involves nothing, when 
by his stubbornness he risks his own liberty 
if not that of others. Have you thought 
of Hetty?" 

" I have thought well of my god- 
daughter. She must pass under the rod !" 
answered the minister, wearily. 

"wShe welnigh passed under it this 
morning ! " replied Marcy, slightly raising 
his voice; — "and had it not been for 
me there is strong likelihood that you, 
yourself would now be starving in yonder 
hole, for I doubt me that you could have 
opened the valve while it was backed by 
a mass of logs ! " 

" I have to thank you for it, Talbot, and 
yet — and yet it goes hard to think that 
we were rescued by one whose interests 
are traitorous. Regarding my danger 
from starvation — let me correct you. You 
know of my hiding place, but you do not 
know that it communicates directly with 
the cellar by the mere removal of a board. 
From it 1 could also reach the floor above 
and come down the back stairs to the 
cellar, and so, out of doors. This latter 
egress, however, is of little use when the 
house is full of prying men and I have 
closed the upper opening. Still we are 
under obligations to you — both Hetty 
and I." 

" In faith ! Then you have ingress and 
egress by way of your hole, to all parts of 
the house, and as freely as the rats I " 

" Precisely ; but the valve is by far the 
most convenient way ! " 

" And have you thought of the end ? " 

" I have nothing to fear. It is you who 
should walk in constant dread. I do not 
comprehend how you can range yourself 
with this movement against your king. It is 
upon that subject I wish to speak — now 



240 



THE GLEBE HOUSE, 



that we have settled regarding the legal 
papers. Will you listen ? What class do 
you represent? The lowest in the colo- 
nies ! — The peasantry of America — the 
canaille. They begin by rebelling; — it 
may end in abortive revolution ; — abor- 
tive for the reason that the cause is un- 
just j — more — ungodly, for they threaten 
to raise their hands against the rule of an 
annointed king ! And what do you ex- 
pect to accomplish ? — where get a foot- 
hold? Does not General Gage hold 
Boston ? Is he in danger save from mob 
violence ? Where are your forces ? Where 
your system? It is all wickedness — 
wickedness and madness ! For with a 
regiment of infantry the country could be 
swept from Massachusetts Bay to the 
Hudson without the loss of a man, so ter- 
rorized would be your so called patriots ! 
Have you no political foresight ? Can you 
not see that the patience of England is 
about at an end? Her armies will over- 
run the colonies, killing or imprisoning 
every rebel who denies the righteous 
authority of George the Third. And it 
were a well deserved punishment ! Shield 
yourself, Talbot, for when that day comes, 
even I cannot save you from the result 
of your folly." 

The minister had grown earnest. Marcy 
listened to this exposition of toryism with a 
curl to his lip that was not hidden by his 
small moustache. With a palpable sneer 
in both voice and manner, he retorted : 

*' Oh ! thou worthy exponent of the 
Prince of Peace ! You prated for prin- 
ciple a moment since but now you cry for 
policy ! Would you have me be false to 
myself? And are you so blind as not to 
see system all about you? What of the 
committee that has been hounding you? 
the counterpart of which is in every town ! 
What of the League? What of the ten 
thousand men now being enrolled by a 
weak congress? Moreover, the king's 



authority is everywhere denied. To 
America he is but king by name. You 
are in error, my dear brother, and your 
greatest error is in thinking that a revolu- 
tion started by the peasantry of a land — 
your so called canaille — is ever ; is ever 
unrighteous. It is a call for justice — for 
natural liberty — a protest against wrong ! 
Are they the devil's factors? This land 
belongs to those who work it — not to 
England. Its fruits should be owned by 
the toiler — not taxed into the pockets of 
another; and it is this principle, born 
naked into the world as long ago as when 
the barbarians turned upon Rome ; this 
principle which has now attained its youth 
and will grow to a giant's strength ; which 
will sweeten the ages to come. We may 
fail but you cannot force a truth to be a 
lie, batter it as you will ! We may fail, 
but martyrs have marked the track of 
progress since the days of Adam ! The 
cause of liberty, national or individual, 
will never die ! Nay ! nay ! my worthy 
brother, you waste yourself on me. We are 
worlds apart, and for God's sake ! let us 
eschew politics ! I have something in 
hand more to my taste ! " 

The minister showed his white teeth in 
a depreciatory smile as he listened, but 
he assumed his old expression as he said : 

"Well — what next, Talbot? Is the 
matter as easily pricked as the last could 
be?" 

" It is about Hetty ! " answered Marcy 
with desperate firmness, folding his arms 
and planting them on the table as he 
looked fixedly at his brother. 

"What of her?" asked the rector, 
shifting his eye. 

" You are in danger, sir — that of her, 
since she is under your roof. I made 
light enough of the matter, perhaps, but 
the young man whom I put out of this 
house was right. He is both coward and 
sneak but he was right in effect. You 



THE GLEBE HOUSE. 



241 



should surrender to the authorities — it is 
your safety ! The committee would be 
helpless in the face of mob violence, and 
from now on your house is in growing 
danger from that source. I cannot allow 
Hetty to share this risk." 

" You cannot ! " said the rector, sharply, 
stiffening himself. 

"Excuse my abruptness — but time 
wanes. I imll not ! " 

The rector's hands chnched involun- 
tarily. " And by what right of effrontery 
do you dictate to me regarding my god- 
daughter ? Do you doubt that Thaddeus 
Wain placed her under my protection? " 

" I doubt nothing ! " returned the young 
man warmly ; " but as to my right — it is 
that of an accepted lover— as you have 
long known." 

"God forbid ! " exclaimed the minister 
with something like anger in his raised 
voice as he rose from his chair. " And 
do you wish to make me beheve that 
my god-daughter is so lost to shame that 
she will renew relations with the man 
who deserted her and gave neither word 
nor sign for two years ? You who^ " 

" Stop, sir ! " cried Marcy, his face 
flushing a deep red in the firelight as he 
sprang to his feet and held up a warning 
hand. " You are a minister of the gospel. 
God grant I am not saving you from 
self-stultification ! Look at these ! " he 
almost groaned, as he threw a packet of 
letters on the tabic. " Hetty found 
these while rearranging your overturned 
desk this morning ! Archibald, deny 
nothing — admit nothing. I will give you 
the benefit of a possible doubt. Only 
this much more — for the subject demands 
brevity — your god-daughter Hetty and I 
desire to marry at once. You may gather 
something of the sweetness of her nature 
when I tell you that even now she would 
have you perform the ceremony. I have 
but three days to spare, at most." 



The rector fell back a pace and re- 
mained in a fixed attitude as though un- 
able to absorb the full import ot his 
brother's words. His fingers worked con- 
vulsively for a moment, then without 
answering, he bent forward and seized the 
packet, stripped it of the bit of string that 
held the letters together, and bent low to 
the firelight that the writing might be 
clear. In the meandme not a movement 
was made by the other occupants of the 
room, nor was a sound heard beyond the 
snapping of the logs and the rustle of the 
papers turned in the fingers of the stoop- 
ing man. For a moment the music of 
the harpsichord ceased. 

Finally the rector became erect, and 
like one weakened by a blow, spoke hesi- 
tatingly : 

" Talbot, God only knows what these 
mean to me ; — you never can. But do 
not degrade me even by thinking that I 
have a hand in this. They are doubt- 
less your letters to Hetty, but before my 
Maker, I knew nothing of their existence 
in my house or elsewhere. I swear I — " 

" How came them in your possession ? " 
demanded the younger man, coldly. 

" That is the least of it ; the plainest of 
it, to me ! " the rector returned with the 
air of a man who simply explained a fact 
regardless of its being believed or disbe- 
lieved. " — Hetty remained in Hartford 
to complete her studies. I came to 
Woodbury to preach once in two weeks, 
then returned to her. There were many 
matters demanding attention. Thaddeus 
stayed here — the Glebe house was being 
repaired. It is all plain to me. These — 
these letters were collected by him and 
forgotten; — just placed in the desk 
against our home coming — and forgotten. 
God help me ! my brother ; I know of 
no other way this could have happened ! " 

He spoke with a tremble in his voice — 
the articulation of a neiveless man 



17 



242 



MAY. 



or that of a strong one suffering from 
shock. Taking the letters loosely in his 
hands he approached the smoker by the 
fire and placing them upon the shiny, 
leather knee of the paralytic, asked coax- 
ingly : — " Thaddeus, do you remember 
these? " 

The invalid took his pipe from his 
mouth, turned the letters over and over 
in his hands, and casting a flat and bleary 
eye on the minister, answered : — 

"Aye — aye! Archibald; aye — aye! I 
e'en gave 'em to Hetty — gave 'em to 
Hetty years ago ! " 

The drooping lips had barely completed 
the halting sentence ere Talbot Marcy 
uttered an exclamation, ran around the 
table and presented his outstretched hands 
to his brother. In his generous nature 
the revulsion of feeling was total ; at that 
moment the minister might have made a 
life long friend of this impetuous and 
demonstrative young man, but the chance 
passed. There was a ring of genuine joy 



to Marcy's voice as he said : — " Archie ; I 
have sinned against you, though in thought 
only ! We were never so close as at this 
moment ! Will you forgive me ? " 

The hands stretched out weie not re- 
fused, but the chilly nature of the minis- 
ter was shown in the way he placed 
his own in the warm palms that covered 
them. He withdrew them at once with- 
out a word in reply, then turning, he 
walked slowly and unsteadily to the out- 
side door as though stricken with palsy. 

His brother watched him a moment, 
quizzically. The shght hardening of 
heart at what was almost a rebuff to his 
late affectionate demonstration made him 
blind to the evident distress of the min- 
ister, and as the rector opened the door 
and passed into the outer air, the younger 
man gathered up the letters and with a 
grim smile turned to the parlor from 
which was still heard the faint, sweet 
tinkle of the harpsichord. 

To be continued. 



MAY. 



Thou com'st to greet us soon, 

Oh, bright and blooming May ! 
So fresh thou art and sweet 

With all thy blossoms gay ! 
Yet none of us may know 

How many a rainy day 
Must darken some light heart. 

Ere thou shalt pass away. 

Sally Porter 



Law, 



THE NATHAN HALE SCHOOL HOUSE IN EAST 

HADDAM. 



BY FRANCIS H. PARKER. 



THAT Nathan Hale began the work 
of his brief and ill-fated life as a 
school teacher in East Haddam, has long 
been known to all acquainted with the 
incidents of his career prior to his enlist- 
ment into the patriot army at the out- 
break of the Revolution. Hale graduated 



of the Union Grammar School in New 
London. 

Until within a few years the interesting 
fact that the building in which Hale in- 
structed and disciplined the youth of the 
"Landing" district during these few 
months was still standing, and in such 




THE NATHAN HALK SCHOOI.-HOUSE. 



at Yale College in September, 1773, and 
late in the fall of that year was employed 
to teach in the public school in what is 
now known as the second or " Landing " 
school district in East Haddam for the 
winter term. He remained in the school 
only until the spring of 1 7 74 when he se- 
cured a much better position as teacher 

243 



condition that it might be preserved for 
many years to come, was wholly unknown 
to the general public. Hale's association 
with the building had passed from the 
minds of men, and a very few only, even 
among the people dwelling in its im- 
mediate vicinity, had knowledge of the 
historic interest it possessed. But for the 



244 



THE NATHAN HALE SCHOOL-HOUSE, 




BUST OF NATHAN HAI,E ERECTED ON 
THE SPOT WHERE THE SCHOOL- 
HOUSE STOOD IN 1773. 



increasing attention bestowed upon the 
incidents and memorials of the Revolution 
during recent years, stimulated in great 
part by the institution of many patriotic 
orders, it is probable that the Nathan 
Hale School House m East Haddam 
would soon have fallen into decay, and 
Hale's connection therewith have been 
forgotten. 

In a communication published in the 
Connecticut Valley Advertiser in the year 
1894, Judge Julius Attwood of East Had- 
dam, then and for many years before the 
owner of the building, gave its history to 
the public, and furnished indisputable 
proofs of its identity. 

When Hale came to East Haddam in 
the fall of 1773, he gathered his pupils 
about him in a low, one-story building, 
then standing upon the small triangular 



piece of land now constituting the village 
green, or park place, a short distance 
east from Chapman's Ferry, the historic 
name of the present ferry at Goodspeed's 
Landing. On the one hand the highway 
led easterly towards Town Street, and on 
the other, turned up the hill to the north 
and led on to East Haddam Landing,, 
then, and long afterwards, commonly 
called Moodus Landing. It is well to re- 
member that from its first settlement, im 
common speech and in pubhc records,. 
East Haddam was frequently called Mac- 
himoodus, later contracted to Moodus^ 
and that the present village of Moodus 
was not so named until about 1850^ 
having been before that time called Me- 
chanicsville. 

The building was originally rectangular 
in form, and similar in all essential re- 
spects to the school houses commonly 
found to as late a date as^ 1850 in East 
Haddam and other country towns, some 
of which with changes and modern im- 
provements have remained until the pres- 
ent time. Its furnishings were rude and 
simple, like those of other school houses 
of the time ; a period, it must be remem- 
bered, long before the modern ideas with 
respect to seals, desks and the proper 
number of cuW feet of air for pupils came 
into vogue. Those readers whose recol- 
lections carry them back to the country 
school house of fifty years ago or more 
will be able to fill up the picture of the 
school room where Hale presided during 
his sojourn in East Haddam". To those of 
later days, no description will make clear 
the bareness of the school rooms in which 
our great grand parents received the com- 
mon school education then, as now, re- 
quired by statute law. 

How long this building had been used 
for school purposes before Hale came to 
East Haddam does not appear, but it con- 
tinued to be used for the district school 
until 1799, when a larger and more com- 



THE NATHAN HALE SCHOOL-HOUSE. 



24. 



tnodious building became neces- 
sary. The Hale school house 
was then sold to Capt. Elijah 
Attvvood, who removed it some 
distance north to a site on the 
west side of the road to East 
Haddam Landing nearly in 
front of the present St. Ste- 
phen's church. Capt. Attwood 
built on two additions, and with 
the necessary internal changes? 
converted it into a dwelling 
house. As such it was owned 
and occupied by him and his 
descendants for an hundred 
years. During that time it shel- 
tered a domestic life at once 
modest and independent, self 
respecting and useful, and ot a 
type, fortunately still to be 
found and respected in all the 
country towns of Connecticut. 

With the recent history of the 
Nathan Hale School House the 
public has become familiar. 
After Judge Attwood had called 
attention to the historic building, 
a movement began looking to 
its preservation. Richard Henry 
Greene, Esq., of New York, a 
grandson of James Green of 
Haddam, captain of a company of 
light horse in the Revolutionary service, 
took the burden of the enterprise and 
raised the funds necessary to put the 
building in complete repair and remove 
it to a new sight. Judge Attwood helped 
along the work by giving the building to 
Mr. Greene, and William R. Goodspeed, 
Esq., of East Haddam, donated an ad- 
mirable new site for the renovated build- 
ing in his lot on the hill to the west of 
St. Stephen's church, overlooking the 
Connecticut River. Unwilling that the 
preservation of the building should de- 
pend upon any individual life, Mr. Greene 




BRONZE BUST OF NATHA.N HALE BY ENOCH S. 
WOODS, THE HARTFORD SCULPTOR. 



great 
East 



transfeired it 10 the New York Society of 
Sons of the Revolution, of which society 
he was an influential member, and the 
New York Society in turn transferred it 
to the Connecticut Society of Sons of 
the Revolution, which has assumed the 
duty of caring for and preserving this in- 
teresting object lesson in history and 
patriotism. 

To crown and complete the work, Ex- 
Governor Morgan G. Bulkeley, a native 
of East Haddam, and President of the 
Connecticut Society of Sons of the Revo- 
lution, has purchased and conveyed to 
that society the tract of land containing 
several acres surrounding the new site of 
the Nathan Hale School House, to con- 



246 



THE NATHAN HALE SCHOOL-HOUSE. 



stitute a park to be known as the Nathan 
Hale Park. It is expected that hereafter 
the annual meetings of the Connecticut 
Society of Sons of the Revolution will be 
held in this ancient school house. 

The present location of the Nathan 
Hale School House in East Haddam is a 
beautiful and conspicuous one. The cus- 
tody and care of the building has appro- 
priately passed into the hands of Connec- 
ticut men, and under favorable auspices 
it will continue to teach its lesson of 
history and patriotism to the people of 
East Haddam, and a wider circle in state 
and country for many long years to come. 

Nor has the little park where the school 
house stood in 1773 been forgotten. 
There has been placed upon it, through 
the contributions of George G. Williams, 
Morgan G. Bulkeley, Wilson C. Reynolds, 
Mrs. Luther Board man, William E. 
Nichols, Ralph B. Swan, William R. 
Goodspeed, Wilbur S. Comstock and 
other loyal citizens or sons of East 
Haddam, a bust statue of Nathan Hale, 
the work of Enoch S. Woods, the distin- 
guished Hartford sculptor, whose statue 
of Hale upon the Atheneum grounds in 



Hartford has been so much admired- 
The people of the town are to be con- 
gratulated upon the receipt of this gift of 
a beautiful specimen of the sculptor's art. 
Most fitting it is, too, that the spot about 
which memories of the patriot's sojourit 
in East Haddam center should be marked 
by an artistic and admirable memorial 
statue. 

The public ceremonies of the sixth of 
June held on the anniversary of Hale's- 
birth day, fittingly celebrated the success- 
ful accomplishment of the work of the 
patriotic and public-spirited few who de- 
termined to save the Nathan Hale School 
House in East Haddam from decay and 
destruction, and to secure its preservation 
for the sake of its historic associations 
and its inspiration to patriotism. To 
Mr. Greene above all others is the credit 
due, and it is to a kinswoman of his, Mrs. 
Hannah (Greene) Pierson, who knew 
Hale well while he was in East Haddam, 
that we are indebted for this brief but 
expressive tribute to Hale's personal 
worth : " Everybody loved him ; he was 
so sprightly, intelligent and kind, and 
withal, so handsome." 



M 


^KS^l 


%^. 




'^■W/' '^ 


pg.iii 


Bt * >ft *| 


Nt^H 


...wM 


^ism 


"§£' 



SAMUEL HUNTINGTON. 



BY SUSAN D. HUNTINGTON. 



^ ^ A MONG the phalanx of patriots 
f\ who, fearlessly and unbrokenly 
resisted the menaces and efforts of the 
British government to prevent the Declar- 
ation of Independence, it is remarkable 
to observe the great proportion that arose 
from the humble walks of life who by the 
vigour of their intellect, and unwearied 
fearlessness compensated the deficiencies 
of early education and enrolled them- 




GOVERNOR HUNTINGTON. 

selves with honor aiid capacity among 
the champions of Colonial freedom." 
Such a man was Samuel Huntington, 
signer of the Declaration of Independence 
and Governor of Connecticut. His ex- 
treme modesty and the fact that he left 
no descendants perhaps account for so 
little appreciation of the value of his ser- 
vices in these days of revival of interest 
in all things relating to the American 
Revolution. 



Samuel Huntington, great grandson of 
Simon, who came from England and was 
one of the thirty-five original proprietors 
of Norwich, was born in Windham, July 
3, 1 73 1. His father, Nathaniel, had one 
of the large families which flourished in 
New England at that time and although 
three of the sons were graduates of Yale, 
Samuel, the eldest, was *' destined to 
pursue a more humble but certain course 
of life on his father's farm. This was, no 
doubt, at that time considered an enviable 
situation ; the immediate presence of 
paternal protection and the acquisition of 
practical knowledge in an indispensable 
branch of political economy was infinitely 
more inviting than a precarious depend- 
ence upon the probable advantages which 
might result from a liberal education." 

Meanwhile he studied whenever he 
found time, borrowing books on all sub- 
jects and devouring them. He taught 
himself Latin and decided to enter upon 
a profession. Colonel Jedidiah Elderkin 
felt an interest in him and lent him books 
from his law Ubrary, so that by the time 
Mr. Huntington was twenty-eight years 
old he had given up farming and gone to 
Norwich to enter a law office. Before 
his thirtieth year had ended he had won 
distinction in his profession. Four years 
later he was made King's Attorney for 
Connecticut, but the relations between 
the Colonies and the mother country 
soon became so strained that he found his 
strong sympathies would not allow him to 
faithfully serve the king, so he resigned 
that office. 



247 



248 



SAMUEL HUNTINGTON. 



When the Town-clerk of Norwich, Ben- 
jamin Huntington, called a town-meeting 
in 1765 to learn whether the citizens 
wished him to use the stamps furnished 
by the crown in accordance with the 
Stamp Act, Samuel Huntington urged, 
and the meeting finally voted, ''that the 
clerk should proceed in his office as usual 
and the town will save him harmless from 
all damage that he may sustain thereby." 
Samuel Huntington was conservative and 
stood for loyalty to the mother country 
so long as there was hope of receiving 
justice, but when it became evident that 
there must be a division, he was outspoken 
for the rights of the colonists. At a full 
meeting of the inhabitants of Norwich in 
June, 1774, he was appointed to serve as 
chairman of a committee " to draw up 
some sentiments proper to be adopted 
and resolutions to be come into in this 
alarming crisis of affairs Relative to the 
Natural Rights and Privileges of the 
People." When this committee brought 
in its report, a vote was passed to defend 
the liberties of America and to support 
Boston and the other colonies against 
Parliament. Before the outbreak of the 
RevoluiiDn, Mr. Huntington had repre- 
sented Norwich in the Assembly, had 
been judge of the Superior Court, and 
with General Jabez Huntington and the 
Hon. Benjamin Huntington, had repre- 
sented Norwich in the Connecticut Coun- 
cil of Safety. It was curious that three 
of the original nine members of that 
council came from Norwich and that they 
were each named Huntington. 

With such a record it was not strange 
that Samuel Huntington was appointed a 
a delegate to the Continental Congress. 
With Roger Sherman, Oliver Wolcott and 
William Williams he took his seat in 1776 
and in July of that year signed the De- 
claration of Independence, his name 
standing second of the four signers from 



Connecticut. William Williams wrote at 
that time to Gen. Jabez Huntington : " If 
our assembly rechose their Delegates, I 
hope they will be guided by Wisdom and 
Providence. I must say that Mr. Sher- 
man, from his early acquaintance, his 
good sense, judgment, steadiness and in- 
flexible, integrity, has acquired much re- 
spect, and is an exceedingly valuable 
member \ and so is Mr. Huntington truly 
judicious, upright and worthy the trust. 
In spite of that awful contempt of religion 
and goodness too visible, etc., integrity an 
virtue do and will command respect. For 
my part I neither expect nor wish to re- 
main here the burden is exceeding 

great. But in this critical time the ac- 
quaintance the others have with the run 
and connection of affairs, is very useful. 
It is of great importance that whoever at- 
tend here should be men of uprightness 
and integrity, inflexibly resolved to pursue 
and serve the great cause, insensible of 
motives of ambition, interest and any 
other applause than that of a good con- 
science." 

An autograph letter of Samuel Hunting- 
ton, written in Philadelphia in August, 
1776, still exists and it shows the loyalty 
of Connecticut in those trying days. It 
says, " The affairs of the northern depart- 
ment have been heavy on my mind for 
some time, and much hath been said here 
on that subject by some of the members, 
at present things have a better prospect 
in that department, hope it may continue ; 
am glad to hear Troops are coming from 
Connecticut at this critical season, altho' 
that state hath gone so far beyond her 
proportion." In October of the same 
year he writes from Philadelphia : " Of 
late the spirit of privateering increases 
surprisingly in this place." He remained 
a member of Congress until 1780. One 
of his biographers says, " It is due to the 
history of those years, the most eventful 



SAMUEL HUNTINGTON. 



249 



in our national existence, to say that no 
member of those busy congresses was 
more marked for his dihgent or laborious 
working or for his unselfish patriotism or 
for his wise statesmanship than Mr. Hunt- 
ington. None were consulted oftener 
than he or with more confidence ; and 
none were readier to suggest or wiser to 
j)lan." 

In 1779 he was unanimously chosen 
President of Congress to succeed John 
Jay and remained the head of the nation 
for two years until his health gave out. 
He was re-elected to Congress in 1782, 
but was unable to resume his place until 
1783. In November of that year, how- 
ever, his health again obliged him to re- 
sign and he returned to Connecticut as 
simple and unassuming in character as 
when he left his native state. Mr. 
Huntington felt that he must set an 
example to counteract the spirit of 
extravagance, which had begun to 
appear. The simpHcity of his life is 
brought out in the journal of the Mar- 
quis deChastellux, who with the French 
ambassador went to visit him in 
Philadelphia and wrote, "We found 
him in his cabinet, lighted by a single 
candle. This simplicity reminded me 
of Fabricius and the Philopemens." 
Another day the Marquis dined with Mr. 
Huntington in company with several dis- 
tinguished French gentlemen and wrote, 
^' Mrs. Huntington, a good looking, lusty 
woman, but not young, did the honors of 
the table, that is to say, helped everybody 
without saying a word," probably because 
she could not say a word in French. 

This true patriot was not above calumny, 
however. Tl;ie British were ready any day 
to pay a price for his head and in an Eng- 
lish magazine for July, 1781, we find: 
" Samuel Huntington, the new President 
of the rebel congress is the son of a 
farmer. He was bred to the law and was 



poor at the breaking out of the rebellion, 
but being gifted with a smooth tongue, 
and being insinuating and deceitful, has 
become popular, and probably rich, by 
fleecing his deluded constituents." Such 
slander did not touch the incorruptible 
President. When obliged to withdraw 
from Philadelphia, his office was kept 
vacant for him two months in the hope 
that he might return to fill it. 

Soon after the family came back to 
Norwich he was appointed Chief Justice 
of the Superior Court and later Lieutenant- 
governor of the state. In 1 786 he became 
Governor of Connecticut and was annually 
re-elected for ten years, until his death. 

During this formative period of our 
history many perplexities arose. The 
year of Gov. Huntington's election Mass- 




GOVERNOR HUNTJNGTON S HOUSE. 



achusetts was stirred by Shays' Rebellion 
against the state government, and Gov. 
Bowdoin of that state appealed to Gov. 
Huntington for help. In a letter to Gov. 
Bowdoin, dated February, 1787, he 
promises to deliver up any insurgents that 
might take refuge in Connecticut in order 
to screen themselves from justice, and 
closes by saying, " From the Sentiments 
of the good people of this State I am 
satisfied that they very generally detest 
the lawless and violent courses which the 
insurgents have taken." In the Governor's 
speech to the House of Representatives 
in 1793 ^^ suggests the appointment of 



250 



SAMUEL HUNTINGTON. 



commissioners to decide upou the bound- 
ary line between Massachusetts and Con- 
necticut, hoping that it may be arranged 
with as Httle contention as possible. He 
also advises the consideration of the 
matter of appointing agents from this 
state to attend the drawing up of a treaty 
with the Western Indians " for the pur- 
pose of obtaining anything in our favor 
respecting ^?^r western lands." In 1794 
his Fast Day Proclamation states that 
national and state affairs were in a critical 
condition and begs, in face of '' the Im- 
pending danger of being involved in the 
calamities of an unprecedented and gen- 
eral war and the prevalence of Vice, 
Impiety and Irreligion," that the people 
give the day to fasting and humiliation, 
and prays that God may graciously be 
pleased to inspire the people of this state 
with " a spirit of unanimity and harmony 
and becoming zeal to promote the honor, 
interests and happiness of the State may 
bless the means of education for the pro- 
motion and increase of virtue, undefiled 

religion and useful literature, dispose 

contending nations to be at peace on just 
and reasonable terms, and fill the world 
with the knowledge and story of God, and 
all servile labor is forbidden on that day." 
In the Lenox Library of New York can 
be seen a characteristic letter of Gov. 
Huntington in manuscript recalling the 
Honorable Joseph Cooke, Esq., to his 
duty as a republican. 

Norwich, July i6th, 1787. 
Sir: 

By a letter from the Secretary of Con- 
gress of the 7th Instant I am advised that 
seven states only, are represented, and 
Congress urge the immediate attendance 
of Delegates from the State. 

David Johnson being detained at Phil- 
adelphia in Convention, it is expected 
that yourself & the Hon'''^ Mr. Mitchell, 



will give your attendance in Congress. 

I have this day wrote Mr. Mitchell on 
the Subject & expect he will set out 
without delay, if the needful money can 
be obtained, have directed him to call on 
the Treasurer and obtain monies for both 
you Gentlemen that you may go forward 
at the same time. 

Should any "unsurmotin table embarrass- 
ment prevent your attending in Congress, 
you will pledge to acquaint me of it 
without loss of time. 

With sentiments of the highest 
Respect, I am Sir 
Your humble Serv* 

S. Huntington. 
Hon'^^« Joseph S. Cooke, Esq. 

In 1795 the Governor's speech urges: 
that, as the surest way to preserve peace 
is to be prepared for war, the militia be 
provided with powder in abundance. 
The prosperity of the state near the close 
of his service to it is shown by the follow- 
ing lines from that speech : " Such is- 
present State of prosperity in Connecticut 
as affords Sufficient cause for mutual Con- 
gratulations at our present Meeting ; and 
indeed the Tranquil State of the Nation, 
the political happiness and prosperity re- 
sulting from Internal peace and amity 
with foreign powers Ought to excite our 
Sincere gratitude to the Sovereign disposer 
of all Events for the Unparalleled favours^ 
and blessings bestowed upon us. " 
Through those years of service he met 
every issue with clear judgment and un- 
impeachable integrity. His people showed, 
their appreciation by their loyalty to him. 
Of the nine hundred votes cast in Norwich 
at the election prior to his last term of 
office, he received every one. '' As gov- 
ernor of his native state he was exceeded 
in the confidence he inspired by none of 
those great men, who at different times, 
have made that office illustrious." 



SAMUEL HUNTINGTON. 



2;i 



Samuel Huntington married, in 1761, 
Martha Devotion, the daughter of his 
pastor in Windham. Having no children 
of their own, they adopted two of the 
large family of Joseph Huntington, a 
brother of Samuel and author of that 
curious, old book, *' Calvinism Improved." 

In the Lenox Library is also in manu- 
script this letter to his nephew, whom he 
afterwards adopted, while in college. 



My former letter accompanied with a 
singing book which you had requested. I 
trust you have also receiv^ 

Altho' I am much from home & may 
not receive your letters at an early period,, 
yet hope you will write by every oppor- 
tunity, your Aunt and the family receive 
much pleasure in hearing from you & by 
your Aunt the letters are forwarded to me 
wheiever I happen to be. 






TOMB OF GOVERNOR SAMUEIv HUNTINGTON IN OLD GRAVE YARD, NORWICH, CONN. 



Norwich, March 23, 1783. 
Dear Nephew 

I have receiv^ your letter of the 20th 
of February. It gives me much pleasure 
to hear you were in health & happy in 
your situation, have noted the paragraph 
in which you mention the want of money 
& delivered to your Father five pounds to 
be forwarded, as he inform*^ me he would 
soon procure a safe conveyance hope you 
have receiv^ it before this time. 



We hive repeated accounts that peace 
is like to take place among all the Bellig- 
erent powers, some late reports and 
private letters, go so far as to say it was 
actually completed the 20th of January ^: 
that all Hostilities were to close in Amer- 
ica the 20th of this month but we have 
yet receiv^' no Official accounts of this im- 
portant news from our ministers in France, 
if the intelligence be just we may expect 
a confirmation soon. 



.252 



SAMUEL HUNTINGTON. 



Friends are generally well your Aunt & 
'Sister present their love to you. 
I am with much esteem 
and affection your 
Uncle 

Sam^ Huntington. 
;Mr. Sam' Huntington 

at Dartmouth College. 

This gifted son and daughter drew 
many guests to the Governor's home, 
which was the house at Norwich Town 
now occupied by the family of the late 
Charles Young, then a stately, colonial 
mansion with tall pillars in front support- 
ing the roof. This hospitable house was 
often filled with young people and in the 
evening they used to go to the kitchen, 
where the dressers shone with pewter 
dishes and the oak floor was ready for 
dancing, and there dance until the curfew 
sounded at nine o'clock, when they dis- 
creetly retired to to their homes. 

Frances, the adopted daughter was 
married to the Rev. E. D. Griffen, D. D., 
president of Williams College. The son, 
Samuel, 3rd., after his foster father's death 
moved to Ohio, of which state he became 
governor in 1808. A letter is still in ex- 
istence describing his setting out for the 
far-distant New Connecticut, or Western 
Reserve, from Norwich Town. A neigh- 
bor wrote : ''They are going in state — 
4 Horses in Hack 4 Horses in Waggon 
and 2 Horses rode — 10 Horses all and 
15 Souls Men Women and Children. A 
few Such Families would people the whole 
reserve." He found a wild country 
to travel through and " was one evening 
attacked about two miles out of the town 
(Cleveland) by a pack of wolves and such 
was their ferocity that he broke his um- 
brella to pieces keeping them off, to which 
and the fleetness of his horse he owed his 
preservation." 

The life of this Norwich Town family 
•was extremely simple. Mrs. Huntington, 



Governor Huntington's wife, " an excel- 
lent lady possessing an amiable disposition 
and condescending manners," in her ear- 
Her married life used to take her work- 
bag on her arm and go out to spend the M 
afternoon with her neighbors, it might be I 
to drink a cup of tea with the butcher's or 
the blacksmith's wife. " In a white, short 
gown and stuff petticoat and clean, muslin 
apron, with a nicely starched cap on her 
head, she would take her knitting and go 
out by two o'clock." She was always 
ready to help the unfortunate and gladly 
gave to the poor. Mr. Huntington pre- 
ferred to wait upon himself rather than to 
call for any trivial service, although in 
those days slaves were the household 
servants in many Connecticut homes. 
After performing the duties of his office 
and helping his law students, he often 
took time to repair any garden tools or 
broken household utensils. The many 
honors that came to the family made a 
more formal style of living appropriate. 
The Norwich Packet mentioned the do- 
ings in the Governor's family and an old 
copy is still preserved which published 
this interesting item : " On Wednesday 
last, set off from this place for the city of 
Philadelphia, the lady of Samuel Hunting- 
ton, Esq., President of Congress. She 
was escorted out of town by a number of 
ladies and gentlemen of the first charac- 
ter." This setting out was doubtless the 
one that was preceded by this letter to 
Col. Wadsworth (also in manuscript at 
the Lenox library) . 

Philadelphia, November 13th 1779. 
Sir 

As I am constrain^ to tarry in Congress 
I have sent Mr. Brown the postrider with 
a Carriage to wait upon Mrs. Huntington 
to this place. 

to desire the favor of you to give 

him such aid and assistance as ycu think 



SAMUEL HUNTINGTON. 



253- 



proper to facilitate & accommodate her 
journey, your kind assistance in this 
matter shall be gratefully acknowledged 
by your esteem'^ 

and humble serv* 

Sam^ Huntington. 

P. S. You will hear before this comes 
to hand of the failure of the expedition 
in Georgia. S. H. 

Col. Wadsworth. 

Gov. Huntington was a man of formal 
manners and he had an enviable and pe- 
culiar faculty for repressing impertinences. 
He was extremely reserved but what he 
did say always carried weight. One who 
for twenty-four years had lived in his 
family said "he had never in single in- 
stance exhibited the shghtest symptom 
of anger, nor spoke one word calculated 
to wound the feelings of another or to 
injure an absent person." His courtesy 
and modesty are shown in this letter of 
introduction. (In Lenox Library.) 



Norwich 23 November 1778, 



Sir 



This will be handed by Cap*- W°^' Hub- 
bard a merchant of note in this place. 

As he is a stranger at 
Philadelphia I take the liberty to recom- 
mend him to your favorable notice as a 
gentleman of merit, a friend to his coun- 
try & a friend of mine. 

We are anxiously waiting to hear of 
^ome efficacious measures adopted "by 
Congress relative to our mediums & pre- 
-sume they are not inattentive to an object 
of such importance. 

That your Health may be preserved to 
endure the Important Service & Labours 
which you have so long patiently "borne in 
"the service & Camp or yoxir country ds^the 
earnest wish and ardent desire of 



Your most Obedient k. 
Humble Servant 

SaM^- HUN-if^'GTON'. 

President 

The love of justice was strong in Ciov. 
Huntington and as a judge he was impar- 
tial, cool, dignified and always courteous 
to other gentlemen of the bar. 

After being elevated to the highest 
civil dignity which ^t was in the power of 
the people of th^ ynited States to confer 
as President of Congress, and of the citi- 
zens of Connecticut as their chief coun- 
sellor and magistrate, this self-taught man 
was gratified by the degree of LL. D, 
conferred by both Yale and Dartmouth. 

He was a constant attendant at church 
and often took part in the prayer meet- 
ings of the old First Church at Norwich 
Town, and in the absence of the minister 
was more than once known to preach. 

Governor Huntington died in office 01^ 
January 5, 1796. A stately funeral pro- 
cession, consisting of a band, drummers 
and fifers, military companies with arms 
reversed, magistrates, aldermen, council-, 
men and clergy, followed by a concourse 
of citizens, marched from his house to 
the cemetery close by and laid him iq 
the old brick tomb which bears this single 
inscription : 

SAMUBL HUNTINGTON, ESQ , 

Governor of Connecticut 

having served his fellow citizens, 

in various important offices, 

died the 5th day of January, A. D.. 1796, 

in the 65th year of his age. 

The funeral sermon, preached by the, 
Rev. Dr. Stray "bears witness to the sin- 
cerity of his character and the uprightness 
of his life. The history of his country 
declares the wisdom of his counsel, the 
excellence of his judgment and the purity, 
of his unfailing patriotism." 




MISb GENKVIEVE HECKER. 

Miss Genevieve Hecker by defeating Miss Ruth Underbill at the Morris County- 
Links this month became champion of the Metropolitan Golf Association. Miss 
Hecker is a member of the Wee Burn Golf Club, and is, needless to say, its best woman 
player. She is not yet out of her teens, and bids fair to hold the championship for 
some time to come. She is expected to make a strong fight for the national champion- 
ship in August. 



254 



GOLF CLUBS L\ CONNECTICUT. 



BV W, D. FREER. 




OLF has taken a strong 
^ hold on Connecticut 
~ and at last a use has 



been found for many 
abandoned farms. Old 
pasture lots are used 
for links and the stonewalls serve their 
purpose in the game. In this article 
will be found an account of a good many 
clubs and they occupy much ground. The 
lands being utilized for links are increas- 
ing at an amazing rate and if the ratio 
keeps up the scientists of a few thousand 
years hence will obtain queer ideas of the 
purposes to which this state was put to in 
1900. The remains of man and his ac- 
tivities are to be found back as far as the 
miocene period and some hold that golf 
goes further back than that and the opin- 
ion is advanced that the planet Mars was 
once a great golf field and what are sup- 
posed to be the banks of canals are but 
the hazards for the ancient game. 

There are various ways to account for 
the popularity of the game. Those 
who play are supposed to wear suits 
that are pretty and there is a wide 
field for taste. It is one of the games 
that is interesting to see even if the 
onlooker is unfamiliar with all of the 
points of the game. There is much 
activity in it and there is but little 
sameness. As it is played out of 
doors and as the age is an athletic one 
it affords a fine opportunity for 
women who are fond of exercise. This 
may account for some of its popularity. 



Thirty years ago croquet was the only 
inducement for girls to venture in outdoor 
games. The art of sledging had not been 
advanced to tobogganing and there was 
not much of a field for sportswomen. But 
women have had the inclination since the 
times of Bess of Hardwick, who could 
carry a 60-pound Cheshire cheese on her 
head. 

As all who play are enthusiastic over 
the game it must be something more than 
a fad. If more proof is needed notice the 
space that this magazine gives up to it and 
calculate the time that I have spent upon 
it. Below will be found an account of a 
large number of the most important clubs 
in the State. 



WEE BURN GOLF CLUB. 

THE Wee Burn Golf Club of Norton 
is one of the best known clubs 
along the Sound, and will be the subject 
of particular interest this summer, as the 




CLUB-HOUSE WEE BURN GOLK CLUB. 



255 



256 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT, 



tournament for the championship of Con- 
necticut is to be played on its links early 
in June. The course is over a picturesque 
stretch of ground on the old Boston Post 
road. It is admirably situated, as it has 
all the quaint associations and scenery of 
a country village, and is at the same time 
within easy reach of the business center 
of Stamford. Across the road from the 
links, on the top of a high knoll, from 
which a view of nearly the entire course 
may be obtained is the club house, which 




CHARIvKS H. SKEI<Y, I.ISADING PI^AYER 
WEE BURN GOI.F CLUB, WAS RUNNER ON 
IN STATE CHAMPIONSHIP CONTEST. 

is an attractive model of colonial archi- 
tecture. These things are all very nice, 
but it is not to them alone, however, that 
Wee Burn owes its distinction in the golf- 
ing world. It is the quality of its links 
from a playing viewpoint that so com- 
mends it to golfers, and has made it such 
a thriving, vigorous club. It is a nine 
hole course, the total length being 2,800 
yards. The ground is of a character 
adapted for golfing, and has been given 
very careful attention, so that it is 



now in excellent trim. This spring some 
obstructions such as trees, have been re- 
moved, and a couple of greens, which 
were not up to the standard, have been 
improved. Last fall such players as. 
Findlay Douglas and C. M. Hamilton 
spoke in high terms of it and this year it 
will be found to be in better shape than 
it was last. This will be welcome informa- 
tion for the clubs throughout the state, 
owing to the championship meet being 
held on these links. The tournament 
commences Wednesday, June 6, and con- 
cludes the following Saturday. 

The Wee Burn Golf Club was organized 
in the spring of 1897. The chief movers 
in founding the club were Edward E. 
Buggerhof, John D. Crimmins, Archibald 
H. Smith, A. Floyd Delafield, and Wilson 
L. Baldwin. About 30 acres of land 
were procured for links from George 
Stranward, F. S. Fitch 'and Mrs. Charlotte 
F. Callender. The club grew rapidly. 
It was but a short time until the member- 
ship limit, at first determined upon, had 
been reached, and it was extended to 125 
members. There is now a full member- 
ship. The first two years the bulk 
of attention was given to improving the 
course, but, last year, an important step 
forward was taken by the erection of a 
new club house. The opening of the new- 
house, last fall, was marked by the holding 
of an open tournament, in which most of' 
the prominent golfers of the M. S. A.. 
took part. The club has several ex- 
cellent golfers on its rolls. Among 
them are C. H. Seely, who has dis- 
tinguished himself in many open tour- 
naments, George and Fred Hecker, 
Harvey L. Williams, W. L. Baldwin, W.. 
B. Wheeler, A. C. Wheeler and A. S. Pitt. 
The last few years it has been represented 
by a team which can hold its own witb 
most others. The club has also 
developed some good women golfers.. 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



257 



Chief among these are the woman cham- 
pion or the club, Miss Genevieve Hecker, 
who showed up well in the national 
women's championship at Philadelphia, 
last year. The present officers of the 
club are : President, John D. Crimmins ; 
Vice-President, Charles Stewart Smith ; 
Secretary, Harry F. Devens ; Treasurer, 
Wilson L. Baldwin ; Captain, Alfred S. 
Pitt. 



Charles Francis Deau ; treasurer. Dr. 
James Albert Meek ; secretary, Joseph 
R. Swan ; captain, Edward Leavitt. 



HILLANDALE GOLF CLUB. 



HE Hillandale 
Golf Club has 
attractive links 
in the vicinity 
o f Strawberry 
Hill at Stam- 
ford. It is a 
nine hole course 
which runs, as 
the name would 
indicate, over 
hill and dale. 
The member- 
ship is confined 
for the most part to Stamford people. 

About the best known player belonging 
to the club is Edward Leavitt, who was 
proficient at the game long before it 
gained its present popularity. The links 
are near Mr. Leavitt's residence and he 
has devoted much of his time recently to 
attending to them. As a result they are 
now in first-class shape. 

The officers of the club are as follows : 
President, Frank Phelps ; vice-president. 






EDWARD I^EAVITT, CAPTAIN HII,I,ANDAI.E CIvUB. 



NINTH TEE HII^LANDALE GOLF CLUB. 

The club will boast of a course this 
season of more than ordinary merit. It 
has been lengthened and improved to such 
an extent under the direction of Edward 
Leavitt, captain of the club, that it is 
practically a new course, and one which 
will hardly be equalled by any nine-hole 
course in the metropolitan district, not 
excepting even Oakland, which is ranked 
among the best nine-hole courses in the 
country. Its natural advantages are al- 
most unequalled. The turf, which is a 
distinct feature, is firm but springy, and 
of a rich, thick texture, which practically 
insures a good lie from a well-hit ball on 
any part of the fair green. The contour 
of the country is also favorable for golf 
links, and natural hazards have been made 
such good use of that 
artificial hazards have only 
been found necessary in 
playing to three holes. 
The greatest care has also 
been used in arranging 
the distances of the vari- 
ous holes and the hazards, 
so that perfect play re- 
ceives its full reward, as 
to every hole the distances 
require a full drive or 
the multiple thereof, or 



18 



^5^ 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



else a hazard is so placed 
that a poor shot is punished 
by the loss of a stroke. There 
are no holes which are a drive 
and a half or two drives and 
a half, offering chances for 
the bungler to retrieve him- 
self. 

Last year the course was 
only 2,434 yards long. It 
has now been lengthened 417 
yards, making the total play- 
ing distance 2,851 yards. 
There will be absolutely no 
local rules, as none is neces- 
sary, which is a good feature, and a man 
is forced to keep straight, as there is 
hardly a hole where a sliced or pulled ball 
is not severely punished. One glance 
over the links leaves a good impression. 
Every hole offers some new and attrac- 
tive feature, and there are one or two 
holes sporty enough to satisfy the most 
enthusiastic player. The arrangement of 
the holes, with names, distances, and 
bogey, is as follows : 




No. 
I. 


Name. 

The Arches, . . . 


Distance. 
210 


Bogey 
4 


2. 


The Oaks, . . . 


209 


4 


3- 
4- 

5- 
6. 


Rock Spring, . . 
The Maples, . . . 
The Roadway, . . 
The Moorlands, 


435 
145 
587 


4 
5 
3 
6 


7- 
8. 


Hillandale, . . . 
Pike's Peak, . . . 


385 
350 


5 
5 


9- 


The Cedars, . . . 


. 215 


4 



A VIEW OF THE GROUNDS HII.I.ANDAI.B CI.UB. 



the regulation two more for a bogey, four 
in each case. The second green, on the 
top of a ledge overlooking Rock Spring, 
is nicely situated. A low bunker and 
sand-pit at the back will punish an over- 
approach. The tee for the third hole is 
to the left of the club-house, and an ac- 
curate tee shot is necessary to avoid 
clumps of trees on each side. The play 
is then over rolling country to a punch- 
bowl green with little trouble if one keeps 
straight. The next, 435 yards, calls for 
careful play. The drive is from the top 
of a knoll from where a bird's-eye view of 
five holes can be seen. A road punishes 
a poor second. The fifth is the short 
hole, only 145 yards, for which the bogey is 



Total, . 



2,851 



40 



The first two holes are by themselves to 
the right of the club-house. They run 
parallel to each other, and are practically 
the same. A bunker runs across the line 
of play to both holes no yards from each 
tee, which must be driven. A mashie ap- 
proach should then find the green with 




CI.UB HOUSE, HII,I.ANDAI.E CI.UB. 

three, and then comes the longest hole on 
the course and one of the longest in the 
country, 587 yards. A road in front of 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



259 




MISS GERTRUDB I^KAVlTT, CHAMPION I.ADY 
PI^AYER, HII,I,ANDAI.K CI^UB, 

the tee punishes a topped ball, while a 
bunker 300 yards from the tee traps a 
poor second. The green is rolling, on a 
little knolj, and those who record a six 
will probably be in the minority most of 
the season. 

The seventh, Hillandale, 385 yards, is 
one of the most attractive of the nine. 
The drive is from the same knoll as the 
fourth hole, only in the opposite direction. 
A road 150 yards from the tee must be 
driven, while a brassey should be within a 
mashie approach of the green, which is 
nestled down at the side of a thick woods 
with a road behind it. The eighth is the 
sportiest hole on the course, and different 
from any in the country. The drive is 
over a road and two stone walls to the 
foot of a ledge 200 yards from the tee. 
This ledge is forty or fifty feet high, and 
the second shot must be up over this hill 
bunker at right angles to the drive, to a 



punch-bowl green lying between a 
clump of trees and a road. Bogey is 
five, par is four, and eight will not be 
unusual. In facing the home hole, a 
rock bunker fifty yards from the tee 
threatens danger to a poor drive. Well 
away, however, it is plain sailing to the 
green for a bogey four. Woods on 
each side of the fair green, however, 
demands straight play. The turf 
here is the finest on the course, as a 
player could run up to the green with 
a putter from almost any distance. 
The roads, which are referred to as 
hazards, are all private. 

A cosey little club-house, built last 
fall, overlooks the course and is sur- 
rounded by a clump of cedars. On 
the main floor is a large reception 
hall with big, open fireplaces, back of 
which is the dining room. The 
women's locker-room and parlor are 
up stairs, while down stairs are the 
men's locker-room and workshop, 
where Tom Gourlay, the well-known pro- 
fessional, holds sway. Gourlay has just 
been engaged by the club, and a better 
man could hardly have been found, as he 
is a good club-maker, teacher, and green- 
keeper. 

From the Neio York Post, Mar. 9th. 



HARTFORD GOLF CLUB. 

THE Hartford Golf Club is building a 
magnificent club-house and is to 
invest $60,000 in its new property. Its 
new course is of 18 holes and is excellent 
in nearly every respect. The member- 
ship is now close to 350. The showing 
the team made against the strong Vale 
club in April gives an idea of what good 
material there is in the club. 

The new club-house is to have facilities 
for luxurious dining and for conveniences 
that will be excelled bv but few clubs in 



26o 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



the country. And there will be tennis 
courts and a bridle path for horseback 
riders. Located near the beautiful EHza- 
beth Park the scenery is unsurpassed. 




F. R. COOI.EY, CAPTAIN HARTFORD CI.UB. 

Among the best players are F. R. 
Cooley, R. W. Cutler, H. S. Redfield, 
Alex Bunce, J. C. Stirling, D. L. Schwartz, 
E. K. Mitchell and W. F. Whitmore. 
Miss Ruth Whitmore, whose portrait is 
given, has played three years, is a scratch 
player, and plays the men's course in 95. 




RAI,PH W. CUTI^ER, PRESIDENT HARTFORD 
GOI.F CI<UB. 

Miss Whitmore is the possessor of the 
Bachelors' Cup put up in the ladies' 
handicap tournament in 1896. She won 
it three times, entitling her to hold it. 
Games were won in contesting for the cup 



as follows : Miss M. S. Robinson i. Miss 
A. N. Bennett 2, Miss G. O. Lewis 2, 
Mrs. R. B. Riggs 2, Miss C. E. Cutler 2, 
Miss M. B. Bald 2, Miss C. L. Howard 2. 
Miss Whitmore hopes to enter the inter- 
ternational tournament at Shinnecock, 
L. L, this fall. 

The team matches pla}ed by the Hart- 
ford Golf Club last year resulted as fol- 
lows : 




MISS RUTH WHITMORE, WINNER OF THE 
BACHEIvORS' CUP. 



WHERE PLAYED. 



May 
June 

Sept. 

Oct. 

Nov. 



1-] Hartford 8, Orford 6 So. M'uchest'r 



i6, Arawana 5 

31. " 2 

20, Norwich i 

3«, Sp'gfield o 

20, " I 
4.1, Arawana o 
26, Waterb'ryy 

21, Otford I 
17, Waterb'r5'4 
13, N'w H'v'n 

C'tryCl'b 11 

38 



Middletown 

Hartford 

Norwich 

Hartford 

Springfield 

Hartford 



Waterbury 
New Haven 



251 



The club was organized in 1896 and re- 
organized February 27, 1900. The pres- 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



261 




CIvUB HOUSK, HARTFORD GOI,F CI.UB. 



€nt officers are : President, Ralph W. 
Cutler; Captain, Francis R. Cooley; 
Secretary, William A. Sanborn ; Treasurer, 
John J. Nairn ; Board of Directors, the 
above officers and J. C. Stirling, J. M. 
Taylor, E. B. Hooker, J. O. Enders and 
C. P. Howard ; Green Committee, Francis 
R. Cooley, J. Carolus Stirling, Charles P. 
Howard and Charles E. Shepard ; Mem- 
bership Committee, Dr. P. H. Ingalls, 
John S. Camp, Miss Mary Bulkeley and 
Miss Mary S. Robinson ; Entertainment 
Committee, Mrs. Edward B. Hooker, 
Mrs. John M. Taylor, Mrs. W. M. Storrs, 
Mrs. Robert H. Chapman, Mrs. Lewis D. 
Parker and Miss Ruth Whitmore ; Audit- 
ing Committee^ William P. Conklin and 
Edward S. Pegram ; Prize Committee, 
Miss Ruth Whitmore and Harold G. 
Holcombe. 

The non-resident members are Miss 
Mary E. Beach of West Hartford, John 
J. Corning of New York, Clive Day of 
New Haven, Franklin D. Glazier of South 
Olastonbury, Mrs. Franklin D. Glazier of 
South Glastonbury, Miss Estelle Leth- 
bridge of Orange, N. J., H. C. Nickerson 
of New York and Charles G. Smith of 
New York. The honorary members are 
James J. Goodwin, W. W. Huntington 
and Mrs. W. W. Huntington. 



NEW HAVEN GOLF CLUB. 

IN the history of sport in New Haven 
never, perhaps, has any game become 
so widely popular so rapidly after its in- 
troduction as golf. It has easily taken 
the lead over all other pastimes with the 
average public and its growth in the five 
years it has been played has been wonder- 
ful. At present there are three golfing 
organizations in New Haven and they are 
making important arrangements for the 
furthering of interest in the game. The 
clubs are the New Haven Golf, the New 
Haven Country and the Yale Golf. 

The pioneer in the field of golf was the 
New Haven Golf Club which was organ- 
ized in 1895. It was incorporated at 
Hartford a year ago. 

The start of this organization was the 
outcome of peculiar circumstances. In 
the fall of 1894 when the century- old 
pastime of the Scotch was becoming a 
fad in this country the game was the 
chief topic of conversation among the 
members of the New Haven Lawn Club, 
then the leading pleasure-social organiza- 
tion of the city. Agitation for a links 
resulted in a committee, having for its 
members J. S. Hotchkiss, Joseph T. 
Whittlesey, William Beebe, John W. 



262 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT, 



Bristol and Prof. T. S. Woolsey, being 
elected to look into the project of intro- 
ducing golf as one of the amusements of 
the Lawn club. These gentlemen imme- 
diately set about finding a suitable site 
for a course and while thus engaged 
deemed it best to keep the golf organiza- 
tion separate from the Lawn club. Ac- 
cordingly the New Haven Golf Club was 
organized in 1895 ^^^^ ^^^ above named 
committee acting as executive committee. 
Mr. Whittelsy was elected president and 
Mr. Bristol named as treasurer. Links 
were laid out on a large stretch of land on 
the beautiful Prospect street hilly emi- 
nences amid the most healthful surround- 
ings. The club started with a member- 





CI<UB house;, new HAVICN (tOI^F CI.UB. 

ship of 150 which has since increased to 
double that number which is the member- 
ship limit. The size of the present waiting 
list indicates that a large number of new 
members will be added shortly. Yale 
students at present make up the majority 
of the members but among business men 
and their families new recruits are being 
daily added. That the golf craze is at its 
height and even increasing cannot be 
doubted from the interest being shown 
in the pastime in New Haven just at 
present and especially in the old club. 

The course of the New Haven club is 
about two miles distant from the railway 
station, trolley cars shortening the dis- 



to a 25 minute ride. The first nine holes 
were laid out in 1895 by Robert D. Pryde, 
a son of Scotland, who has since been 
the greenkeeper. Last fall an additional 
60 acres was purchased and the course is 
now being made to consist of 18 holes. 
This move will be a great improvement 
as the distance between several of the 
holes will shortly permit of drives of 500 
yards. This will make distance another 
strong point of the course. 

The original course has maintained a 

reputation far and wide for its peculiar 

excellence. In speaking of the greens 

while here on a visit in April, Harry 

Vardon, the English open champion, said, 

'' Thus far they are the best I have seen 

m America and those over which I 

played in Florida do not at all 

equal them." Since its course was 

completed the New Haven Golf 

Club grounds have been the haunt 

of all Yale undergraduates who are 

inclined toward golf and here have 

been developed some of the finest 

amateur players in the country. 

; No other club can approach the 

J record of the pioneer Elm City 

organization in rounding out star 

performers. Since the formation of 

the intercollegiate league, Yale has had 

her team on the Prospect Hill course for 

practice and thus far they are the leaders 

of college golfers. Recently Yale's 

representatives won out from Princeton 

and Columbia's men at Lawrence Harbor, 

New Jersey. 

W. Rossiter Betts, Yale '99, who was 
runner-up at the national amateur cham- 
pionships in Chicago in '96 acquired his 
earhest knowledge of golf at the New 
Haven grounds. Last year Walter B. 
Smith, another Yalensian, after three 
years practice over the links was runner- 
up against Plndlay S. Douglas at the 
Morristown, N. J., tournament. Harry 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



263 



Vardon is of the opinion that it would be 
hard to find a course which offers more 
possibilities for the development of golf 
and it is true that indications point to a 
future for the organization which would 
be hard to duplicate. 

The present officers of the New Haven 
Golf Club, all of whom with one exception 
are Yale men, make up a board which 
manages the organization and are as 
follows: Joseph T. Whittelsy, 67s; Dr. 
Frederick L. Chase, 91s of the Yale 
Observatory ; Arthur L. Wheeler, 93, 
James E. English, and the undergraduate 
representatives, F. C. Havemeyer, 1900, 
and T. M. Robertson, 1901, captain of 
the Yale golf team. 



NEW HAVEN COUNTRY CLUB. 

N 1898 the 
New Hav- 
en Coun- 
try Club 
was o r - 
ganized 
and is to- 
day the 
leading 
social or- 
ganization of the city. On an island 
in Lake Whitney, two miles distant 
from the center of the city, (a ten minute 
ride by trolley) is situated the picturesque 
grounds of the organization. In the ac- 
quiring of the property and the laying out 
of the eighteen hole course a large sum of 




money was expended. To complete the 
charming pleasure resort a handsome 
stone clubhouse, costing $20,000, was 
erected last fall. The architecture of the 




SUSPENSION BRIDGE AND VIEW OF NEW 

HAVEN COUNTRY CI.UB-HOUSE AND 

GROUNDS. 

structure is of the Old English pattern 
similar to the clubhouses on the courses 
in England and Scotland. The building 





NEW HAVEN COUNTRY CI,UB, VIEW FROM 3RD TEE. 



ROBERT SHIEI.DS, COACH. 

is entirely ot stone and is low and 
rambling. A restaurant famous for its 
excellence i s maintained 
the year round for the con- 
venience of the members. 
In the clubhouse, far from 
the noise and bustle of 
the city, many o f the 
largest social entertainments 
of the smart set are held. 
A spacious dancing hall, 
retiring rooms for the ladies 
and gentlemen and sleeping 
apartments coniplete the 
modern ideas in the con- 
struction of the house. 



264 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 




CIvUB HOUSK, NKW HAVEN COUNTRY CLUB. 

The course stretched out over a large 
and beautiful countryside area is one that 
is much sought after and admired by 
golfers throughout the state. The most 
painstaking care was observed in its 
arrangement and neither money nor time 
were spared to make it meet the almost 
ideal requirements of the club members. 

At present the membership touches 
450, with a large waiting list on the club 
books. One of the features of the archi- 
tecture of the grounds is the foot suspen- 
sion bridge, constructed entirely of iron, 
extending from the Lake Whitney shores 



over the surface to the club grounds. A 
golf course amid more perfect environ- 
ments could not be imagined. Ever 
since the day it opened money has been 
spent in constantly improving the grounds 
and course and the expenditures have 
been duly rewarded. 

Every day is a gala one at the links 
and tournaments between members and 
also between the club and visiting teams 
are in progress throughout the season. 
Mr. Henderson, the steward, has charge 
of the grounds and clubhouse. 

The officers of the New Haven Coun- 
try Club are : President, Henry L. 
Hotchkiss ; Vice-President, General E. E. 
Bradley ; Secretary and Treasurer, George 
S. Barnum. Mr. Barnum is at present 
engaged in getting up a book of the 
Country Club. 



YALE GOLF CLUB. 

THE Yale Golf Club is composed of 
200 undergraduates who use the 
New Haven Golf and also the Country 



ISHoU Cmirt* . 



New Haven C'unir yC.-'.h 
Diaqrgrn c/ 
la Hole Ci^rs-. 




PlyAN OF COURSE, NEW HAVEN COUNTRY CLUB. 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



265 



Club grounds. There has been some 
talk of securing a private course but it is 
not probable that such a move will be 
made before next year. 

Vardon's visit together with the natural 
and expected growth of the game have 
had the causes of the fine innings golf is 
now enjoying at Yale. 

T. M.Robertson, 1901, of New York 
City is president of the Yale Golf Club. 



STAFFORD COUNTRY CLUB. 

WITH undulating land and natural 
hazards of brooks, marshes and 
sand pits the Stafford Springs Country 
Club is very fortunate in having a good 
course- The club was organized in the 




I 



:e. h. pinney, captain G01.F tkam 
1898-1899. 

spring of 1898 and the links were pre- 
pared under the direction of John Ship- 
pen, the professional player from the 
Shinnecock Hills Golf Club. The club- 
house commands a view of the course and 
there are piazzas on three sides. It has 
a living-room, refreshment room, lockers 
for men and women and an old fireplace 
in one of the rooms gives it a very com- 
fortable appearance. 

The links are about one mile from the 
village and the surrounding country is 






CI.UB-HOUSE, STAFFORD SPRINGS COUNTRY 
CIvUB. 

very picturesque. A pretty brook runs 
through the club property and there are 




MISS MARY CONVERSE, WINNER WOMEN'S 
TOURNAMENT, SEASON OF 1 899. 

tennis courts and other forms of sport and 
recreation. The club was opened July 4, 




MISS CI.ARA KINGST.EV HAKKR, PLAYER 
IN THE FINAI.S (women's TOURNA- 
MENT SEASON 1899 ) 



266 



GOLF CLUBS LN CONNECTICUT. 




CHRISTOPHER ALLEN, PRESIDENT STAF- 
FORD COUNTRY CLUB. 

1898, by a match with Rockville players, 
and the club has had matches with Nor- 
wich club experts. Last summer the 
club sent players to the State tournament 
and Dr. L. F. Eaton qualified among the 
sixteen. Last fall a cup was presented 
by Christoph Allen to be played for at 
the fall tournaments by members of the 
club. Dr. Eaton won it in the first tourna- 
ment and it is to be won three times be- 
fore it can become the property of any 
member. 

For the ladies in the club special enter- 
tainments are provided Saturdays during 
the season. The club has in its member- 
ship many of the officials of the big 
woolen mills at Stafibrd Springs and it has 
a number of non-resident members in 
New York, Boston and Hartford. The club 




has about 180 members and the officers 
are : President, Christopher Allen, of th6 
Phoenix Woolen Company ; Vice-Presi- 
dent, J. H. Valentine, of the Warren 
Woolen Company ; Secretary, J. Carl 
Converse ; Treasurer, B. P. Cooley, of 
Smith & Cooley. 

The team for 1900 will probably be se- 
lected from the following players : Dr. L. 
F. Eaton, J. H. Valentine, E. H. Pinney, 
Charles B. Pinney, Claud C. Pinney, F. G. 
Sanford, Richard M. Fisk and J. Carl 
Converse. 




A PICTURESQUE CORNER, STAFFORD 
SPRINGS GOLF CLUB. 

The best women players are Miss Mary- 
Converse, Miss Clare Kingsiey Baker,. 
Mrs. E. H. Pinney, Miss Gertrude L But- 
terfield and Mrs. Lewis McLaughlin. 



DR. L. F. EATON, WINNER OF THE ALLEN 
CUP AND CLUB CHAMPION SEASON 1899. 



FENWICK GOLF CLUB. 

NEAR the shrine of T-ady Fenwick 
the golf players have their links. 
The Fenwick .Golf Club has been in ex- 
istence four years and it has members 
from about every section of the United 
States. Mr. Pemberton of London, who 
has frequently played there, says that the 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



267 



ground comes nearer to the great courses 
of England and Scotland than any he has 
seen in this country. This is high praise 
as the best are supposed to be in the 
kingdom of Great Britain. 

It is certainly an ideal spot that the 
club has chosen for its links for it has 
water on three sides and a fine breeze is 
constantly blowing about. With the Sound 
on one side and the River on another and 
the cove bending in on the north the club 
members are sometimes undecided 
whether to play golf or go fishing. In the 
two last years gol£ has been very popular 




EX-GOVERNOR MORGAN G. BUI,KEI<1,Y, 
FENWICK GOIvF ClyUB. 

among the guests at the Ferwick Hall and 
it has to a large extent superseded bath- 
ing. When the followers of Neptune are 
becoming fickle it is an indication that 
golf is taking a strong hold on the young 
men and women in this country. 

One of the most enthusiastic golfers in 
the Fenwick club is Governor Morgan G. 
Bulkeley. He plays very well, too, and 
spends much of his spare time at the links 
during the hot season. But he is not as 
good a player as is Morgan G. Bulkeley, 
Jr., who has arrived at the tender age of 
16, and bids fair to beat all the club play- 
ers. He has done remarkable work for 



one of his age and there are few in the 
club who can cope with him. 

The first teeing ground is near Fen- 
wick Hall, the course is west about a half 
mile, it then goes back past the hotel and 
swings around until it strikes some other 
place. Some of the hazards are the won- 
derful country roads that have been built 
along the river and sound and are made 
of vast quantities of sand, four times as 
much as are necessary, with a variety of 
cacti along the sides. If this was not 
enough sand dunes have been built, 
ditches have been dug and partly filled 
with sand and there are artificial bunkers. 

Play begins about May ist and extends 
into November. James B. Moore of 
Hartford, who passes the winter in Flor- 
ida, is president of the club, and M. B. 
Brainard of Yale, a son of ex- Mayor 
Brainard of Hartford, is secretary and 
treasurer. Among the best players are 
Colonel H. S- Redfield, Frank Cooley, 
Dr. W. D. Morgan, Colonel W. E. A. 
Bulkeley, president of the Beefsteak Club, 
R. G. Irwin, the manager of the Plant in- 
terests, and M. G. Bulkeley, Jr. The club 
has about 60 members and it is looking 
forward to a big season. 



THE NORFOLK DOWNS. 

FOUR years ago last August our golf- 
lovers were wishing Norfolk could 
have the one thing lacking to make it an 
ideal summering place — a first-class links. 
Little did they think that even then plans 
for introducing this good old game among 
the features of our village were taking 
shape in the minds of two of its residents. 
But such was the case and before many 
weeks had passed the plans were finished. 
Whereupon a large tract of land about a 
mile from the library was bought and the 
work of laying out a course was begun. 



568 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



This work under the excellent supervision 
of Dr. A. E. Cobb was completed in less 
than a year, and the course at once opened 
to players. Since then the downs have 
been improved from time to time until 
now they are regarded by the experts who 
have played over them as among the few 
real Scottish downs in the state. Part of 
the expense of maintaining them is met by 
small annual dues received from the 
players and the rest is borne by the same 
public-spirited residents, the Misses Eld- 
ridge, whose generosity first made the 
•course possible. 

As I said before, the downs are only a 
short walk from the public library, and a 
delightful walk it is too — through a park 
of venerable elms, along a gravel path 
skirting a shady road, through a meadow 
and a stretch of fragrant pines and lo ! 
we are there. Or, if we prefer to drive, 
we can do so over a well-kept road which 
brings us out, as the path does also, near 
a tall standard bearing the gilded crest of 
the Duke of Norfolk. 

From this point a good view of the 
grounds can be had. Bounded on all 
sides but one by acres of woodland the 
course rolls away for more than a mile in 
a series of tiny picturesque hills and 
Valle.ys <:overed with close-mown grass 



and dotted here and there with patches 
of laurel. On nine of these hills at 
irregular intervals from each other are the 






CHARI.ES H. PKCK, SECRETARY NORFOIvK 
DOWNS GOLF CIvUB. 



STANDARD NOREOI.K DOWNS GOI.F CLUB. 

" tees " and far from each of these in a 
somewhat inaccessible valley is its corres- 
ponding " green." By a system of 
underground mains water is brought from 
a distance to the " greens " and keeps 
them fresh even in the hottest season. 
To the south of the course is Toby Lake 
on whose wood-fringed shores are two or 
three summer cottages, while not far 
away to the north and the west rise the 
Berkshire Hills. 

The links are used from early spring 
till late fall, but of course the season is at 
its height • during July, August and Sep- 
tember. Then crowds of brown-faced, 
red-coated players may be seen on the 
downs every day, — some playing well, 
some poorly, but all greatly excited as 
they move along from "tee" to "tee." 
More than a hundred of them are mem- 
bers of the Norfolk Downs Golf Club, and 
it is from this number that the team is 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



269, 



selected each summer to represent the 
club in the Litchfield County Tourna- 
ment. In the last one four teams — two 
from Litchfield, one from Washington, 
and the home team — competed for a 
handsome silver cup, valued at one hun- 
dred dollars, which will become the prop- 
erty of the team that first wins it 'three 
times. It was won last August by the 
Norfolk team. Tournament week with 
its many gay events has come to be looked 
forward to eagerly by all who make our 
village their summer home. 



THE ORFORD GOLF CLUB. 

THE ex-champion Connecticut golf 
player is a member of the Orford 
Golf Club of Manchester and the club is 
unique aside from this in that it has all 
Cheneys on its team. The club was or- 
ganized in 1894. It has a nine-hole 
course in the center of the town of Man- 
chester. Orford was the old name of the 




CI,UB-HOUSE, ORFORD CI,UB. 

town and it is from this that the club takes 
its name. 

The golf course is a very good one and 
the holes are about 300 yards apart. The 
ground was once pasture land and is 
varied in character. The ground has 
been rolled and the turf is excellent. 
Twice the course crosses a brook and 
once it goes up a steep hill, then there is 
a deep gully, artificial bunkers at all 



the holes and a whole it is a very sporty 
course. Two of the holes are very long 
and there is only one that can be reached 
with the iron. The scenery is very pretty 




JOHN p. CHENKY, ORFORD CLUB. 

with the rolling hills and the pond, the- 
sheet of water being one of the hazards. 

The view of the course accompanying; 
this article shows a famous hole, No. 8, 
on the Orford Links, where a promising^ 
score is often ''killed." Standing on the 
spot from which the picture is taken, some 
200 feet above the brook, a good drive 
must clear the sandbank in the center ot 
the picture, well back of which is the 
green. A " topped " drive will roll down 
into the brook. 

The club-house is a rambling low build- 
ing with piazzas on three sides and its re- 
ception room has been the scene of manv 
choice social affairs. The house is pro- 
vided with kitchen, lockers, wash-room^ 
etc., and is cosy and comfortable. N. T. 
Pulsifer is president of the club and W. 
B. Cheney is captain. There are a num-. 
ber of young women in the club who are 
good players and some of the ladies are 



270 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT, 




VIEW SHOWING THK FAMOUS HOLE, NO. 8 ORFORD I.INKS 



officers of the organization, being repre- 
sented on the committees. There are 
matches once a week, often entertain- 
ments for Saturday and an annual tourna- 
ment. 

Thomas L. Cheney was formerly cham- 
pion until this summer. Charles Hitch- 
cock is the present champion, is the cliib 
member who is champion of the state and 
of Yale also. Recently he tied with 
Vardon, the Englii)h champion. It was 
at the State tournament at the Brooklawn 
Club that Cheney won the championship. 
The team is composed of T. L. Cheney, 
W. B. Cheney, W. C. Cheney, PhiUp Che- 
ney, Mark Cheney and John P. Cheney. 
The team has been very successful in all 
its matches. Improvements are to be 
made at the club-house and in another 
year the size of the course will be doubled 
as the club has all the land that is neces- 
sary. 



blessings of golf made them- 
selves so apparent to the citi- 
zens of Middletown that the 
membership of the club 
materially increased. Then 
the roll mounted up quickly 
to 60 members and it now 
carries 80 names. Women 
belonging to the families of 
members are honorary mem- 
bers and are exempt from 
dues or assessments. The 
officers of the club are : 
President, Samuel Russell ; 
captain, Dale D. Butler; sec- 
retary and treasurer, Frank A. Black- 
The management is intrusted to a 
board of governors. Among the best 
players are Samuel Russell, R. N. Jack- 
son, Dale D. Butler, Earle Butler, E. G. 
Derby, S. B. Page and W. B. Douglas. A 
remarkably fine landscape surrounds the 
links and the charming ladies who are in 
the club play the game with grace and 
skill. Last year the club played several 
matches with Hartford, New Haven, 
Wallingford and other clubs and the 
members met with fair success. The 
management has now in hand the matter 



ARAWANA GOLF CLUB. 

THE Arawana Golf Club of Middle- 
town was organized in 1894 with 
about 20 members. It has never been 
incorporated but it probably soon will be. 
It was not until the fall of 1898 that the 




DALE D. 



BUTLER, CAPTAIN ARAWANA 
GOLF CLUB. 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



271 



i 



Abawana Golf Club 

MIDDLCTOWN, CONN. 



Self, 



Self. 


Opp'nt 


HOLES. 


Self. 


Opp'nt 


No. 


NA«. 
TOBOGGAN 
LONG GREEN 
A CINCH 
TIPTOP 
RIDGE 


YJi. 

loF 

370 
100 
130 
400 
130 
360 
3S5 
150 
12.00 


,.__. 












d Scor 


6 i TROUBLE 

7 j TO THE WOODS 

8 NORTH STAR 

9 ; LAST CHANCE 
1 Total, 

e first 9 holes, 












Ad 







of the enlarge- 
ment of the 
links, thus pro- 
viding scope 
for increased 
skill. The lo- 
cation of the 
links is about a 
mile and a half 
from the Mid- 
dletown Main 
street and all 
who visit the 
links are favor- 
ably impressed 
with the scenic 
beauty and the adaptability of the 
ground to the game. The course is 
a 9 hole one and is located on an emin- 
ence which overlooks the city, river valley 
and a wide stretch of beautiful country on 
the Newfield road about a mile from the 
city. There are over 2,200 yards of per- 
fect turf with excellent greens. 



Event- 



Oppon't, 
Psite, 

SCORE CARD ARAWANA 
GOI<F CI.UB. 



BROOKLAWN COUNTRY CLUB. 

THE Brooklawn Country Club was 
started in Bridgeport in 1895. It 
has had a membership varying from 350 
to 500. Golf is the most popular out- 
door diversion and that game has 75 ac- 
tive devotees. The best players among 
the men are S. H. Patterson, H. H. Tay- 
lor, W. B. Wheeler, A. C. Wheeler, E. L. 
Ives, R. S. Hinks and J. M. Young. 

The club rendered a conspicuous ser- 
vice to State golf interests by offering its 
links for the launching of the Connecticut 
League of Golf Clubs, and a very success- 
ful tournament was held at the Brooklawn 
links in July of last year, it being the first 
tournament of the league. 

At that tournament, which covered 
nearly a week, some 80 entries were made 
in the individual contest and ten clubs 



from different parts of the State sent 
teams of six each to contest for the team 
prize. 

The individual championship was won 
by T. L. Cheney of the Orford Golf Club 
of South Manchester, and S. H. Patterson 
of the Brooklawn Club was the runner up. 

J. M. Young of the Brooklawn Club 
has recently been elected president of the 
League of Connecticut Golf Clubs for the 
year. The Brooklawn Club leases some 
sixty or more acres of land and has suf- 
ficient room and did have facilities for 
baseball, tennis and archery, but since 
golf has become so popular interest in the 
other sports has^decreased. A small sheet 
of water in the club grounds affords ex- 
cellent skating in winter and for the social 
side of the club there are fixtures almost 
weekly. 

The most popular one for the ladies is 
a series of contests of putting matches 
held on Saturday afternoons during the 
summer months. The best player among 
the women is Miss G. M. Bishop, who 
qualified in the first round of the women's 
national championship at Philadelphia 
last year and who recently won the cham- 
pionship at Palm Beach, Florida. 

John M. Young is the captain of the 
golf team of the club and the committee 
on golf is composed of John M. Young, 
Howard H. Knapp, William E. Baillie, 
Jonathan Godfrey and V. P. Gibney. 




CI,UB-HOUSK FROM EROOKT..\WN AVENUE. 



2/2 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



The present officers of the club are : 
President, Charles G. Sanford; Vice-Pre- 
sident, George W. Wheeler; Secretary, 
Fred Enos ; Treasurer, H. M. Knapp. 



GLASTONBURY GOLF CLUB. 

THE Glastonbury Golf Club was or- 
ganized in May, 1899. It is located 
in the town of Glastonbury about a mile 
from Wells corner and near the Williams 
factory. The links are about a mile in 
length and there are nine holes. Many 
improvements have been made this year 
in the grounds and new greens have been 
built. The ground is rolling with a pond 
for one hazard and a sand bank for an- 
other. 

J. S. Williams is President of the club, 
H. S. Goslee Treasurer, E. B. Hurlburt 
Secretary and George H. Pinney Captain. 
There is a membership of 35 and the dues 
are but $5 a year. It is the intention of 
the managers of the club to have an or- 
ganization that will not be expensive to 
belong to. The question of having a club- 
house has been discussed. It is expected 
that one will be built in another year. 

Several of the members live in sur- 
rounding towns. Among the best players 
are H. K. W. Welch, J. S. 
Williams and L. W. Ripley. 
Tournaments for members 
have been held at frequent 
intervals and they have been 
very successful. The scenery 
from some of the greens is 
very fine. The neighboring 
towns of Wethersfield, Hart- 
ford and Rocky Hill can be 
seen with the Talcott Moun- 
tains in the background. P'or 
a small club this one is doing 
splendidly and a great deal 
of interest is taken in it. 




ON THK IvlNKS MAPLE HII.I. GOI.F ClyUB. 



MAPLE HILL GOLF CLUB. 



T 



HE Maple Hill Golf Club of New- 
Britain was organized in March, 
1899. It has 280 members at present. 
The present course is a fair one, nine 
holes with a total length of 1,876 yards. 
The new course will be ready about July 
ist, and will be a nine-hole course of 2,700 
yards. Play was very general last year 
in this club but as the majority of players 
were new at the game few good ones 
were developed. The ladies' champion- 
ship cup was won by Miss Etheline W. 
Hart. There was no men's championship 
event. The first annual meeting of the 
club was held a short time ago and at 
that time it was voted to require the pay- 
ment of an initiation fee of five dollars 




CI.UB-HOUSE, MAPI.K HII.Iv GOI.F CIvUB. 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



273 



from all who join in the future. A vote 
of thanks was passed for Philip Corbin 
for his services as president for the first 




H. I,. CUKTIS, CAPTAIN MAPI,K HII.I. 
GOI<F CI.UB. 

year. The present officers of the club 
are as follows : President, L. Hoyt Pease ; 
Vice-Presidents, E. H. Davison and C.E. 
Wetmore ; Secretary, J. E. Cooper ; Cap- 
tain, William P. Felt ; Members of 
Board of Government for three years, 
F. H. Allis, George P. Hart and W. L. 
Hatch j two years, John R. Perkins. 



MERIDEN GOLF CLUB. 

THE Meriden Golf Club, which is one 
of the largest and strongest organ- 
izations of its kind in the state, was 
formed early in 1899, its playing up to 
this year being over a 9-hole course just 
outside the northern limits of the city. 

The past winter the club secured a lease 
of a tract of land embracing the old Brad- 
ley trotting park and including the fine 
old Bradley mansion as a club-house. 
The tract hes in the northern part of the 
city and is all embraced within the city 
limits, an unusually desirable location 
when it is considered that, as a rule, to 
obtain land enough, clubs are obliged to 
go some distance out. 

19 



The land is not only well situated, but 
is admirably adapted to golf purposes. 
As soon as it was secured a force of work- 
men began to clear it for the new links, 
and were kept at work throughout the 
season. Playing began upon the new 9- 
hole course the middle of April. 

The club house is an old, roomy man- 
sion, set well back from the street with a 
broad expanse of lawn set with great 
shade trees and exactly adapted to the 
needs of the club. 

The club has a membership of about 
200 and is growing rapidly. Its officers 
are as follows : President, Dr. E. T. Brad- 
street ; Secretary and Treasurer, C. T. 
Dodd ; Captain, F. E. Sands ; Executive 
Committee, Dr. H. A. Meeks, Chairman ; 
Dr. E. T. Bradstreet, Dr. E. W. Pierce, 
F. E. Sands, Wilbur F. Parker, A. D. 
Meeks, C. T. Dodd, D. N. Williams, 
Floyd Curtis, Dr. E. W. Smith and \\\ J. 
Prouty. Greens Committee : Dr. H. A. 
Meeks, F. E. Sands, Dr. E. W. Smith, A. 
D. Meeks and W. J. Prouty. 




F. e;. 



SANDS, CAPTAIN MERIDEN 
GOI.F CLUB. 



This spring the club engaged James 
Trumbull, the well-known professions], 
formerly of the Larchmont and Lawrence 



274 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



Harbor link, as greenkeeper 
and instructor. His wife acts as 
stewardess of the club-house. 

The club embraces in its 
membership a number of 
clever players. The club 
team under the training of 
Instructor Trumbull promises 
well for the coming year. It 
is run upon a novel plan, by 
means of which the best 
players can only secure posi- 
tions, and retain such posi- 
tions on the team in numeri- 
cal order, by virtue of su- 
perior playing. The team is made up 
of eleven players, the first six being 
the regular players and the others acting 
as substitutes, to be drawn in the order of 
their numerical standing. The team is 
composed of the following : 

Dr. E. W. Pierce, James H. Hinsdale, 
F.E. Sands, Captain; A. D. Meeks, O. 
C. Faupel, Dr. E. W. Smith, W. J. Prouty, 
Dr. E. A. Wilson, Dr. H. Meeks, W. F. 
Parker and Floyd Curtis. 

The club is looking forward to a very 
successful season this year. The new 
links will be in fine shape by the early 
summer, and the club will be then estab- 
lished as well as any in the state. The 
links are of the following lengths : 




CI.UB-HOUSE, MERIDEN GOI.F CI,UB. 

William Maxwell and William H. Pres- 
cott. The full length of the course was 
1,427 yards. 



232 yards. 
178 '' 
300 " 
204 '' 

220 " 



6, 

7, 

9y 



215 yards. 
242 " 

242 " 
378 '' 



Total, 2,311 yards. 



SHENIPSIT GOLF CLUB. 



THE Shenipsit course at Rockville 
was laid out in July, 1896, by Ro- 
bert D. Pryde, now the greenkeeper at 
the New Haven Golf Club. The grounds 
are beautifully situated on the west shore 
of Lake Shenipsit and the club takes its 
name from that body of water. The course 
was originally laid out for private purposes 
as it was on land owned by F. T. and 




CI.UB-HOUSK SHKNIPSlT GOIvF CI.UB. 

In May, 1897, the Shenipsit Club was 
formed with William Maxwell, President ; 
Miss Lida Prescott, Vice-President, and 
A. T. Bissell, Secretary and Treasurer. At 
that time the club had 48 members and 
and the present club house was built in 
August of that year. The course was also 
lengthened to the present distance, 1,930 
yards. The name and length of "each hole 
is as follows : 



162 yards. 
219 

228 

304 
169 
181 
120 

138 
309 



I. 


Club House, 


2. 


Farm, . . 


3- 


Heights, . 


4- 


View, 


S- 


Brae, . . . 


6. 


Lake, . . 


7- 


Grove, . 


8. 


Knoll, . 


9- 


Home, . . 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT, 



275 



VIKW OF SHENIPSIT I,AKE FROM CI^UB-HOUSE. 

The course consists mostly of old 
pasture and grazing land and abounds 
in natural hazards composed largely of 
stone walls. The view obtained from the 
first four links is unsurpassed, with Mt« 
Tom and Springfield to the north, the 
valley of the Connecticut and Hartford 
to the west and the beautiful Lake 
Shenipsit and the Tolland hills to the 
east. Dances and parties are frequently 
held at the club house, which com- 
mands a fine view of the course and lake. 

The club has some very good players. 
Last year's team consisted of Charles Al- 




len, George E. Sykes, 
Oliver T. Hyde, H. J. 
Mandell, and J. P. Cam- 
eron, Captain. The record 
for the course is 39, held 
by Charles Allen. Among 
the best women players 
are Mrs. J. P. Cameron, 
Miss J. Alice Maxwell, and 
Miss Florence Belding. 
Mrs. J. P. Cameron holds 
the ladies' record, 51. 
The present officers of 
the club are : William 
Maxwell, President ; Mrs. 
B. H. Bill, Vice-President, 
and J. P. Cameron, Sec- 
retary and Treasurer. The 
club membership is 93. 





J. p. CAMKRON, CAPTAIN SHENIPSIT 
GOI.F CLUB. 



CHARI.ES N. AI.I.EN, SHENIPSIT GOIvF CI.UB 

HOI.DER OF CI.UB RECORD ON 

THE COURSE. 



COUNTRY CLUB, FARMINGTON. 

THE Country Club at Farmington 
takes in all kinds of sports. In the 
past few years golf has rather outclassed 
the other forms of exercise out there and 
now the club has an excellent 9 -hole 
course. The club has about 100 acres 
and the land is very well adapted for golf 
playing. It is an old pasture ground and 
the links are close and short, at least the 
grass is. 

The links are situated back of the club 
house and extend to the picturesque 



2/6 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



Farmington River, which was once the 
favorite fishing ground of the Tunxis In- 
dians and later a camp for the British 
soldiers during the Revolution. The club 




GROUNDS OF THK COUNTRY CI.UB, 
FARMINGTON. 

house is a roomy building that has been 
remodeled and now it is very comfortable. 
It has a well-appointed dining room and 
kitchen, reception rooms, and on the upper 
floors there are bed-rooms. D. Newton 
Barney of Farmington, is the President ; 
John H. Hall of Hartford, Vice-Presi- 
dent; Dr. Wm. D. Morgan of Hartford, 
Second Vice-President; Morris Penrose 
of Hartford, Secretary, and Louis Parker 
of Hartford, Treasurer. Among the best 
players are Mr. Barney, H. B. Steadman, 
W. A. Hooker, E. Henry Hyde and R. 
G. Erwin. 

The far-famed Elm Tree Inn, managed 
by Arthur W. Rood, adjoins the club 
house and the two make a magnet for 




golfers from far and near. The club has 
a membership that extends all over the 
state, but principally in Hartford, Farm- 
ington, New Britain, Bridgeport and 
Waterbury. The links are often used by 
the relatives and friends of the girls at- 
tending Miss Porter's School at Farming- 
ton who visit the old town for the purpose 
of seeing the girls. The young ladies 
also play and some of them are very pro- 
ficient. 



WALLINGFORD GOLF CLUB. 

PRESIDENT, George D. Munson ; 
Vice-President, Dr. William S. Rus- 
sell ; Secretary, Roland F. Andrews ; 
Treasurer, William H. Edsall ; Captain, 
Harley H. Hawkins ; Associate Captain, 
Miss Claire Banks. 




CI,UB-HOUSE, COUNTRY CI^UB, FARMINGTON. 



HARI^FY H. HAWKINS, CAPTAIN WAI.I.ING- 
FORD GOI^F CI,UB. 

Board of Governors : Lothar Von 
Grave, Dr. Wilham S. Russell, Roland F. 
Andrews, W. J. Leavenworth, Walter H. 
Young, George D. Munson, William H. 
Edsall, C. H. Tibbits, Miss Caroline 
Runtz-Rees. 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



277 




CI.UB-HOUSE, WALLINGFORD GOI.F ClyUB. 

Greens Committee : Harley H. Haw- 
>ins, Chairman ; Dr. William S. Russell, 
John P. Stevenson. 

Tournament Committee : Lothar Von 
Grave, Chairman j Walter H.Young, Miss 
Runtz-Rees. 

House Committee : Henry L. Davis, 
Chairman; Charles D. Morris, Mrs. W. 
S. Russell, Mrs. C. H. Tibbits, Miss Claire 
Banks. 




MISS CAROI.INE RUNTZ-REES, LEADING 

LADY PLAYER, WALLINGFORD GOLF 

CLUB. 

Team : Harley H. Hawkins, Captain ; 
Dr. William S. Russell, William H. Hap- 
good, George F. Fiske, Henry L. Davis, 
John P. Stevenson, George D. Munson, 
Walter H. Young. 



Green Keeper : Charles Foster. 
The club was organized March, 
1898. Annual meetings and election 
of officers, third Wednesday of 
March each year. 

Club colors, red and green. 
The club, consisting of active and 
associate members, is in a very 
flourishing condition. The active 
membership is limited at 100 which 
figure was reached at the opening of 
the 1900 season with quite a num- 
ber on the waiting list. The playing 
interest seems almost equally divided 
between the men and women players. 

Active members are divided in four 
classes, viz. : Class A and B Men, and 
Class A and B Women. Each class hav- 
ing its own trophy for tournaments which 
are regularly played twice a month. The 
team this year has entered an inter-club 
league with Middletown, Meriden and 
New Britain. 

The links comprise a 9-hole course 
with a total distance of 2,042 yards. The 
course is over an undulating country, inter- 
spersed with well placed natural hazards. 
Entrance to the course and club house 
is on Constitution Street, near terminus of 
Electric Road on Center Street. 

The new club house which was finished 
April I, 1900, is comfortably furnished 
with lockers, running water, etc., and 
pleasantly placed in a grove on elevated 
ground near the first tee, dominating al- 
most entire course and affording a pic- 
turesque view of the town and surrounding 
country. 



WILLIMANTIC GOLF CLUB. 

THE citizens of Willimantic are proud 
of their thread mills but they dis- 
like to have everything in the place called 
the "Thread City." Therefore, when the 
golf club was formed and it selected the 



278 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



name of the Willimantic instead of the 
Thread City organization there was much 
rejoicing and all kinds of prosperity were 
predicted. This club is one of the 
youngest in the state as it was not organ- 
ized until last fall. It is a'lusty youngster 
and steps have already been taken to im- 
prove and enlarge the course. Early in 
April the officers held a meeting and 
added several members to the roll. 

The grounds are on the South Coventry 
road, and about a mile and a quarter dis- 
tant from the center of the city. There 
are hillocks and dales and stonewalls and 
on one side is the Willimantic River, 
making a course that is certainly pic- 
turesque. The Rev. E. A. George, the 
pastor of the Congregational Church, was 
largely instrumental in getting the club 
started. He had played on the links at 
Pomfret and was so enthusiastic over the 
sport that he interested others in the 
matter. 

The club is fully equipped and the 
members played all winter. There are 
quite a number of ladies who play and 
some excellent scores are made by them. 
D. Everett Taylor is president, and At- 
torney William Ansel Arnold is secretary 
and treasurer. These officers, with Samuel 
Chesbro, G. P. Phoenix and Herbert E. 
Clark compose the board of directors. 
Some of the best players are Rev. E. A. 
George, Huber Morrison, A. D. Chaffee, 
W. A. Arnold and Judge Goodrich of 
Brooklyn, N. Y. 



FAIRFIELD COUNTY GOLF |^CLUB. 

THE Fairfield County Golf Club at 
Greenwich is one of the best known 
in the state and it contains some excel- 
lent golfers. The incorporators of the 
club are Julian W. Curtiss, John H. Bos- 
well, James McCutcheon, Edward K. 



Willard, James Pott, Jr., Edwin B. Curtiss 
and George P. Sheldon. The organiza- 
tion is empowered to hold real estate to 
the value of $100,000. 




CI.UB-HOUSE FAIRFIELD COUNTY CLUB. 

The charter members were required to 
subscribe for at least one membership at 
^100. The yearly dues are $25 and the 
initiation fee is the same amount. No 
person not a member of the club and re- 
siding for thirty days or more within a 
radius of seven miles of the clubhouse 
may use the hnks, but friends of members, 
so residing, are welcome to privileges of 
clubhouse whenever properly introduced. 

The executive committee appoints 
three standing committees, house, greens 
and handicap committee. The house 
committee is composed of three members 
and it has full charge of the club house. 
The treasurer is an ex-officio member of 
this committee. The handicap commit- 
tee is also composed of three members 
and they have lull charge of all club com- 
petitions other than matches engaged in 
by the club teams. 




FAIRFIELD COUNTY GOLF CLUB, LOOKING 
FROM HIGH TEE. 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT, 



279 



The club insignia is a burgee with light 
navy blue background and monogram in 
white. The charter members of the club 
are as follows : 



Anderson, A. A. 
Alexandre, Mrs. 

Natalie 
Adams, Allen, W. 
Bond, F. E. V. 
Baker, Stephen 
Baker, Robert B 
Brown, Samuel W. 
Brooks, Charles A. 
Baldwin, J. C. 
Beal, W. R. 
Bouchelle, W. T. 
Curtiss, E. B. 
Cammann, H, L. 
Curtiss, Julian W. 
Converse, E. C. 
Carhart, William E 
Freeman, Frank M. 
Hoyt, Edward C. 
Hooper, T. D. 
Hubbell, George W. 
Hoyt, Walter S. 
Hilliard, Freder'kC. 
Hoyt, George S. 
Holmes, Thomas S. 
Irockwood, Edgar 
Logan, W. J. 
McCutcheon, James 
McCord, W. H. 



McAlpin, George ly. 
Murphy, P. F. 
Martin, W. R. H. 
Mason, J. M. 
Mellen, N. C. 
Norton, E. N. 
Outerbridge, A. E. 
Park, Hobart J. 
Powell, De Veaux 
Pierce, Charles T. 
Renner, F. G. 
Robins, CD. 
Russel, E. W. 
Ritter, F. W. 
Sanger, F. W. 
Stephens, L- H. 
Stewart, P. M. 
Sheldon, George P. 
Temple, William 
Tiedemann, Theo- 
dore 
Tatum, Charles A. 
Tyson, George G. 
Tod, J. Kennedy 
Wallace, E. C. 
Wills, Charles T. 
Willard, E. K. 
Whiteman, A. V. 
Waterman, Will'm E. 



fORWICHCLUB 
■ LINKS.— Golf 
is a feature of 
the Norwich 
Club — a social 
organization of 
this city — hav- 
ing its home on 
Crescent street. 
The officers of 
the club are : 
C. L. Hubbard, 
President; C. R. Butts, Treasurer, and 
J. C. Averill, Secretary. The green 
committee for this year are E. Wallner, 
chairman; A. H. Chase, Willis Austin 
and F. T. Sayles. 

The first hole of the nine hole course 
has its tee at the rear of the club house 




and is a drive and full iron to the green 
which is very small and shut in by a bank 
on two sides and a wall in the rear. 

A carry of about a quarter of a mile 
ends on the second tee from which a 
drive — woods punishing pull or slice — 
and a full iron over a ledge should land 
the ball on the second green. A full iron 
will carry to the third green which is 
hidden from the tee by an elevation and 
which punishes an over shot by a disused 
road and adjacent stone wall. 

The fourth hole is also hidden from the 
tee and is reached by a drive and half 
iron — a foozle of the former being pun- 




CI,UB-HOUSE, NORWICH CLUB. 

ished by a stone wall with like trouble for 
the latter. 

The drive to the fifth hole is from the 
crest of a knoll, across rapidly falling 
ground and a sunken road bounded by 
two stone walls ; if this is crossed safely 
still another wall is between the ball and 
the green which should be reached by a 
full iron. 

A good drive — crossing another wall — 
with a short approach should find the ball 
on the sixth green. 

The seventh hole is perhaps the most 
difficult on the course. The green can 
be reached by drive, brassey and full iron ; 
but the tee has in front the sunken road 
again with its two walls, while a pulled 



28o 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



ball will find another sunken road 
with the inevitable wall between it 
and the fair green and both the 
brassey and iron must be over 
walls. 

The eighth and longest hole 
requires a good drive — a pull 
punished by wild going — a long 
brassey over two walls and the 
sunken road — a full iron with 
woods for pull or slice and a short 
approach over a trap bunker. Passing 
down the carry again a drive over a 
raised road followed by a good iron over 
a bunker guarding the green leaves the 
player again at the club house. 




INNIS ARDEN GOLF CLUB. 



THE Innis Arden Golf Club was or- 
ganized a short time ago at Sound 
Beach. A number of well-known New 
Yorkers who are summer residents of 
Sound Beach are charter members. A 9- 
hole course of 2,940 yards has been laid 
out. It is situated along the Sound on 
the estate of Innis Arden. This has long 
been noted as one of the handsomest of 
the many show places along the Sound. 
The peninsular is bounded on two sides 
by the sound, on the other by Greenwich 
Cove. This club holds the record for 
the value of its links in the real estate 
market. If cut into plots it is estimated 




ENTRANCE AND LODGE, INNIS ARDHN 
GOLF CLUB. 



VIEW FROM THE GROUND OF THE INNIS ARDEN 
GOLF CLUB. 



that the links would net the owner a half 
million dollars. J. Kennedy Tod, a New 
York banker, is the owner. The ground 
for the links comprises forty-five acres 
and is the gate-way to the peninsula on 
which Mr. Tod has his summer home, 
connecting it with the mainland. The 
part reserved by Mr. Tod contains 200 
acres and is separated from the links by 
an artificial lake. 

Henry J. Lucas, the vice-president, has 
donated the casino which he built last 
year on his estate as a club house. It is 
known as the Greenwich Cove Casino. 
It is on the mainland, near the ninth tee 
and is well equipped with bath, lockers 
and lounging rooms. The club has boat 
docks on the Cove side and bathing 
houses along the Sound shore, where the 
beach is one of the best to be had any- 
where. The membership is limited to 
TOO and includes H. O. Havemeyer, who 
has a house near by, and his son, the Yale 
player. 

The officers of the club are : Presi- 
dent, J. Kennedy Tod; Vice-President, 
Henry J. Lucas ; Secretary, W. B. Strong ; 
Treasurer, E. R. Washburn ; Governors, 
Frederick Toppings, Edwin Burney, E. 
Hope Norton, F. W. Tuttle, J. H. White, 
J. K. Tod, E. J. Lucas, W. B. Strong and 
E. R. Washburn. 

As these links represent such a large 
money value a description of them, taken 
from the New York Sun, is of interest : 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



281 



The ground on which the nine-hole Hnks 
is laid out is covered by the best possible 
turf, nearly equal to a well kept lawn in 
its verdant thickness. The first hole, 250 
yards, is an open one, but two bunkers 
^re to be cut out, one near the tee and 
■one to guard the green. A pond must 
be carried on the second shot to the 
second hole, the distance being 400 
yards, and the green on the extreme end 
of the promontory, commanding a grand 
marine view. Near the water, too, is the 
third tee, the play being up the hill 
crowned with a tripod bearing the beacon, 
one of the landmarks known to all who 
sail on the Sound. The distance is 255 
yards. The fourth tee is on the apex of 
the hill, overlooking the Sound, Green- 
wich Cove, and landward, the Fairfield 
Hills. The play is over undulating land, 
trending downward. The distance is 335 
yards. The fifth hole is only four yards 
shorter. This green is between the Sound 
and the artificial lake on Mr. Tod's 
grounds, the tee being on the hill. Tee- 
ing up near the lake, the play is along 
the bank for 273 yards, but only a very 
poorly pulled ball will be punished. Now 
comes the "Crescent" hole, 543 yards, 
and a hard one to play in par figures 
about two hundred and fifty yards from 
the tee the " Beacon " hill rises, the green 
lying in a hollow beyond. Although the 
eighth tee is on the hillside, the hole, 250 




yards away, is a blind one, a still higher 
hill coming between it and the hole, 
forming a grand natural hazard. The 
ninth hole has a playing length of 267 
yards. The only hazard is the road lead- 
ing to Mr. Tod's grounds. 



QUAGANOPOXET GOLF CLUB. 




CASINO, INNIS AHDEN GOIvF Cl^UB. 



Quaganopoxet 

Golf Club of New London was started 

in the spring of 1897. The grounds 

comprise about seventy-five acres and 

are beautifully situated along the 

Sound, about one mile west of the 

Thames River. The grounds have 

a water frontage of one-third of a 

mile and are swept by ocean breezes. 

The place was an old farm and the 

turf is mostly excellent. The farm 

house, which is over 100 years old, 

has been renovated and is used a club 

house. 

The memership has never been very 
large. Most of the members are sum- 
mer residents of New London. While 
there are no great golfers in the or- 



282 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



ganization there are many men and 
women members who play a strong 
game. The team has been very success- 
ful in the few matches in which it has 
participated. The club belongs to the 
Connecticut League of Golf Clubs. 

The ofiiceis of the club are : President, 
Colonel A-. C. Tyler ; Vice-President, Dr. 
William Appleton ; Secretary, Major Ros- 
well D. Trimble ; Treasurer, F. W. Foos ; 
Captain of the Green, Captain C. P. 
Kirkland. These officers with Frank L. 
Palmer and W. W. Bond form the Board 
of Governors. 

The club has a 9-hole course and the 
playing distance is 2,316 yards. Improve- 
ments have been made each year and 
now the grounds are as good as any of 
their size in the country. The putting 
greens are not as large as the members 
would desire as they are only 40 x 60 feet 
square, but otherwise they are excellent. 
The view from the club house is very fine, 
as it overlooks the entire course and the 
Sound beyond. 



to the well leveled surface of the field 
somewhat resembling the links of the 
Lakewood Golf Club. 




WATERBURY GOLF ASSOCIATION. 



WII<I.IAM B. MERRIMAN, CAPTAIN WATER- 
BURY GOIvF ASSOCIATION. 

The view to the north is delightful es- 
pecially in the changing lights of morning 
and evening, with the river on the left 
skirted by overhanging trees and marking 
the line of hazard on the western bound- 
ary, a middle ground broken by a few 
fine shade trees, and in the distance a 
long line of hill extending to old Ply- 



BEAUTIFULLY situated and easily 
accessable, with a splendidly ap- 
pointed clubhouse and a well-kept field, 
the course of the Waterbury Golf Associa- 
tion is one of the most attractive in the 





CI.UB-HOUSE, WATERBURY GOI,F CI.UB. 



CHARIvES R. VAILIv, WATERBURY GOI,F 

CI^UB, HOI.DER CI.UB RECORD FOR 

18 HOIvES. 



State. From the veranda of the club- 
house can be seen, more or less distinctly 
efvery one of the nine greens, due largely 



mouth, give picturesque surroundings 
that are at once the pride of the club and 
the envy of visiting golfers. 



GOLF CLUBS IN CONNECTICUT. 



283 



Waterbury began to play golf in 1896, 
at which time Mr. Arthur Fenn laid out a 
short nine hole course on part of the 
grounds now in use and interest amount- 




VIEW OF COURSE, WATERBURY GOI.E CI.UB 



ing to enthusiasm has never lagged. To 
a stranger it would seem an easy matter 
to cover the 2,660 playing yards in a 
" 45," but that is really an excellent score 
for a player well up in the game, and al- 
though there are no artificial bunkers in 
sight, the many natural gullies and dry 
ditches form splendid obstacles to indif- 
ferent play, not only as obstacles to be 
safely negotiated are these ditched to be 
considered, but being as nicely grassed as 
the fair green and of 
great variation i n 
width, they c o n - 
stantly call into use 
the finest judgment 
of distance to be 
properly played. It 
would be difficult to 
find a better play- 
ing turf than that 
of this course, the 
soil being light and 
fertile, but like many 
other New England 
links, it cannot resist 
the effect of pro- 
On the upper end 
of the course there are several places 
where a good drive is heavily penalized 
by a bad lie, but the men and women 
alike take all as it comes, and the 
childish rule of placing a ball out of a bad 




DR. CAROI^INE R. 
CONKEY, WATER- 
BURY GOI.F CI.UB, 
WON LADIES 
CHAMPIONSHIP 
~ 1899. 

longed dry weather. 



lie has never been seriously discussed by 
the committee. 

The club house is a Junique structure 
built of moss covered field stones and 
logs, and' 'large locker 
rooms and spacious veran- 
das are its prime features. 
In club play Waterbury 
has not been very strong 
in matches other than 
those played on the home 
grounds, but in these has 
been defeated but once, 
by the Hartford Club in 1899. 

The leaders among the men are Mr. 
W. B. Merriman, captain of the team, 
Mr. N. R. Bronson, and Mr. C. R. Vaill. 
It would be a difficult matter to decide 
which of these gentlemen is the best. 
Mr. Merriman was " runner-up " to the 
present champion in a very close match 
at the close of last season, and as his 
scores are always high in team play, there 
is hardly a doubt that he holds first place 
as an exponent of the game in Waterbury. 
Mr. Bronson is the present holder of the 
coveted "President's Cup," a silver 
trophy given by the first president, Mr. 
C. L. Holmes, to be played for twice 
yearly until won three times by the same 
player. Mr. Vaill, the association's able 
secretary, holds the present club record 
for eighteen holes. He is a steady player 
and always shows up strong in team play. 
_ Dr. Caroline R. 

/^^— g.X Conkey is undoubt- 

/ ^^Hk \ ^^^y the best player 
( V^^^ ' among the ladies. She 
\ 3BK / ^^ ^ woman of su- 
^-'^{^^►^ perior physical 
"DALY." strength, vigor and 

nerve, and a one hun- 
dred and fifty yard drive is not an un- 
common feature of her play. Dr. Con- 
key won the ladies championship last 
year. 



284 



TO A SUNBEAM. 



The " Captain's Cup," a trophy re- 
cently presented by Mr. Merriman, will 
be played for in a series of handicap 
matches running through this summer 
and fall. 

Bogie for the nine holes is 2i^. This is 
a low figure, however, and might safely 
be raised three points. The professional 
record, made by Harry Reddy, is 39. 

The Waterbury Golf Association is an 
allied member of the U. S. G. A., and a 
•charter member of the Connecticut 
League of Golf Clubs, and is represented 
■on the executive committee of the latter 
organization by Mr. C. L. Holmes. 

Officers : President, Mr. N. R. Bron- 



son; Secretary, Mr. Charles R. Vaill, 
Treasurer, Mr. W. B. Bryan. 

Men's team : W. B. Merriman, cap- 
tain, Messrs. N. R. Bronson, W. W. 
Holmes, C. L. Holmes, C. J. Griggs, H. 
M. Steele. 

Ladies' team : Mrs. Irving H. Chase, 
captain, Mrs. J. H. Bronson, Dr. Caroline 
R. Conkey, Miss Helen Williams, Miss 
Florence Chipman. 

The Waterbury Golf Association was 
organized in 1899, under the laws of the 
State of Connecticut, as a corporation 
without stock. 

The membership roll now contains 200 
names. 




TO A SUNBEAM. 



Shaft of splendor. 
Sweet and slender, 
From the smiling sun, 
Brightly sparkling 
In the darkling 
Leaves you fall upon ! 



You betoken 
Love unspoken 
From a source unseen. 
Which surrounds us 
Tics and bounds us 
In our life's demesne. 

Margherita Arlina Hamm. 



NATHAN HALE. 
NATHAN HALE. 



285 



DEDICATED TO THE NORWALK CHAPTER, D. A. R. 



Our land lay weak and wounded ; 

They called for a volunteer, 
For a service sorely needed, 

For a service lone and drear. 

There stood in line to harken 

Strong men all bravely bred ; 

And each man listened silently, 

And each man shook his head. 

They were men who heard the summons. 
But none would answer the call. 

Till one rose up among them. 
The youngest of them all. 

Said he : '' This mission lowly, 

We like it not at all ; 
Yet is't not service holy 

To follow duty's call? 

And with our country needing, 
Shall true sons say her nay ? 

E'en though the heart be bleeding. 
Be my part to obey." 

Love asked him, '' Art thou ready? " 
Love said, " And must thou go? " 

So young, so gay, so gallant, 
Behold, the dead lie low." 

For Love, so sweet and human 
His heart held tender place ; 

Yet more than love of woman 
He loved his land, his race. 

Not his the halting footstep, 

Not his the length'ning face ; 

But forth upon his errand 

He sped with youth's glad grace. 

His work so soon was ended. 
His sun so early set ; 
They reared the ghastly gallows 
While yet the dew lay wet. 



In light of early morning 
They raised the hero there ; 
Without an arm to lean upon, 
Without a psalm or prayer. 

Up spake the brutal hangman,. 
'* What now, O spy, wilt say ? 
Dost beg for British mercy? 
Dost plead an hour's delay? "• 

Clear as a bell the answer, 
" Only one boon I'd pray. 
Sweet country, on thine altai:- 
More than one life to lay." 

In light of early morning 

They left his body there ; 

While never a heart wept o'er him— . 

With never a psalm or prayer. 

With never a heart to lean upon,. 
With never a sob he died ; 
But God is God ; his fruitful life 
Its seed hath scattered wide. 

And sometimes a rugged school-boy. 
Who cons the story o'er, 
Thrills to find an answering echo, 
In his soul to his of yore. 

And sometimes a weeping woman, 
In the shadow of Death's dark vale. 
Closes her white lips tighter 
And murmurs the name of Hale. 

And sometimes the man of action 
Is girded to mightier thought. 
As he hears the patriot's story 
And thinks what God hath wrought. 

And so, in Heaven's sweet ruling, 
The hero hath his way ; 
And in the lives of others 
He gives his own to-day. 

Genevieve Hale Whitlock, 



HISTORICAL NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE. 



Interesting open letter from Hezekiah 
King to B. Le welly n Burr, author of the 
descriptive sketch of Rockville that ap- 
peared in issue for February, 1900 : 

DoBBS Ferry-on- Hudson, 

March 23, 1900. 
B. Lewellyn Burr, Esq., 

Dear Sir : I have enjoyed your article 
in The Connecticut Magazine respecting 
Rockville. It is in a section of the state 
now out of the line of travel, and its rural 
charms are not well known. As you have 
studied its history I thought you would 
be interested in a few scraps of informa- 
tion that I have been born to, which may 
be of service. 

1st. The initial impulse to manufac- 
turing in the neighborhood was not from 
Mr. Peter Dobson, but from a fellow 
Englishman from the same town, (Black- 
burn, England,) Mr. John Warburton, 
who came over 1 790-1 795 and built a 
mill on the Tankarooson near Manchester. 
He must have been successful for he built 
a brick residence with a chimney in each 
corner. (This building was standing five 
years ago.) Mr. Warburton died at 
middle age but left a competence for his 
family. 

2d. As to the Alms House, when it 
was built in 1820, it was on the great mail 
thoroughfare between Boston and New 
York. The travel was large, as the other 
route was by sea around Point Judith, and 
was avoided in the winter. 

In Hartford Mr. Morgan conducted the 
Stage House. Mr. James Goodwin owned 
286 



the first 15 miles out of Hartford, and 
my father and grandfather owned the 
.next 15 miles. Like all traveling business 
it was a great tax as to strength, hours 
and the like, but was profitable. Later, 
steam and the railway ran away with the 
business. 

3d. As to the decoration of the house, 
it was not done for Lafayette, but the 
parlor was papered in the best style of 
the day, which was a classic mythological 
French paper. As a four-year old I have 
studied it often. 

4th. Lafayette did breakfast at the 
house and was met by such of the notables 
who llived near, especially by veterans 
of the Revolutionary War. My grand- 
father, Lemuel King, was one of them. 
Of one of these, Capt. Chapman, who had 
been on his staff, I have been told by 
father his greeting was very effusive and 
French. 

5th. As to the Puritanic Sabbath, I 
am glad you have to say a good word. 
For the bogie that is now shown up as 
the Puritan is of a late day manufacture. 
Did our fathers dance? Yes. Mr. War- 
burton, my father and my grandfather all 
had dancing rooms with spring floors. 
Did they go to church ? Yes, they did 
and took their children with them. 

My forbears, (same name as mine,) 
took up the valley at the head of the 
Tankarooson about 1720 and it remained 
in the family for 100 years. On my 
father's coming of age his father built for 
him the tavern, now the Alms House, and 
gave to him the business. In that house 



HISTORICAL NOTES AND CORRESPONDENCE. 



287 



I was born. Later, I was at Judge Hall's 
School in Ellington, and in passing back 
and forward have been many times over 
the ground, where was only Payne's grist 
mill, Sam Cooley's fuUing mill and the 
Red mill, and I remember the fall and the 
wildness. I have fished and swam in the 
Snipsic Lake, (pond then.) 

A few years back I visited the ground 
with my son and was surprised by the 
pretty city that had grown, where when a 
boy, Parson Brockway used to go out to 
preach to a mission. 

My kindred have all left the neighbor- 
hood, but when I visited the three bury- 
ing places I was pleased to find that the 
town, out of regard to the old family 
visitors had made provision to keep them 
in good order. 

My mother was a Miss Warburton, and 
therefore you can see I have kindly feel- 
ing for Vernon 

Yours very respectfully, 

Hezekiah King. 



Edtitor Connecticut Magazine : 

In justice to the people of Hazel Green, 
Wis., I would like to say that my article 
on the poet Percival, printed in the Feb- 
ruary issue of your magazine, was written 
nearly two years ago and that since that 
time there has been a revival of mining 
interests in that region. The famous 
Crawford mines at Hazel Green have lately 
been sold for ^120,000. It is once more 
profitable to mine in southwest Wisconsin 
and there is good prospect that the region 
in which Hazel Green is situated will now 
enter upon a new era of prosperity. 
Very truly, 

C. A. Wight. 
Platteville, Wis., April, 5, 1900. 



AN HISTORICAL DOCUMENT. 



THE TREATY BETWEEN UNCAS AND THE CON- 
NECTICUT COLONY PRESERVED BY 
EMERY PROCESS. 



G. S. Goddard, the Assistant State Lib- 
rarian, has had the original treaty between 
Uncas, the sachem of the Mohegans, and 
the Connecticut colony, preserved by the 
Emery process of placing the pages be- 
tween sheets of thin, transparent silk. 
The treaty was made May 18, 1681, and 
is signed by the marks of Uncas, and of 
his son, Owaneco, and by the signature of 
the latter's son Josiah. 

The sign mark of Uncas is a crude 
drawing of the head and body of a man. 
The figure of a turkey is the mark made 
by Owaneco, while Unca's grandson, Jo- 
siah, writes his name " Josih." The hand- 
writing is tolerably fair, but the young 
Indian prince, while he had learned how 
to write his name, was deficient in his 
spelling. The treaty was witnessed by 
Samuel Mason and Nehemiah Palmer for 
the white people and by Hiernan of Wa- 
wamet and by Cottaposet for the Indians. 
The white witnesses wrote their names in 
a legible hand, but the Indians made their 
marks, that of Hiernan being a bird and 
of Cottaposet a half moon. 

The treaty provides for a continuance 
of the friendly relations between the In- 
dians and the colonists. The document 
is a precious one and is of great historical 
value. The signature or mark of Uncas 
is very rare. 



The historic Warwick farm of 515 acres 
in Warwick township, Chester Co., Pa., 
was sold a short time since for 5 12,000. 
On this property the old Warwick fur- 
nace, famous as being probably the first 



288 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



to make iron in the United Slates, was 
put into blast about the year 1730 and 
here many of the cannon used by the 
patriot army in the revolution were cast. 
In the meadows pieces of ordnance 
lie buried, having been thus secreted to 
prevent them from falling into the hands 
of the British after the battle of Brandy- 
wine in 1777, when General Washington 
and his army were retreating northward 
through Chester county. 



CHAMBERLAIN SWORD TO BE 
RETURNED. 

The sword which Captain V. B. Cham- 
berlain, Company A, Seventh C. V., 



yielded to Captain Charles E. Chichester* 
after a heroic charge on Fort Wagner, on 
July II, 1863, and which is in the posses- 
sion of the Rev. Charles Vedder of 
Charlestown, S. C, will be returned to 
Captain Chamberlain's family. Frederick 
S. Chamberlain, who has been following, 
up the inquiry concerning the sword lost 
by his father, Captain V. B. Chamberlain, 
has received a letter from Mr. Vedder 
saying that the sword will be sent to H. 
M. Knapp of Bridgeport, who started the 
inquiry, and by him will be forwarded to 
the family in New Britain. 




EE^g^d®© 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Querists are requested to write all names of persons and places so that they cannot 
be misunderstood, to write on only one side of the paper, to enclose a self-addressed, 
stamped envelope, and ten cents in stamps for each query. Those who are subscribers- 
will be given preference in the insertion of their queries and they will be inserted in the 
order in which they are received. All matters relating to this department must be sent 
to The Connecticut Magazine, Hartford, marked Genealogical Department. Give 
full name and post office address. 

It is optional with querist to have name and address or initials published. 



ANSWERS. 

To No. 9, (e) . Lucy Latham, daughter 
of William and Hannah (Morgan) Latham, 
was b. May 21, 1709 ; m. June 16, 1726, 
Ebenezer Avery; d. May 2, 1758. They 
lived in Groton, Conn. 

Mrs. Elroy M. Avery, 
657 Woadland Hills, 

Cleveland, Ohio. 



To No. 26. Moses Doolittle m. first 
Ruth Hills and second, Lydia Richardson. 
Moses Doolittle and his two wives were 
buried in our town cemetery and their 
names all appear on stones erected to 
their memory. 

E. R. Brown, 
Cheshire, Conn. 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT, 



289 



To No. 22, (e). From Dr. Selleck's 
History of Norwalk page 383. — Mary the 
dau. of Daniel Belden and his first wife, 
Elizabeth Smith, who was killed by the 
Indians in 1696 at Deerfield, Mass., was 
b. Nov. 17, 1677, m. James Trowbridge 
April 19, 1698. Page 251. — Mary Com- 
stock, dau. of Samuel and Sarah (Han- 
ford) Comstock, grand dau. of Rev. 
Thomas Hanford, first minister of Nor- 
walk, was b. Aug. 5, 1 7 10, m. John Trow- 
bridge. 

Mrs. E. O. 

NOTE, 

To those inquiring for information con- 
cerning the Revolutionary service of John 
North of Farmington, Conn., (b. Oct. 5, 
1748, d. Aug. 7, 1840; son of Samuel 
North, b. 1708, d. Sept. 15, 1783), the 
following may be of interest. 

'• My grandfather, John North of Farm- 
ington, Conn., (b. 1748, d. 1840), often 
told me that when Burgoyne made his in- 
vasion there was a call for troops, and he^ 
as a minute-man, volunteered and went 
to Saratoga, and was present at Burgoyne 's 
surrender at Bemis's Heights. He then 
returned to Farmington and was the man 
w^ho brought the first news of Burgoyne' s 
surrender. At first people did not beHeve 
him, but when the news was confirmed he 
was called "Gen. Burgoyne." He felt 
that he had to stay and work to pay the 
taxes to carry on the war. He was after- 
wards drafted and being unable to go, he 
secured a substitute, paying eighty hard 
silver dollars to him. Afterwards the sub- 
stitute received a pension. This I heard 
repeatedly from him when I was visiting 
him in Farmington, my father, John 
North of New Haven, being his second 
son. 

(Signed) James H. North, M. D., 
of Clifton Springs Sanitarium, 

Clifton Springs, N. Y. • 

July 4, 1896. 
20 



QUERIES. 

30. (a) Ingham — Ensign — Benjamin 
b. March 29, 1756, Durham, Conn. 

First wife, Ensign ; second, Anne 

Steele, who was b. Aug. 5, 1764, New 
Hartford, Conn. Wanted, ancestry of 
Benjamin and first wife. 

( b ) Griswold — Cudaback. — Socrates 
Griswold, b. Feb. 2, 1811, Rutland, Vt. 
Brothers and sisters were Horatio, La 
Fayette, Ada'ine, Evaline, Adelia and 
perhaps Benjamin. His wife's name 
was Lydia Cudaback. When were they 
m. and what was his father's name and 
ancestry ? 

M. M. G. 



31. Gilbert — Kirkland — Who were the 
parents of Lydia Gilbert who m. William 
Kirkland of Say brook? Was she a 
descendant of Hannah Bradford and 
Nathaniel Gilbert who were married in 
Duxbury, Mass , 1 709 ? This Lydia 
Gilbert had a dau. who married Joseph 
Bolles in 1760. 

Miss Julia C. Richards, 

Gales Ferry, Conn. 

32. Hotchkiss. — Newton Tibbils, b. in 
Derby Sept. 11, 1803, m. Hannah 
Johnson of Oxford, Aug. 25, 1824, d. 
Sept. 2, 1854. She married Willis 
Hotchkiss of Derby Oct. iS, 1866. 
Wanted, his father's and mother's 
names, also brothers and sisters. 

B. c. L. 

33. Mason — Corey. — Elizabeth Corey, 
b. about i778,m. in 1799 Jenks Mason 
of Plainfield, Conn., and d. at Plainfield 
in 1 8 14. Wanted, her parentage, for 
satisfactory proof of which I will give 
;^25.oo. Jenks Mason was of Swan- 
sea (Christopher,-Christopher,-Benj.,- 



290 



GENEALOGICAL DEPARTMENT. 



Sampson.) He was b. March 25, 
1762 and m. ist, Lillis Wood. 

w. M. R. 

34. (a) Rogers. — Wanted, name of 
father of Ananias Rogers who went to 
Orange Co., N. Y., from Long Island 
or Connecticut before 1775. He had 
sons, Richard, John, Augustin, Piatt 
and others. Piatt was a merchant in 
New York about 1830. 

(b) Did the Ferrier family first settle 
in Connecticut or Long Island? (be- 
tween 1700 and 1800.) What was 
name of first one of the family who 
came to this country ? 

J. F. L. 

35. Stodda7'd — Judson. — Dr. James 
Stoddard was b. (I think in Woodbury, 
Conn.) May 14, 1765, m. Mary Judson 
by whom he had five children, d. in 
Washington, Conn., in 1805. Want 
names of the children and dates of 
births and deaths. 

N. C. Stoddard, 
1 218 Logan Ave., 
Denver, Colo. 

36. (a) Goodsell—Penfield.—V>x. Pen- 
field Goodsell is mentioned in History 
of Torrington ; m. there in 1791 and 
practiced there. Records say that 
Isaac Goodsell m. Elizabeth Penfield 
in 1737 and had (3rd child) Penfield, 
b. July 2, 1742. Are both the same 
man and where did he go from Tor- 
rington ? 

(b) Goodsell. — Samuel, Dan and 
Thomas Goodsell are mentioned in 
"Conn. Men in Wars of 1776, 181 2 
and 1845." Among my ancestors are 
Dan^ b. June 16, 1724; Samuel* b, 
April 4, 1749; Thomas* b. Nov. 30. 
1746. The two latter are brothers of 
Penfield. Are these the same as the 
soldiers ? 

'' Penfield." 



37. Watrous — Bushnell. — Wanted, the 
names of ancestors, birth and death of 
Ambrose Watrous (or Waterhouse) of 
Saybrook, Conn. Were any of them 
Revolutionary soldiers? Also what 
was the full name of his wile by the 
name of Bushnell and the names of her 
ancestors and were any of them in the 
Revolutionary War? 

Mrs. Stephen C. Van Wyck, 

Fishkill Plains, N. Y. 

TyZ. (a) Butler. — A family by the name 
of Butler lived in Hartford about 1780. 
There i, Mary, who m. James Welles; 
2, William ; 3, Daniel, who removed to 
Northampton, Mass. ; 4, Henry, who 
removed to Blandford, Mass. Who 
were their parents and general an- 
cestors? 

(b) Clapp. — Capt. John Clapp, a 
a sailing master, lived in Hartford about 
1790 and is said to have died at sea 
and been buried at New London, (Jonn. 
His children were i, Rhoda (Taylor) ; 
2, Jane ( Seymour) ; 3, George ; 4, John ; 
5, Russell ; 6, Emma (Myers) ; 7, Mabel 
(Sharp) . Who was Capt. Clapp's wife 
and who were their ancestors? 
Henry L. Butler, 
Philadelphia, Penn. 



39. Ingraham. — Isaac Ingraham of Bran- 
foid. Conn., m. April 1736, widow 
Hannah Bartholomew, b. Jones, being 
her third husband, her first husband 

being . Williams. They had four 

children, i, Mary, b. 1737, m. David 
Foote ; 2, Sybil, (supposed by some to 
be a Williams or a Bartholomew) sup- 
posed to have m. David Tyler ; 3, Isaac, 
b. Sept. 1742, d. Sept. 28, 1794, m. 
Rachael Hickox ; and 4, Elizabeth, who 
died unm. aged 24. Wanted, parentage 
and birthplace of Isaac, who m. widow 
Bartholomew, and some positive in- 
formation regarding Sybil and her 
descendants. 

R. H. I. 



CURRENT EVENTS. 



Nathan Hale's Day at East Haddam. 

THE memory of Nathan Hale, the 
young Connecticut hero who risked 
and lost his life in the service of his coun- 
try received a most impressive tribute in 
the ceremonies attendant upon the pres- 
entation of his monument to the town of 
East Haddam and the dedication to the 
uses of the Sons of the Revolution, Con- 
necticut Society, of the school house in 
which he taught after leaving Yale Col- 
lege. 

The day, June 6th, 1900, will long be 
remembered by all who were present as an 
occasion of great historical interest and it 
was but in keeping with the beautiful 
sentiment that animated all hearts that 
nature too should be at her best for no 
brighter day could have been wished for 
than that which greeted the thousands 
gathered to do honor to Connecticut's 
martyr hero. It is interesting to note that 
these ceremonies were made a part of 
East Haddam's celebration of the bi-cen- 
tennial of its separate existence as a town. 

It was a gala occasion indeed ! Gov- 
ernor Lounsbury with his escort of the 
First Company Governor's Foot Guard, 
the New York and Connecticut Societies 
of the Sons of the Revolution, the hun- 
dreds of school children dressed in white 
and decorated with the national colors 
and the thousands of enthusiastic visitors 
made an inspiring sight to be treasured 
by those who witnessed it as one of the 
most cherished moments of their lives. 

The celebration opened with an his- 
torical account of the separation of the 
town from Haddam by Rollin N. Tyler 



of Haddam. Judge Attwood's paper on 
the Nathan Hale School House, written 
in a reminiscent vein, was then read by 
his daughter and was most enthusiastically 
received. Following this was a well ren- 
dered poem by Miss Attwood, entitled 
"The Romance of the School House." 
" Joe " Cone, a native of East Haddam, 
followed Miss Attwood with two poems, 
one in a serious vein entitled, " Nathan 
Hale," and the other a humorous piece 
entitled "Two Hundred Years Ago." 

The reading of these poems elicited 
hearty applause. 

Following this was the historical ad- 
dress of the day by the Hon. E. Emory 
Johnson in which he gave an extended 
account of the town's history. With this 
was closed the exercises in the hall and 
a procession was then formed and 
marched to the Village Park where the 
presentation of Enoch S. Wood's bronze 
bust of Nathan Hale to the town took 
place. The bust was unveiled by Mrs. 
Marcellus Hartley of New York, a grand 
neice of Nathan Hale. The exercises 
opened with singing the " Star Spangled 
Banner " by the school children under 
the direction of Prof. R. R. Cone. As 
the last strains of the old familiar song 
passed away Wilham E. Nichols stepped 
forward and on behalf of the citizens of 
the town presented the bust to the town 
in a short and eloquent address as follows : 

Friends and Fellow Citizens : On this 
spot one hundred and twenty-seven years 
ago, Nathan Hale taught the youth of 
East Haddam. Here he came an un- 
known lad of eighteen, fresh from the 
inspiration of his training at Yale. Here 



291 



292 



CURRENT EVENTS. 



his life work began and here today he is 
still teaching the lesson of patriotism. 

In memory of his manliness, in memory 
of his courage, in memory of his self- 
sacrifice we raise this monument. 

The music of these children's voices is 
a tribute to Hale the schoolmaster ; it is 
fitting that the children should gather 
here around the original site of the old 
school house ; it is fitting that they should 
sing the song of the flag, the song of the 
country in defense of which Hale's life 



P^i 



iSK^^s/^am 



wm^ 






ESCORT TO GOVERNOR LOUNSBURY, COM- 
ING UP THE ROAD. 

was offered as a sacrifice. No truer man 
lived than this schoolmaster of East 
Haddam. Here was no vain glory-seek- 
ing hero, but a gentle, strong man, who 
went gladly to an ignominious end. 

The sculptor has most happily expressed 
all the fire and strength and courage that 
was in the man ; some day perhaps some 
boy about this monument will catch an 
inspiration from the face of Hale, and 
thoughts shall be translated into action. 

We have with us today a true daughter 
of the Revolution, a grand niece of 
Nathan Hale, Mrs. Marcellus Hartley, 



who will now unveil the bust. In the 
name of the citizens of East Haddam, 
who are the donors of this bronze, I com- 
mit it to the care and keeping of this 
town. 

The response was by Francis H. 
Parker, a native of East Haddam, and 
now United States District Attorney of 
Hartford, who said : 

In the name and on behalf of the goodly 
people of this ancient town, I accept from 
you and your associates this worthy and 
enduring memorial of a hero who in the 
path of duty feared not to die the inglori- 
ous death of a spy. From your filial hands 
the town gratefully receives to its watch 
and ward this gift of love and loyalty, 
promising to hold it as a sacred trust 
forever. It is meet that upon the very 
spot where Hale kept school during his 
residence in this town, a commemorative 
statute should be placed to preserve his 
memory and hand down to those who 
shall follow us the lessons of his brief but 
heroic life. This noble statue is not a 
monument to the memory of Hale alone ; 
standing in this public place, it will tell 
from day to day the story of a patriot's 
life, forever mute ; from its silent lips will 
come the words, '' sweet and seemly it is 
to die for the fatherland." It will kindle 
anew the fires of patriotism and men 
looking upon it will go forth if need be 
to live the life and die the deaths of 
heroes. Our gratitude goes out to you 
for this noble gift which so dignifies and 
enriches our bi-centennial exercises and 
permanently dignifies and adorns our 
town. In taking it into our care and 
keeping we pledge ourselves to guard, 
protect and preserve it forever. 

After partaking of a bountiful lunch 
prepared by the citizens of the town, the 
invited guests marched to Hale Mem- 
orial Park, a beautiful location overlook- 
ing the Connecticut River, where the 



CURRENT EVENTS. 



?93 



exercises connected with the transfer of 
the school house in which Nathan Hale 
taught from the possession of the New 
York Society Sons of the Revolution to 
the Connecticut S. of R. Society. The 
schoolhouse had been remodeled to insure 
its return, as nearly as possible, to the 



Hale" was read, prefaced by original 
lines by the author, Judge Francis M. 
Finch, dean of the Law School of Cornell 
University and one of the best known 
Yale men of the country. 

Dr. Edward Everett Hale was to have 
delivered the address of the afternoon. 




SCENE AT THE PRESENTATION OF THE BUST OF NATHAN HALE TO THE 
TOWN OF EAST HADDAM. 



form it was in Hale's time by Richard 
Henry Greene, of New York. He had it 
painted a true little ''red schoolhouse 
color," and now stands on the brow of 
one of the most picturesque and beauti- 
ful spots on the river. 

After prayer by Rev. Dr. Warren of the 
New York Society, the poem *' Nathan 



but was unable to attend. Evereit Ab- 
bott, of New York, read a letter from him 
in which he said that the case of the 
young man, Nathan Hale, had no parallel 
in the history of the world. His tragic 
fate was of the greatest distress to his 
brother, Dr. Hale's grandfather, and the 
tragedy was never mentioned in his fam- 



294 



CURRENT EVENTS. 



ily by his express ' order. Consequently 
all the boys of the village where Dr. Hale's 
father was brought up knew More of the 
story than any of the Hale family. Young 
Hale was born to be a soldier, and he had 
in him the loftiest conception of the duty 
of an educated young man. It was to the 
credit of the town of East Haddam that 
the memory of his early teaching days 
was to be honored. '^■ 

Victor H. Paltsit of the New York Lib- 
rary, who has been engaged for some 
years in preparing a life of Nathan Hale, 
delivered an address on "Nathan Hale, 
the Schoolmaster,'- being a chapter from 
his forthcoming work arranged for the oc- 
casion. 

The presentation of the school building 
to the Connecticut S. of R. next followed. 
Morris B. Ferris of the New York Society, 
in a quiet and informal manner, presented 
the deeds of the building to Morgan G. 
Bulkeley, president of the Connecticut 
Society, who, in accepting the gift, spoke 
as follows : 

''Mr. President: With the grateful 
acknowledgments of the Sons ot the Re- 
volution of the State of Connecticut I ac- 
cept from you this deed which conveys to 
the future care and custody of our society 
this building and the ground upon which 
it is now located, rendered historic from 
its association with the early manhood 
life of Nathan Hale. The comity which 
induced your society to relinquish its 
ownership and to entrust it to our care 
we most highly appreciate, and we feel 
deeply indebted to that member of your 
society through whose instrumentality this 
building has been re-located on this beau- 
tiful spot and restored as far as may be to 
its original condition. 

" Supplemental to this gift your society 
has this day had placed in its hands deeds 
of these surrounding acres bordering and 
overlooking this river and its charming 



scenery, and which we propose as rapidly 
as circumstances will permit, to lay out 
and decorate as a public park to be 
known as the Nathan Hale Memorial 
Park, for the uses and pleasures of the 
people who reside here, and where 
we can gather for patriotic and other oc- 
casions. I need not assure you, Mr. Pre- 
sident, that the latchstring of , the ol^ 
schoolhouse with that of our ancestriil 
homes will always hang outside the door 
for the members of the New York Society 
of the Sons of the Revolution. 

'' Citizens of East Haddam : This day, 
these exercises, this building, the monu- 
ment this morning unveiled, all become 
centennial milestones in the history of 
the early parish and later town ; this 
schoolhouse following clbsely, if not hand 
in hand, with the church in early colonial 
days when contrasted with those of more 
modern times and construction, illustrates 
the progress of all our Connecticut edu- 
cational interests for more than a century. 
It is possible that here, in this quiet, 
beautiful hamlet Hale gathered that in- 
spiration which marked the thread of his 
future life and services to his country. 
The bronze bust of the martyr spy, with 
its granite foundations (yet to be erected) 
will stand on the original site of this 
schoolhouse for the years to come as a 
memorial to the gentle Hfe which Hale sO' 
unselfishly gave to the cause of liberty. 
This park will be open for your pleasure^ 
and now that we have enjoyed the gener- 
ous hospitality of the good people of this 
town, you need not be surprised if the 
sons continue their pilgrimages hither- 
ward. 

" To the Sons of the Revolution : This 
building and these grounds, beautiful as 
we hope to make them, are to be the 
future home of our society. The neces- 
sary preliminary steps have already been 
taken to provide for holding here our an. 



CURRENT EVENTS. 



295- 



nual gatherings. In fact, we propose to 
make this our Mecca. And not to be 
alone in our patriotic work I have on be- 
half of the Sons tendered to the Daugh- 
ters of the American Revolution, who 
have this day organized a chapter in 
this town and vicinity, the use of this 
building and these grounds, not unsel- 
fishly, but in the belief that in their or- 
ganization we shall find the helpmeets 
that we shall need in the care, develop- 
ment and perpetuation of these memo- 
rials. 



indomitable courage in the face of ex- 
traordinary circumstances and of un- 
swerving loyalty to the state and to his 
native town of EastHaddam. In passing 
comment upon the affairs of the state 
Governor Lounsbury expressed the hope 
that the Connecticut River, which was so 
beautiful from the hilltop, might be given 
its God-given right to flow unpolluted to 
the sea by action of the states, through 
which it flows. 

The closing address was made by Rich- 
ard Henry Greene of the New York 




SCEN:e AT THE DEDICATION OF THE NATHAN HALE SCHOOL-HOUSE. 



^* In conclusion, Mr. President, permit 
me to extend, on behalf of the New York 
and Connecticut societies of the Sons of 
the Revolution, heartfelt thanks to the 
citizens of East Haddam, men and women 
alike, for their cordial greeting and gen- 
erous hospitality." 

At the conclusion of Mr. Bulkeley's ad- 
dress Governor Lounsbury was introduced 
by ex-Governor Bulkeley and made a 
brief address in which he extolled the 
value of sentiment in controlling the 
destinies of the world and compHmented 
his predecessor in the governor's chair 
of eight and ten years ago as a man of 



society, who said that he was glad to be 
upon the platform on the old hill overlook- 
ing theConnecticut with his old playmate, 
ex-Governor Bulkeley, and his classmate, 
Governor Lounsbury. It was a marvelous 
thing, this gathering together of people 
from far and near, this pausing of the in- 
dustries of the town, because something 
over a hundred years ago a mere boy, iS 
years old, taught the youth of the town 
for a few months in this old school house. 
It was worthy of note that of all the 
teachers who taught in the hundred years 
in the service of that school house, only 
one man is remembered, and he is re- 



296 



CURRENT EVENTS, 



membered because there was pulsating in 
his heart the life blood of patriotism 
which in turn had pulsated through the 
nation. The lessons taught by his life 
and by his death of ignominy were of the 
highest and greatest purpose, and mean 
to the people of this land today that pa- 
triotism following duty hves eternally. 
Even as the sacrifice of the life of Christ 
was for a purpose, so was the sacrifice of 
Hale. 



NEW D. A. R. CHAPTER. 



NATHAN HALE MEMORIAL CHAPTER ORGAN- 
IZED AT EAST HADDAM. 



One of the interesting features of the 
Nathan Hale celebration at East Had- 
dam, last week, was the organization of a 
new chapter of the Daughters of the 
American Revolution under the name of 
Nathan Hale Memorial Chapter. The 
project was started in the town some five 
years ago by Mrs. Richard Henry Greene 
of New York City, an enthusiast in patri- 
otic woik. Failing to arouse sufficient 
patriotism, she abandoned it for a time, 
devoting her energies to organizing the 
Knickerbocker Chapter, Daughters of the 
American Revolution, of New York City. 
During the revival of patriotic sentiment 
in connection with the presentation of the 
old schoolhouse where Nathan Hale first 
taught, several women of the town re- 



quested Mrs. Greene to resume the plans 
she has originated for them, being desir- 
ous that the chapter should be organized 
on the hero's birthday. Correspondence 
was opened with the State regent of Con- 
necticut. The absence of Mrs. McKin- 
ney in Paris at first seemed an obstacle, 
but Mrs. Greene soon ascertained that her 
work had been left in the hands of Mrs. 
George B. Newcomb, register of the State 
of Connecticut, who took up the matter 
with great enthusiasm, and at the request 
of Mrs. Greene was present at the cele- 
bration. 

After the regular programme the chair- 
man announced that the women eligible 
to be Daughters would assemble in the 
newly dedicated building to receive in- 
structions from Mrs. Newcomb. Much to 
the delight of all interested, after Mrs. 
Newcomb had taken the chair, a telegram 
was received from the National Board of 
Washington, authorizing the formation of 
the chapter, whereupon the Nathan Hale 
Memorial Chapter was established and 
the officers were elected. The Sons of 
the Revolution have granted the use of 
the building free of expense. 

Mrs. John M. Holcombe, regent of 
Ruth Wyllys Chapter ; Mrs. Morgan G. 
Bulkeley of Hartford ; Mrs. Antoinette 
Ward, regent of Simsbury Chapter ; Mrs. 
Richard Henry Greene, Miss Greene, 
Mrs. Marcellus Hartley, Miss Julia Vaille 
of New York City, and other Daughters 
were present to greet the new chapter. 




FLORICULTURE. 



We'll make you as welcome as the flowers in May. 



BY REV. MAGEE PRATT. 



THERE is no gift of nature bestowed 
upon us simply for purpose of en- 
joyment ; every glowing beauty of sea and 
sky is a lesson of life ; the radiant sheen 
■of the gold-tinted sunset pregnant with 
moral meaning ; the flower-dappled paths 
we tread speak to us of hope and duty, 
the whole lustrous world of God His 
school where we are trained for higher 
things. There are two simple thoughts 
we would do well to remember through 
all the plenteous life of spring,and jewelled 
pride of bloom that glorifies the summer 
days : the first, that it is the privilege and 
duty of every person to make the environ- 
ment of human life as full of the splendor 
of beauty as possible ; the next, that the 
whole personal effort should be directed 
to train and perfect the will and work of 
ourselves and all we influence that men 
may not be an ugly outrage upon the per- 
fection of the garden of God wherein we 
walk. 

The ease of culture that is in the prom- 
ise of the best of our flowers when they 
-come to us asking for shelter in our 
jhomes, in return for their ministry of 
peace and blessing, should induce us all 
to welcome them. 

There should be no homes without Ut- 
erature, music, and flowers. But the 
flowers can be had with less cost of money 
and care than the other essentials to an 
harmonious life. What is more beautiful 
297 



than that special home flower, the Glox- 
inia? It is a child of the summer, daugh- 
ter of the tropics ; yet as a loving visitor, 
makes itself quite al home in our northern 
homes. It can be grown from seed, with 
much care, but for the amateur the wisest 
plan is to buy the corms. Let the con- 
cave top just show above the earth in 
your flower pot; never let water touch 
the leaves, nor give too much sun, 
and it will bloom freely. Its flowers are 
cups of alabaster or ruby or azure flecked 
with gold or spotted with the sunset 
and filled with all the charms of a poet's 
dream. 

If the summer sun pours into our win- 
dows for hours in the July days perhaps 
we cannot well screen them with flowers, 
but for a window in partial shade we 
should have a flower box made to fit the 
sill, eight inches wide and deep ; at the 
bottom of the box put an inch of broken 
flower pots or large cinders for drainage, 
have holes to let out superfluous water and 
then fill with light, good earth. Put in 
the center a rich-colored Coleus, then 
some ferns with light and feathery fronds. 
A Vernon Begonia or two, and deep, full 
scarlet geraniums ; near the front edge 
some Tradiscantia, and one or two of the 
best Nasturtiums to hang down the front. 
Fill up with plants that will make as much 
contrast in color of leaf and flower as 
possible. Reject all with dull foliage, 



298 



FLORICULTURE. 



and all rank growers, and the result will 
be a source of pleasure to every person 
gifted with the longing for beautiful 
things. The one who cares for the ex- 
hibit will be a benefactor to every passer- 
by, wearied with the hot burden and glare 
of the noonday sun. 

The months of July and August are 
largely for enjoyment and fruition. They 
are the holiday of the floriculturist, the 
harvest time of the garden, but the fall 
and winter will come, and it is best to 
prepare for them. If you have one good 
Crysanthemum you can, even as late as 
July I St, make sure of a dozen by the 
time they bloom. Pick off the side 







VIEW OF THE BORDER OF THE GARDEN 
SAVAGE, WETHERSFIEI.D. THE SCHOOI, 
REAR. SEE I.AST ISSUE. 
Photographed by Albert Morgan. 

shoots and the ends of the branches and 
make plants of them ; they will grow 
quickly and flower in the proper time. 

The easiest way to root cuttings of all 
sorts by the amateur is to fill a flower pot 
with coarse white sand and pack it hard 
in the pot, putting your cuttings around 
the rim so that every one touches the pot 
on its inside edge. In summer keep in 
the shade, and be sure they do not dry 
out. When rooted put in 2-inch pots, 
and as the roots grow, shift to 4-inch or 



larger, for the pot plant only partially 
disbud. One gawky flower on a walking 
stick decorated with leaves is not my idea 
of grace or comliness. Nor do you want 
a great cluster of bloom, each small as 
daisies. Three or four on a shoot is 
the ideal growth. 

If you want geraniums for winter bloom 
some of the recent introduction^ are 
nearly perfect. Those shown at the 
green house at Elizabeth Park last winter 
were just superb. Make your cuttings 
now ; root, pot and grow as crysanthe- 
mums, only be sure and pinch out the 
flower shoots as they come for the first 
four months, and you will have stocky 
plants that in a hght win- 
dow where the sun can kiss 
them warmly will smile for 
you with rays of color a 
Christmas and New Year's 
greeting. 

The crab apple has always 
been regarded as a sort of 
poor relation of the rose ;. 
though of the same family 
the superb perfection of the 
one prevented all thought of 
rivalry by the simplicity of 
the other, though each are 
beautiful. But to my sur- 
prise, I find that the apple is 
no longer content with the 
inferior position, and by the 
development of its latent qualities is 
claiming equality with the Queen of 
Flowers. 

You may have a yard of roses, double 
and fragrant, pearl white, with a pink 
blush of conscious loveliness, if you buy 
the double flowering crab. (Bechtels va- 
riety) . It blooms when only shrub high^ 
is quite hardy, and I think unequaled in 
the whole garland of spring bloom. 

I am learning that the most foolish ver- 
dict a man can pronounce about anything: 



OF W. M. 
IN THE 



FLORICULTURE. 



299 



is to affirm that it is good for nothing. 
That used to be my opinion of the peony. 
I thought it dull in color, coarse in tex- 
ture and arrogant in size. But the Japa- 
nese have changed all that, and the new 
Tree Peonies that come from the land of 
flowers ar€ altogether charming. There 
are carmine pinks that look as if they 
were woven out of silk ; pearl white, ruddy 
crimson and all shades of delicate tender 
color, as soft and radiant as roses. They 
are not very costly, are easily cared for 
and hardy. The chief thing in their cul- 
ture is to see that shoots from the roots do 
not outgrow the graft. The root shoots 
must be carefully cut away, or they will 
kill the grafted flower ; as common, coarse 
things have a habit of doing to better 
ones. The foliage is different in root and 
graft, so the work is easily done. 

Why do people grow the common Pe- 
tunia, when the variety introduced by that 
very skillful lady florist, Mrs. T. Shepherd, 
of California, is so much better that they 
hardly seem to belong to the same family. 
The colors are gorgeous ; the bloom large, 
and their spotted and flecked adornment 
make them a pleasure to the eye and satis- 
faction to the mind. 



One dollar extra spent in seeds is worth 
one hundred dollars in pleasure and con- 
tentment to all sensible persons, who, how- 
ever they may differ in some things, agree 
in this : that they want the best of every- 
thing they can get. 

It is a good thing to work when we 
ought and must ; it is a better thing to 
enjoy the fruit of our labors. No one 
can properly appreciate a garden who 
does not plan and delve to produce its 
pictured peace. You need not work 
much now. The fragrance of the roses 
fills the air ; drink it in, it is heaven's own 
tonic for a weary heart. The pearly bells 
of the lillies ring out a chime of gladness 
to those whose ears are attuned to celes- 
tial melodies. Listen to it often, forgetting 
the hoarse noises of the market places of 
the world. 

You can gather more than fair flowers 
in your gardens if you remember who it 
was that once in eventide walked in one 
with the innocent in the long ago. 
Perhaps He may come again to you in 
yours if you go there in quest of Him with 
a quiet and loving heart. 

Magee Pratt. 





=].|=lg]r:|],=l,=l|=]ni]||di=l.^r=l.^ndBJJ,=J.=|l;=l^ 




=lnd.=l.=lriJ.=li= l|Sl|=!fa!l5t 

lilt -ii.ii.gA. 



EDITORIAL NOTES. 



NATHAN ttALlE. 



We have given con- 
siderable space in this 
number to occurrences 
Connected with Na- 
than Hale, tjndef the heading of Cur- 
rent Events We give an account of the 
celebration of Nathan Hale Day at East 
Haddam, on June 6th. In another place 
we present a sketch of the closing scenes 
of Nathan Hale's life, by Miss Charlotte 
Molyneux Holloway, editor of The New 
London Telegraph. Francis H. Parker, a 
native of East Haddam and now U. S. 
District Attorney, Hartford, contributes 
a sketch entitled "The Hale School 
House." We have tried to do honor to 
the memory of one of the noblest acts of 
self-sacrifice known to man, but how poor 
are words, how insignificant must appear 
the efforts of even the most capable and 
eloquent among us who essay to pay a 
just meed of tribute to the work of the 
martyr hero. Nathan Hale with his fine 
and lofty character, the openness of his 
life, the intellectual man, the officer and 
the gentleman ; Nathan Hale with his 
glorious youth and the promise of a 
splendid career before him, steps forward, 
a volunteer, and dons the noisome garb 
of a spy and goes forth to die for his 
country an ignoble death — Oh the pathos 
of it! 



It may be that civil- 
THE SALE OF izcd nations who have 
ARMS TO CHINA, been selling arms and 
munitions of war to 
China may have a horrifying return for 
their trade. To a nation as unstable 
as China, with its hordes of half savage 
people, steeped as it has been in centuries 
of superstition and hatred of foreigners, 
it would seem the height of foolhardiness 
to supply with the means of destruction 
as embodied in modern implements of 
war. But that is just what has been done. 
The air is rife with terrible forebodings of 
evil — a great war, the war of Eastern 
savagery against Western civilization, 
which can only be put down at the price 
of thousands of valuable and heroic lives. 
We consider it a crime to sell arma- 
ments to savages, such as the lower ele- 
ments of the Chinese undoubtedly are. 
We speak advisedly when we say savages. 
We so designate them in the sense that 
being as a nation notoriously indifferent 
to human life, that thinks nothing of the 
torture of human beings for even trivial 
causes, they are in that degree beyond the 
pale of civilization, and therefore, savages ; 
albeit, savages with a scheme of philos- 
ophy, a government, a literature and a re- 
cord for general intelligence that staggers 
the mind by the contrast it offers to the 



300 



EDITORIAL NOTES.. 



joi 



practical working of the Chinese charac- 
ter. Furnish these people with the means 
and the opportunity for evil will present 
itself just so sure as treachery and 
heathenism and ignorance are synonymous 
terms. It matters not that there are wise 
statesmen and sober-minded, rational and 
just citizens in the empire, the fact re- 
mains that the Chinese masses, are but 
little removed from savagery and thus 
can be easily led to all manner of exces- 
ses, needing only a leader to spur them 
on. 

It would appear that the Western world 
can claim no sympathy if the lives of 
its citizens are ruthlessly taken and the 
story of another horrible massacre is told, 
and it is shown that they, for the sake of a 
little additional wealth, sold armaments to 
such a race as the Mongolians have 
proved themselves to be. 



* 
* * 



Thackeray, if he 
THE GENTLEMAN Were alive to-day and 
vs. could be prevailed 

THE SNOB. upon to take a stroll 
along Broadway or 
Fifth Avenue, New York ; Walnut Street, 
Philadelphia, or walk within the exclusive 
district of Bean Hill, Boston, or go South 
and West and take in some, in fact, any 
one, of the largest, and to all outward ap- 
pearances, the most polished of cities^ 
putting in an hour's walk here and there 
along the most select thoroughfares, 
would see even within that short space of 
time more lack of good manners, more 
sham courtesy, more vulgar arrogance, 
more downright meanness and hypocrisy, 
more evil things, that go to make up his 
conception of a snob than his wildest 
dream could evolve. 

A snob — we know him, (and "her", 
too, for there are female snobs, mind you) 
a parvenue incarnate, the parasite of the 



age, they cling to> allconditiiDns of society ; 
to the well-born no less than to those of 
doubtful origin. No class seems able to 
escape its sHmy embrace : the law, the 
medical profession, even the church, the 
domain of education, the mart of trade — 
all professions, all activities feel the blight,. 
and among these are individuals who bear, 
the stamp of old and illustrious families,, 
who are college-bred, who are successful 
in their material efforts,, who hold the key 
to all that is generous, courteous and: 
lofty, who yet prefer to descend to the 
level of an unmannerly set of cads, a fact 
that can be determined by any resolute 
man who cares to investigate the subject.. 

There are snobs and snobs. Some have 
the polish of a Chesterfield, others the 
roughness of a drunken buccaneer I We 
see them everywhere, a well-fed, well- 
groomed and well-housed conglomeration 
of meaness and vulgarity, as effusive in, 
their flunkyism to those above them, as 
they are insulting and insolent to those 
who are less well established. 

Come with us and. shadow one of these 
outwardly- made- up gentlemen, let him be 
either a rich lawyer, doctor, clergyman, 
educator or merchant, it boots not which.. 
Now look, here comes a decent and hon- 
est man, but one who is threadbare and 
for the time being unsuccessful and poor.. 
The blood that courses his veins is a white 
man's blood, clean and pure, and maybe 
carries with it the tone of a long line of 
illustrious progenitors, but, alas ! the man^ 
is poor. Now, watch the half way, the 
unwilHng recognition accorded him, or 
note the cut direct^ or the mean and 
sneaking averted head, all one and the 
same in its contemptible Httleness and 
vulgarity !; Any man of mature years who. 
has traveled much, who has been a close 
observer, will bear out this statement that 
whole communities are being infested; 
with the rank growth of what may not in-. 



302 



EDITORAL NOTES. 



aptly be termed " Snobism." The frank 
and friendly interchange of greetings, the 
polite and dignified salutations that in 
other times were accorded even to strang- 
ers on the highway give way to cold, 
averted looks, the deliberate snub and 
the half and unwilling recognition — all so 
mean and sneaking that your manly man 
itches to give those guilty of the act a 
public reprimand. 

Step with us into a crowded street car 
for a moment and watch the actions of a 
certain rich man's son. See, he passes a 
young woman stenographer with whom 
he is acquainted, giving her a curt saluta- 
tion and not so much as touching his hat, 
and then five minutes later is seen stand- 
ing up and bowing effusively, hat in hand, 
to a bevy of young ladies of w,ealth, to 
judge by appearances, who had then en- 
tered the car. We see the look of wounded 
pride in the young stenographer's face, we 
note the nervous bite of the lip to con- 
ceal her chagrin and our blood boils in the 
effort to restrain the inclination to correct 
the unmannerly cad. Such incidents as 
these can be multipKed indefinitely, and 
the wonder is that society is able to stand 
the mudslinging and still keep its coun- 
tenance. 

And now the question arises, what does 
all this portend ? Does it not augur the 
complete elimination from our life as a 
people of that quality of chivalry to which 
we all point with pride as old school man- 
ners, and manliness ; as something un- 
common — a lost art? We might look to 
our colleges and our churches for some 
check to this deplorable state of affairs, 
but even here, as we have before hinted, 
we are met with examples of lack of true 
courtesy that makes us waver in our hope 
for much aid in this direction. Yale, 
Harvard and Princeton, aye, the whole 
list of our large seats of learning, instead 
of being the democratic institutions they 



claim to be and turning out as ' a rule men 
with genuine courtesy and chivalry, are 
giving us to-day cliques, large and small, 
of arrogant and insolent youngsters who 
place the dollar mark as the open sesame 
to their good graces and good behavior, 
in a word, who are unblushing cads. 
These are pretty strong words, but they fit 
the situation, so far as it has come under 
our observation, and it is the experience of 
many others who have been approached 
on the subject. 

What is demanded, we think, is that in 
educating our children the matter of heart 
culture should occupy a more important 
place than seems to obtain under present 
conditions. We strive with all our might 
to develop brain and muscular tissue ; we 
spend fortunes to advance intellectual 
standards, but do nothing worth recording 
to promote heart culture. The results are 
so manifest that now when any man of 
note does some little act of courtesy — 
steps down from his lofty height to show 
a little feeling for less fortunate people, 
it is straightway taken up by the press 
and heralded from one end of the country 
to the other as something out of the 
common. A little inductive reasoning 
will show that there is something radically 
wrong in our character as a people that 
this should be so. Are we to become a 
nation of cads or gentlemen ? 



The young man or 
woman who is the 
fortunate possessor of 
an abundance of 
health, weaith and leisure ; if he or she 
would be in the swim, must take to — 
not water, but the golf links. He would 
be an exceedingly tiresome person indeed 
who would not grow enthusiastic over the 
manner in which our rich cousins are now 
amusing themselves. 



GOLF. 



EDITORAL NOTES, 



303 



By all means let the sport grow on 
apace ; let our athletic and clever 
maidens develop their long dormant 
little muscles ; let our stalwart lads vie 
with old gray heads in demolishing rec- 
ords ; let golf courses, with their wide, 
ever-rolling greens, their shady and in- 
viting nooks, their sweet odors of nature's 
countless perfume bearers — let these 
bright breathing spots increase and multi- 
ply, let golf have full sway for golf is king ! 
Long live Golf ! 



There is going the 

THE RIGHT WAY rounds of the news- 

TO TREAT papers a very pretty 

OUR SERVANTS, story of a wealthy 

Japanese gentleman, 

who makes it a point to give the servants 



of his household a dinner from time to 
time in which all his family as guests join. 
Sitting at the head of the table he relates 
all the news of the day, gives accounts of 
any travels he may have taken, and en- 
livens the whole with humorous jokes and 
pleasantries, and then when the dinner 
has been eaten takes leave of all with a 
fine gentleness and consideration for their 
welfare, and an invitation to dine again 
in the near future. It is said that this 
particular Japanese household is the best 
managed in the world. How many Con- 
necticut families treat their servants in 
such a fashion as this ? Not many, we 
venture to assert. 



BOOK NOTES AND REWIEWS. 



A Hand Book of Practical Sugges- 
tions FOR THE USE OF STUDENTS IN 

Genealogy, by Henry R. Stiles, i vol' 
12 mo. 55 pp., cloth. Postpaid, $i.oo. 
Joel Munsell's Sons, Publishers, Albany, 
N. Y. "This little manual," say the 
author in the preface, " is written in re- 
sponse to the question so often put by 
intending genealogists of both sexes- 
' How do you go to work to get up a 
genealogy? ' " Though written especially 
for beginners, it has many valuable sug- 
gestions, by which even the experienced 
may profit. It is a valuable book for all 
engaged in the line of genealogical and 
historical research. 



A History and Genealogical Record 
of the Alling — Allens of New Haven, 
Conn. The Descendants of Roger 
Alling, ist. and John Alling, Sen., from 
1639 TO 1899. Compiled by Geo. P. 
Allen, No. Woodbury, Conn. 317 pp. 
Cloth bound. May be had of the com- 
piler. Price ^3.00. For several years 
Mr. Allen has been at work on the above, 
and the result shows the large amount of 
labor and care he has put into it. The 
book is a credit to the author in the high 
standard of typographical excellence, as 
well as in genealogical completeness and 
accuracy. Notwithstanding this com- 
pleteness, Mr. Allen requests all of the 
Ailing — Allens in America to collect and 
call his attention to anything in the shape 
of old letters, documents or traditional 
lore bearing upon the history of the 
family, and he will compile it for an 
appendix to the present book. This 



genealogy is thoroughly indexed and em- 
bellished by several portraits of members, 
of the family. 



Supplement to John Lee of Farming- 
ton, Conn., and his Descendants. (1634 
-1900.) Compiled by Leonard Lee. 
175 pp. Cloth. Price, ^1.50. Maybe 
obtained by addressing Wm. Wallace Lee, 
Secretary " Lee Association," Meriden, 
Conn. 

In 1897 was published the book to 
which this is the supplement, the latter 
bringing things down to date with num- 
erous additions and corrections. It has 
many illustrations and is well gotten up 
being as complete and accurate as the 
utmost care could produce. Like the 
main book, it is a model of its kind and 
is a good example to show the advisabil- 
ity of many genealogical books having a 
supplement which, mores the pity, is so 
seldom published. Mr. Leonard Lee, 
Mr. Wm. Wallace Lee and their associates 
in the work have shown a commendable 
spirit in the preparation and publication 
of their family books. 



A Brief History of the Ancestors 
AND Descendants of John Roseboom 
( 1 739-1 805) AND of Jesse Johnson 
( 1 745-1832). Compiled by Catherine 
Roseboom and others. 140 pp. Cloth 
60 cents, paper 30 cents. Address C. 
Roseboom, Cherry Valley, N. Y. For 
the objects of preserving to the descend- 
ants of Hendrick Janse Roseboom of Al- 



304 



BOOK NOTES AND REVIEWS. 



305 



bany, N. Y., and Captain John Johnson 
of Roxbury, Mass., the information ob- 
tainable regarding their early history in 
iVmerica and to afford as complete a 
record as possible of the famihes com- 
prising the later generations, from about 
the time when the two lines were united 
by the marriage of Abraham Roseboom 
and Ruth Johnson in Cherry Valley, 
N. Y., in 1806, has the above book been 
prepared. It is an interesting book, the 
biographical sketches being much more 
extended than is usually found in such 
works. 



* 



The Grant Family Magazine, edited 
and published by Arthur Hastings Grant, 
41 Church St., Montclair, New Jersey, 
^i.oo a year. Bi-monthly. Began with 
February, 1900. A very good way to 
make more complete a family genealogy 
has been adopted by the editor of the 
Grant Family History. This most noted 
family, having its origin in America in 
Old Windsor has a most wonderful history 
and a periodical devoted to its record, 
enables the family to keep up the interest, 
become better acquainted with each 
other, and preserve many things of im- 
portance which would otherwise be lost. 



Ye Antient Buriall Place- of New 
London, Conn., by Edward Prentis, New 
London, Conn. 40 pp. Cloth. Price 
$2.00. Most attractively gotten up with 
many fine illustrations, and one excep- 
tionally large one giving a view of the 
whole " Buriall Place," is this book of in- 
scriptions of the oldest cemetery in the 
southeastern part of Connecticut and the 
most important one genealogically in that 
part of the state. It is a book that com- 
mends itself to everyone at all interested 



in local history and from the care taken 
in its preparation and production is 
worthy of a place in the library of all so 
inclined. 



The Bird-Stone Ceremonial by War- 
ren King Moorehead, Saranac Lake, N. Y. 
31 PP- 53 illustrations. Paper, 40 cents. 
An account of some singular prehistoric 
art facts found in the United States and 
Canada. This is the first of a proposed 
series of bulletins on a very interesting 
subject — hitherto almost entirely neg- 
lected in archaeological literature — 
comprehensively written and fully illus- 
trated. Mr. Moocehead has made the 
subject attractive for all interested in pre- 
historic relics, whether they be experi- 
enced archaeologists or non-professional 
collectors. 



Despite the fact that the New England 
element in Wisconsin is small in point of 
numbers and its population is made up 
largely of those of foreign birth or extrac- 
tion, all its institutions are distinctively 
American, and the New England influence 
has been strongly felt throughout the 
state. In an interesting paper on '' New 
England in Wisconsin," in the June New 
England Magazine, Mr. Ellis Baker Usher 
explains that this is true because so many 
of Wisconsin's prominent men have been 
from New England stock. His article is 
chiefly biographical in character, sketching 
briefly the lives of many who ha\e been 
leaders in the political, educational and 
industrial life of Wisconsin, — all typical 
New Englanders. With many portraits 
in this connection are also included 
views of the University of Wisconsin, 
which may well be called a New Eng- 
land institution. Warren F. Kellogg, 5 
Park Square, Boston, Mass. 



3o6 



THE HOME, 



The June number of the Chatauquan 
contains among its usual interesting 
matter a valuable paper by Francis N. 
Thorpe entitled " Forgotten Candidates 
for President " that will appeal most 
strongly to those who delve in historical 
lore, at the same time, the general reader 
will not be slow to express his apprecia- 
tion for the pleasure derived from the 
perusal of the article. The paper is hand- 
somely illustrated with portraits. Another 
interesting paper is that entitled " The 
Treason of Benedict Arnold," by Dora 
M. Townsend, that won the first prize 
(one hundred dollars) offfered by the 



publishers of The Chatauquan for the 
best answer to the question, ''What 
is the most dramatic incident in Amer- 
ican history?" The competition was 
open to all subscribers of The Cha- 
tauquan and articles were limited to one 
thousand words in length. The results 
of the competition reveal a number of in- 
teresting facts, which The Chautauquan 
makes a point of stating in full for the 
benefit of its readers. The winners of 
the other prizes are named and their 
essays are printed the whole affording 
most interesting reading. 



THE HOME. 



ENTERTAINMENT. 



MARKETING. 



ECONOMY. 



BY LOUISE W. BUNCE. 



Any inquiries regarding these subjects, or 
Magazine, will gladly be answered through these 

WHEN meat is a vexation, drink a 
delusion and repose well nigh 
impossible, the hostess must look well to 
the ways of her household and endeavor 
to tempt the fitful appetite by varieties of 
food that are unusual, cool and sustaining. 

A salt relish for breakfast, a delicate 
luncheon, and a more solid meal at the 
end of the day with ample time for diges- 
tion is most to be desired. Also during 
the hot weather the appetite for a refresh- 
ing drink is often more keen than for or- 
dinarily acceptable food and no consider- 
ation of the home comfort could well 
pass over this feature of agreeable living. 

In this issue of the Connecticut Maga- 
zine I shall therefore give some tried 
recipes for drinkables both old and new, 



requests for receipts, addressed to The Connecticut 
columns. 

alcoholic and non-alcohohc which may 
meet a flagging appetite if indeed they do 
not create one and which will serve many 
a hostess a good turn in the entertainment 
of summer guests. 

The fruits at this season offer many 
hints as to the preparation of summer 
beverages and the housekeeper who is 
laying by a winter store of preserves may 
concoct many good things. For instance 
in the making of currant jelly the scum 
rising to the top of the kettle, after adding 
sugar to the fruit, which would ordinarily 
be thrown away, if saved and set away to 
cool with a third as much water as scum 
makes a very palatable currant shrub. 
The juice or scum should be set away in 
a bowl on the ice and fifteen minutes be- 



THE HOME. 



307 



fore using be very carefully strained 
through a cloth and to a pint and a half 
of juice have added half a bowl 
of fine .chopped or shaved ice and 
the last moment a bottle of club soda. 
Stir violently with a spoon to thoroughly 
mix, and serve very cold. Club soda, 
procurable at any grocer's, makes a very 
desirable component of all summer drinks, 
is easily managed, comes in right quanti- 
ties for home consumption, is reasonable 
in price and very pleasantly effervescent. 

The Williams Root Beer and Extracts 
are almost too well known to be treated 
of in these columns and form a feature of 
all summer preparations. With the bottle 
of Root Beer Extract comes a recipe for 
making this most healthful and delightful 
drink which if followed minutely cannot 
be improved upon. 

Kremette is another extract lately put 
upon the market, obtainable at all leading 
groceries and this added to fruit juice or 
claret makes a new and to many untried 
punch which will cool many a dusty 
throat. 

Not forgetful of tea which makes a most 
agreeable luncheon drink when iced I 
would recommend a brand called Russian 
Oolong, procurable in half-pound foil 
lined packages of the importers, Lincoln 
Seyms & Co., or of any established grocery 
house. 

Allow in making a teaspoon of tea for 
each person and one for the pot. Draw 
the tea clear and strong, allow the juice 
of a lemon for two persons squeezing the 
juice into the hot tea. Add a sufficient 
amount of sugar to sweeten to taste and 
set away on the ice undiluted by having 
any ice in the pitcher. To make it of 
thoroughly '* Russian" chaiacter add be- 
fore serving an overflowing teaspoon of 
St. Croix Rum to each glass and in this 
case the drink is improved by being 
shaken in a covered shaker with a little 
cracked ice. This is a most healthful as 
well as refreshing drink. 



During the months of August and early 
September we are apt to have sudden 
changes of weather, occasioning exposure 
to colds and consequent physical disturb- 
ances for which an excellent preventive is 
found in a home-made cordial from the 
field blackberry. This fruit coming in 
July is abundant in August as though 
beneficent nature had appointed the 
remedy to meet the demand. I have in 
my possession an old family recipe for 
the compounding of this cordial which 
like the cordial itself has improved with 
age and give it here in toto : 

For each quart of blackberries allow a 
gill of water and cook slowly, long enough 
to break up the fruit and evaporate the 
water. Express the juice of the berries 
through a coarse Russia towel. Return 
the juice to a porcelain kettle, bring to a 
boil, allow a half pint of sugar to a quart 
of juice, scald once sufficiently to blend 
the sugar and cool. A few blades of cin- 
namon and six whole cloves may be added 
to each quart but this is optional. When 
cold add a pint of best French brandy to 
three pints of the blackberry juice and 
cork tightly for future use. It is a disad- 
vantage to have this cordial too sweet and 
sugar may be added in using. Serve with 
shaved ice as often as agreeable. 

Raspberry shrub is another home made 
drink, delightful with climbing of the mer- 
cury, and is prepared as follows : To 
three quarts of red raspberries add one 
quart oi the best cider vinegar. Let all 
stand three days, strain and add a pound 
of sugar to a pint of juice ; bring the juice 
to a boil, skim carefully and bottle for 
future use. The amount of juice to be 
used in one glass of water is left to the in- 
dividual taste ; it is both palatable and 
cooling. 

Served at a dinner recently in place of 

punch was a beverage called " The Bride's 

Kiss," and a more inviting drink, both as 

to name and substance, can scarcely be 

Continued on next page. 




HAVE 

YOU 

kTRltD 



over 
of good 
living will 
find in this ar- 
ticle a delicious 
and palatable ad- 
dition to their dinner 
or evening entertain- 
ment. A little -Kremette," added to 
a punch-glass of vanilla ice cream, 
will give you the successor to the 
Roman Punch. If you want some- 
thing distinctly new, serve your 
guests with " Kremette Punch." 

For Sale by All Grocers. 
G. F. Heublein & Bro., Sole Proprs. 

Hartford, Conn. New York, N.Y. 




TRY. 




a$2 Cut^ for 



SAFE AND SURE. ^ A combination of 
Celery and other harmless ingredients. ^^J^ 
ONE-HALF the price of other remedies. «^^ 

3 Cures, 5c; 7 Cures, JOc; 20 Cures, 25c. by mail 
to any address in the United States on receipt of 
price. 

EASY CURE CO-, ^^^^ 

HARTFORD, CONN. 



ONE WILL CONVINCE. 

Sold by agents only, or 
mailed on receipt ot price. 

Free Catalogue. 

Write tor terms. 

Season now on. 



Windsor Collar & Cuff Co., Windsor, Ct. 





CUTS AT HALF PRICE. 

The Connecticut Magazine offers for sale 
at half price cuts that are now on hand which 
have appeared in past issues of the magazine. 
Write for Prices. 

The Connecticut Magazine, Hartford, Ct. 



[home department.] 

imagined. It was prepared in the follow- 
ing way and I must insist upon its being 
carefully done. Take an orange, which 
must be ice cold, and with a sharp knife 
separate the skin from the fruit, not, how- 
ever, entirely removing it. Open the sec- 
tions to the base, like the petals of a 
flower, and the sections themselves treat 
in the same way. Place the orange in the 
bottom of a deep champagne glass and 
pour over it equal quantities of maras- 
chino, curacas and brandy. On top place 
a small square of ice cream dotted with 
two or three brandied cherries. Serve 
with a spoon and after the cherries and 
cream are eaten drink the liquid portion. 
The orange in the meantime has absorbed 
a good share of the liquor and the fruit 
may then be crushed with the spoon and 
will be found delightfully fragrant. 

For persons who are fond of the flavor 
of mint I append an excellent rule for 
making a julep : Put in the bottom of a 
large tumbler one or two pieces of pine- 
apple, nicely pared, and cover them with 
a thick layer of loaf sugar ; pour on it a 
wineglassful of the best brandy, and add 
water till the tumbler is two-thirds full ; 
finish with a thick layer of pounded ice ; 
then stick down at the side a bunch of 
fresh mint and put in the other side a 
straw or glass tube. 

Then, of course, there are all sorts of 
beverages put together with milk or eggs 
or both as a basis, but I believe these are 
too well known to need comment or ex- 
planation, and there is also the old 
fashioned Candle. For this drink mix 
two spoonfuls of oatmeal in a quart of 
water, with a blade or two of mace, and a 
piece of lemon peel ; stir it often, and let 
it boil twenty minutes ; strain and sweeten 
and add a little white wine, nutmeg and 
a little lempn juice. 

In conclusion I must touch for a moment 
upon the use of coffee as a cooling ele- 
ment in a dinner simply suggesting chilled 
coffee as a drink and passing on to a 
''parfait" and a "mousse" for which I 
append reliable receipts. I should sug- 
gest the purchase of Union Club Coffee as 
being of guaranteed quaUty and make a 
" parfait " as follows : A parfait is easily 
made as it does not require to be stirred 
while freezing. Put the beaten yolks of 
five eggs into a sauce-pan, add four table- 
spoons of very strong black coffee liquid ; 
sweeten to taste ; stir the mixture over a 

Continued on next page. 



Please mention the Connecticut Ma&azine when you write to advertisers. 




Grown at Ridgeland, 
South Carolina, 

Are the strongest, best rooted field 
grown plants in America. The soil 
and climate seem to just suit them, 
and they make a wonderful growth 
of tops and roots We grow all the 
best varieties, old and new, for open 
ground planting, both on their own 
roots and worked very low on dis- 
budded stocks. 

$3.00 a dozen. 
$20.00 a hundred. 

No person who loves a fine bed of 
roses should fail to get our new de- 
scriptive priced catalogue which will 
be mailed free by addressing 

W. B. WALLACE, Nurseryman, 
Hartford, Conn. 




PRISCILLA COMPOUND 
CLEANSES ♦ FINE ♦ FABRICS. 

It fhould be used exclusively in washing ai't 
embroideries, laces, linens, s'lks and all other 
fine and delicate fabrics, whose preservation 
depends upon extremely careful handling. 

Priscilla Compound not only cleanses per- 
fectly but removes discolorations, improves 
faded colors, gives a bright lustre to silks, and 
a fine grass bleach to linens. It will not injure 
the finest fabric in the slightest degree. 

Ask for it at the Art Stores and Embroidery 
Departments. If you do not find it send us 
25 cents for a half-pound box and catalogue 
of useful Embroidery Novelties. 

Write for our free booklet, "The Story of 
Priscilla," after Longfellow. 

Priscilla Mfg. Co.. Hartford. Conn.. 

Manufacturers of Expansion Hoops, Universal 
HoopJHolders, Embroidery Sets and Novelties. 

wmmmmmmmmm 



SUFFERERS from NERVOUS DISEASES 

Find this an 
Ideal Home. 




Cbe Tariiilngton Ualley Sanatoiium, gg^„"*^"'^ 

The latest scientific and most approved methods are used. 

The large, handsome house is very cheerful, airy, newly 
furnished throughout; and there are spacious verandas on the 
first and second stories. The Farmington River winds through 
the grounds, and on all sides are beauty and quiet. The 
pure spring water is plentiful, and the air invigorating. The 
drives in all directions are unsurpassed. Pteferences from 
patients cured and other information will be cheerfully given, 
on request. Address, Dr. P. D. Peltier, Hartford, Conn. 

''QRBY TOWERS," 

STAMFORD, CONN. 

(50 minutes from New York City.) 

FOR MENTAL AND 

NERVOUS DISEASES. 

With a separate detached department for ALCOHOI^IG 
and DRUG HABITUES. Under new management of 
experienced competent alienists. Splendid location, 
overlooking the Sound and City. Rates reasonable for 
excellent accommodations. Alcoholic and drug habi- 
tues can commit themselves, or be legally committed, 
for one year or less. For terms and information, 
apply to 

Dr. F. H. BARNBS, Stamford, Conn. 

New York City office: 154 West 34th St. Office hours 

from 2 to 3.30 daily. New York City Telephone: 

38o3-38th St. Stamford Telephone: 104-4. 

Thousands of 
refined ladies 
are using 

A wonderful preparation for permanently curing pim- 
ples and blackheads. It effectually removes Tan, 
Freckles and Moth Patches. Try it yourself. Write 
to-day to The H. K. HALE TO., Box 25, Hartford, 
Vt., for a SLuall bottle free. 



State of Ohio, City of Toledo, I 
L,UCAS County. \ 



FREE! 



Royal Pearl, 



K J. 

oft 



partner of the firm of F. J. Cheney & Co., doing busi- 
ness in the City of Toledo, Countv and State aforesaid, 
and that said firm will pay the sum of ONE HUNDRED 
DOIylvARS for each and every case of Catarrh that can- 
not be cured bj' the use of H.-\.ll's C.\t.\rrh Cure. 
FRANK J. CHENEY. 

Sworn to before me and subscribed in mv presence, 
this 6th day of December, A. D. 18S6. 



I SE.\L. i 



A. W. GIvEASON. 

Notary Public. 



Hall's Catarrh Cure is taken internally and acts 
directly on the blood and mucous surfaces of'the system. 
Send for testimonials free. 

F. J. CHENEY & CO.. Toledo, O. 

t»~Sold by Druggists, 75c. 

Hall's Family Pills are the best. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when yon write to advertisers. 



Wanted, Agents. 



Heaps of money for good 
Agents. Kither sex to sell 
- COLOR FAST," article 

nearly every woman will buy. Sets all colors in all 

fabrics so they look same as new after being washed. 

Won't injure the most delicate goods. Sample 25 cts. 

Circulars free. 



EUREKA NOVELTY CO,, Dept. D, 
207 Gratiot Ave.; Detroit, Mich. 



WANTED. 



Families to write us for 
free illustrated catalogue 
of GOOD THINGS FOR HOUSEKEEPERS. 



SHUMWAY CO., 



70 Center St. 
Ne-w Haven, Conn. 



Waverly Bids., T21 Mail 
Hariford, Conn. 



St. 



WANTED. 



SALARY 



A limited number of No.'s 3 and 4 of Vol. 2, and No.'s 
3 and 4 of Vol. 4, of The Connecticut Quarterly, for which we 
will pay a Reasonable Price. 

THE CONNECTICUT MAGAZINE, Hartford, Conn. 

A YEAR, SURE PAY FOR 
HONEST SERVICE, 
t7Pn an straight, BONA-FIDE 

Cp/ OU^UU GUARANTEED SALARY 

H Several trustworthy men or women wanted in each stateS 
iato travel for us. to secure new and look after old business g 
gSalary, straight guaranteed $780.00 a year and expenses. g 
g Eight years in business require us to have a competent^ 
gcorps of travelers to handle our rapidly growing business. g 
jgReferences. Enclose self-adressed stamped envelope. g 

a THE DOMINION CO.. Wept. F, CHICAGO. Q 



^IIRC DnD INSECT 

o u n L r u r powder 

is guaranteed to kill Cockroaches 
Water Bugs, etc. Prepaid to any 
address on receipt of ^5 Cents. 

ADOLPH ISAACSEN & SON 

64 Pulton St., New York. 



[71)17 1.^ Five papers of good Sewing Needles by 
1^ i\£!/iZ/ mail, pospaid, FREK to anyone sending 
us only 10 cents to pay for a three 
month's subscription to our magazine. Address, 

Urcada magazine €0., martin, micb. Dcpt. B. 3. 




PILES 



If you have got the PILES, you 
have not used Daniels Sure Pile 
Cure, or you would not have them 
NOW. The only Guaranteed Cure. 
No detention from business, no op- 
eration, no opium or morphine. Twelve Suppositories .50c, or 
24 and box of ointment $1.00. postpaid by mail. Send for book 
of valuable information on Piles, FREE, whether you use our 
remedy or not. 

THE DAN1EI.S SURE PILE CURE CO., 

284 Asylum St., Hartford, Conn. 



7 WIVES-'----- -- 

JLJlLLLIt^Mjc«ni,. E. C. FINK CO..; 



S. *.iuo pages, illustrated with 
itjng book pablished. Prepaid 
203N.OgdenSt., Buffalo, N.Y. 



Can Yon Do It? 
Number 10 Puzzle. 

The most fascinating 
and instructive puzzle 
ever put on the mar- 
ket. Sealed direc- 
tions with each. Sent 
to any address on 
receipt of 15c. 

Chas. B. Elmorb, Drawer 56, Hartford, Conn. 




[home department.] 

slow fire till thick enough to coat a spoon. 
Turn out and beat till cold and light ; add 
a pint of cream whipped to a stiff froth, 
pour into any convenient mould, cover 
tight and pack in chopped ice and salt for 
four hours. ^ 

For a mousse. To a teacupful of strong 
coffee add the beaten yolks of two eggs 
and three ounces of powdered sugar ; set 
the bowl containing this into a sauce pan 
of boiling water and let it thicken ; it will 
take five minutes. Then add a table- 
spoonful of gelatine previously soaked in 
two of cold water ; cool the mixture and 
add a pint of cream whipped to a stiff 
froth ; set the whole into cracked ice. 
When thick pour into a mould and pack 
in ice and salt half an hour if you wish it 
chilled, or two hours if you desire it frozen. 




PUBLISHERS' NOTES. 



The people of all civilized nations are now inter- 
ested in the world famous Paris Exposition. Connec- 
ticut people are naturally interested to know what part 
this State is taking in the doings of this great congress 
of all nationalities. The Connecticut Magazine has 



iWI 



* 






GERTRUDE ElylZABETH DANIEI.. 

engaged Gertrude Elizabeth Daniel of Hartford, who 
is now at the Exposition, to contribute a series of three 
letters which will appear in the three remaining is- 
sues of this year. Mrs. Daniel is very versatile in her 

Continued on next page. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



'<^. 



iplLLANTBuHu 



For Polishing 
Silverware, 
rass &.C)pperwa 



A Free Sample to Introduce It. 

This famous French polish has been 
used in Europe for more than thirty 
years, and has won many medals at 
various expositions. 

The manufacturers have recently 
introduced it in this country with 
marvelous results. It is put up in two 
forms, liquid and powder. 

Ask your dealer for it, or send 15 
cents for one-half pint bottle Supe- 
rior Polish for Copperware, Brass 
and Tinware; or send 10 cents for 
full size Impalpable Powder tor 
gold, silver, silver-plated ware, jew- 
elry or cutlery. Both polishes abso- 
lutely non-poisonous and harmless. 

Send postal for sample 

THE BRILLANT BUHLER CO., 

82 Pearl St., Hartford, Conn. 




WEDDING INVITATIONS, l^p^W^'^ir'^S.^rtl 

premises. Also Monograms, Crests, Address Dies. 
Stamping done in all colors. Formerly with Tiffany, 
Dempsey & Carroll. Engrossing a specialty. 



To Repair 
Broken Arti- 
cles use 




Major's 
CemeDt 

Remember 
MAJOR'S 
RUBBER 
CEMENT, 
MAJOR'S 
LEATHER 
CEMENT. 



♦ 

\ 
X 

♦ 

I 
I 



FOUR of the SIXTY ARTICLES GIVEN AWAY with 




UNION CLUB COFFEE. 



These are of STERLIA^G SIL VER and made by one of the 
most reliable silverware manufacturers in the country. 

This Coffee is a choice blend of private grown varieties. Selected, 
blendedt roasted and packed under our personal supervision. 



Always in air-tight cans. 
Save the COUPONS for Premiums. 



Leading grocers. 
Send for Premium List. 



LINCOLN, SEYMS & CO., Hartford, Conn. 




\ 
X 

♦ 

X 

♦ 

I 
I 



Please msntion The CoNNJScriCjr Magazinb when writing to advertisers. 



The Boston Cooking 
School Magazine . . . 




JANET M. HILL, 
Editor. 



The Official Organ 
of the Boston Cook- 
ing School* 



The first periodical to present original dishes 
by means of half tone illustrations. 

Each number consists of about eighty pages, 
and contains articles on household topics, culinary 
science and hygiene, from writers of authority on 
the various lines treated. It contains practical and 
seasonable menus, and the BOSTON COOKINQ= 
SCHOOL'S most recent and choicest recipes, which 
will not be obtainable through other sources. 



Subscription Price, 50c. per year 

Send for a Sample Copy« 

Boston Cooking School Magazine, 
372 Boylston Street, - Boston, Mass. 



^M^^EEiin 



A $50 SOL!D COLD 

OM\ll///yy rnttR'NC with cenu- 

^^WMC^ ■■fcfc iNE DIAMOND SET 

■-^''•-S'-''?«^^-^ °^ a Solid Gold Watch (Waltham or Elgin). 

~^^-. A ^A -* ivr- We are sending out these costly gifts to intro- 

duce our magazine into 100,000 more homes, 
^end us your name and address with a strip 
of paper the size of your finger, enclose 10 
cents to pay postage, and we will send you our 
magazine -3 months on trial, our offer of this 
one Cupids Stick Pin and our Sweetheart Love Charm 
SEND AT ONCE as this offer is good only 
mber of subscribers. If you are not in 
e will retur-' -mir 10 cents. Address, 

BJ , Martin, Mich. 




handsome watch an 
(just imported from Paris) 
until we have securf d the desired 
time to be one of the lucky on 

UKEADA MAGAZINE, Dept 



FREOKLES 

I" this great enemy of beaut: - 

UlLLmAN FRECKLE CREAM CO. , Dept t, 



positively removed by 

using Stillman's Cream. 

Prepared especially for 

3 great enemy of beauty. Write for particulars, 

kN FRECKLE CREAM CO., Dept t. AURORA, ILLS. 




18 BEAUTIFUL 

PHOTO ENGRAVINGS 

IN TINTS. 

Illustrating the 32- 
page booklet "The 
Lord's Prayer in the 
Sign Language." 
Will interest young 
or old. Printed on 
finest quality coated 
paper. Postpaid to 
any addiess, 15 cts. 

Conn. Magazine Co., 
Hartford. Conn. 



IMPROVED DDIICU 

LAMP CHIMNEY DnUjni 



14 inches long, crowds in any 
Chimney, fills space, polishes bright. Sample 10 cents, 1 doz. 60c., postpaid. 
3doz. Jl.fK), or 12 doz. for |;<.60 by exp Agents make big pay. III. Catalogue 
ofNoveltie8,Trick9,Wig8& Plays free. C. E. MAR8HALL,Mfr.,Lockport,N.Y. 



[PUBI^ISHERS' NOTBS.] 



writing and has been identified in educational 
matters in the State for some years. Our readers may 
expect much of interest in this series. 



CORRECTION. 

The tomb of Governor Samuel Huntington is in the 
old grave yard, Norwich Town, not Norwich, as we 
have it on page 251. 



"SELF CULTURE" CHANGES TITLE. 

With the July issue the publishers propose to 
change the title of the Self Culture Magazine to 
Modern Culture Magazine. It is done with some 
reluctance, since in making the alteration an old and 
now familiar designation is parted with, under which 
for five years the Magazine has not only prospered in 
a remarkable degree, but has had the most agree- 
able relations with its myriad friendly, courteous, and 
most appreciative readers. Why, then, it may be 
asked, is the change made? Partly from a miscon- 
ception, in many sections of the United States where 
the periodical is making new friends, of the aims and 
character of the Magazine,— some mistaking the pub- 
lication for one devoted to physical culture ; and partly 
from the broadening of the scope of the publication, 
which in each inception was designed to address those 
chiefly who sought to educate themselves by self-effort. 

As heretofore, the Magazine will be the organ of no 
party or creed ; the paramount aim of its owners being 
to make the publication a Magazine for every thought- 
ful and well-ordered home, while seeking to promote 
independence in the discussion of public affairs, inter- 
est in literary questions, and an intelligent concern for 
all that makes for the uplifting of the people and for 
the material and social advancement of the Nation 
Subscription price, only $1.00 per year ; four months' 
trial, 25 cents. THE WERNER COMPANY, 

Publishers, Akron, Ohio. 

Few handsome residences are constructed nowadays 
without the compliment of a stretch of good lawn. To 
keep the lawn beautiful requires no little attention. 
There has recently been put on the market a lawn 
sprinkler called the "Twin Comet" which will 
sprinkle an area four times greater than any other 
sprinkler made. It is made by the E. Stebbins Mfg. 
Co. of Springfield, Mass., and retails at $5.00. The 
sprinkler is a marvel in its line, and is meeting with 
universal approval among property owners. 

We are in receipt of a letter from Mr. Major, the 
famous cement man, of New York, in which he sets 
forth soine very interesting facts about Major's Ce- 
ment. 

Mr. Major tells us that one of the elements of his ce" 
ment costs $3.75 a pound, and another costs $2.65 a gal- 
lon, while a large share of the so-called cements and 
liquid glue upon the market are nothing more than 
sixteen-cent glue, dissolved in water or citric acid, 
and, in some cases, altered slightly in color and odor 
by the addition of cheap and useless materials. 

Major's cement retails at fifteen cents and twenty-five 
cents a bottle. 

If you are at all handy (and you will be likely to fine 
that you are a good deal more so than you imagine) 
you can repair your rubber boots and family shoes, 
and any other rubber and leather articles, with Major's 
Rubber Cement and Major's IvCather Cement. 

And you will be surprised at how many dollars a 
year you will thus save. 

If your druggist can't supply you, it will be for- 
warded by mail ; either kind. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



SOMETHING HEVft^t^ 




100 



Beautifully Printed 
Personal or Business 
Cards not to exceed 3 
lines, in fine black 
ink, in any style type 
shown on this sheet, 
with Card Case, your 
name in gold leaf on 
flap, using Crane's «*■ 
plv Ivory Finish 
White Bristol Board, 
by mail, postage paid 
to any address for 

$1.00 

Stamps Preferred. 



YOUR CHOICE 

IN CARD CASES. 

Furnished in plain 
leather: Black, Buff, 
Brown, Red, and Blue. 
Alligator, Seal Orain 
— all hand made and 
of fine leather. Size, 
I'M X 3 inches closed. 



STYLES 

OF TYPE 

SPECIFY 
NUMBER 
WANTED 
WHEN 

ORDERING 



No. J. 


MISS 


No. 2. 


CHi 


No. 3. 




No. 4. 




No. 5. 




No. 6. 





CHILDS. 



CHARI.es henry JOHNSON. 
Fred'k Chas. Church. 

MRS. JAMES THOS. HAYES. 
MISS BELLE MAUD JONES. 
Master Wilfred Reynolds. 



This style of card is fast becoming the most fashionable. They /are 
small, neat and very convenient, (size i>^ x 2^) and can be instantly put 
in a lady's wallet without crushing or mutilating in any way. 

R. S. PECK & CO., Manufacturing stationers, 

^ Write name in printed letters. HARTFORD, CONN. 

MONEY PURSES 

FROM MAKERS TO YOU 
AT FACTORY PRICES! 




No. 70. Open.— Seal Grain. 



No. 70. Ivady or Gent's 
Pocket Book. Made in 
Seal Grain, Morocco, 
TM 7n r-i J n» ^^^* Skin — light and 

No. 70. Closed.— Morocco. dark colors — and in 

Pig Skin. Very fashionable, and small size 2)4 x 31^. 
3 copartments, round corners. Bv, mail, (stamps pre- 
ferred) for 70 ct8. Your name in gold for 15 cts. extra. 
No. 44. Closed.— Seal Grain. 



POCKET 
BOOKS 
ARE AN 
INCEN- 
TIVE TO 
SAVE. 



No. 44. Gent's Pocket Book — Seal Grain, flap, four stitched bellows pockets, leather 
lined, round corners, by mail, (Stamps preferred) for 44 cents, s copartmen*s, is 
well made and of pretty size and flexible. 41 4 x 2%. Your name in Gold. 15 cts. extra. 

Address the Hanufacturers, R. S. PECK & CO., Hartford, Conn. 









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A:| <1 



Six Thousand Years of History* 

There are TWO REASONS why this work, 
published by E. R. DuMont & Co., is a most 
timely one: — 



FIRST : It comes at the moment when the greatest changes of modern 
times are taking place in the attitudes of the nations — changes so momentous 
that all our knowledge of the world's past history must be drawn upon for 
intelligent forecast of the future. 

SECOND : The time is peculiarly fitting for the bringing out of a 
history written as Plutarch would have written it— the first work ever pub- 
lished which enables the writer to obtain a comprehensive grasp of the World's 
history without a prolonged and systematic course of study, for which no busy 
person has time. 

This work is in ten octavo volumes of about five hundred pages, each 
handsomely illustrated with photogravures of the celebrities of antiquity, as 
well as of modern times, and reproductions of many great historical paintings 
by the World's famous artists, as well as a number of valuable historical maps. 

No other History has been built upon so fine a foundation of ability, 
peculiar fitness and careful conscientious work. In authoritativeness, style, 
point of view, and all other features which go to make up an attractive and 
intensely interesting history of the world, " Six Thousand Years of History " 
is without a rival. It represents the labors of the foremost specialists of the 
United States. 

The work has been prepared and edited by Bdgar Sanderson, A. M., 
author of "History of the British Empire; " J. P. I^amberton, A. M., author 
of "Historic Characters of Famous Events," "Literature of All Nations," 
etc., John McGovern, author of "Golden Legacy," "The Toiler's Diadem," 
" Famous American Statesmen," and the following eminent American editors 
and writers: Joseph M. Rogers, A. M., Laurence E. Green, M. A. Lane, G. 
Seneca Jones, A. M., Frederick Logan and W. M. Handy. Introduction by 
Marshall S. Snow, A. M., Professor of History, Washington University, and 
Dean of the College, author of " City Government," " Political Studies," etc., 
etc., making a title page which is a guarantee that the w^ork has been most 
ably edited. 

The entire set is now completed and the work of introduction has been 
delegated to the undersigned by the publishers in advance of their subscription 
sale. We have a limited supply of Portfolios containing specimen pages and 
illustrations from the work, which we will send, together with full particulars 
of the unique plan of introduction adopted, to the first applicants. 

For Portfolios and particulars ADDRESS 

National Adverti sing Union 

not Chestnut Street %h^m%h^ Philadelphia, Pa» 



Please mention Thk Connecticut Magazine when you write to adyertisers. 



..TAPESTRY PAINTINGS.. 

2000 Tapestry Paintings to Choose From* 30 Artists 
Employed, including Gold Medalists of the Paris Salon* 

When in New York don't fail to call and see these paintings. You will be welcomed. Make this 
place a point of interest. We rent Tapestry Paintings. Send 25c. for Compendium of J 40 Studies. 

* mutk Rome Decorations * 



"VVT- can show you effects NEVER before thought 



of, and at moderate prices too. 



\X7ln\7 ^*^® 79^^ house decorated and painted by 
»V liy inferior workmen, when you can have it 
done by skilled workmen— by artists — for the same 
price. 



Write for Color Schemes, Designs, Estimates. ARTISTS SENT TO 
ALL PARTS OF THE WORLD, to execute every sort of Deco- 
rating and painting. We are educating the Country in Color 
Harmony. 

Wall Paper, Stained Glass, 
Relief, Carpets, Furniture, 
Parquetry Tiles, Window Shades, 
Art Hangings, Draperies, Etc» 



VVT tj TD^ --.«*»« New styles designed by gold medal artists 
W ail r apcrS» cents per roll up Send 50 cents to prep 
age on large sam 



From 10 
prepay express- 
iple books and drapery. A quantity of last year's paper 
$1 and $2 "per roll; now 10 and 25 cents. Will include drapery samples in 
package. See our Antique Metalic, French, Pressed Silks, and Lida effects 
in special colors to match all kinds of woodwork, carpets and draperies. Have 
5u0 different wall hangings with draperies specially made at our Broomhead 
Mills, Patterson, N. jT, to match. 

pv^ „_ •-_ We have Draperies to match all wall papers from 15 cents 
L/rapeneS* a yard. This is a very important feature to attain the 
acme of artistic excellence in decoration. No matter how much or how 
little you want to spend you must have harmony of form and colorings. 
Write us for samples. Special Silk Draperies made at our Broomhead Mills, 
Paterson, N. J. Encourage Home Industry ? Write us for samples. 

HTiiniXjtfV Milf^ff;:it^ We manufacture Tapestry Materials. Supe- 
i d-pcbiry IVlctLCIlctlb* nor to foreign goods and half the price. 
Book of samples, 10 cents. Send $1.50 for trial order, for 2 yards of .50-inch 
wide No. 6 goods, worth $3.00. 

V\i>rr\i*i:tii\Te> AA\rir^ '-^P^^ receipt of th Mr. Douthitt will answer 
J-yC^UIilLlVC iiUVlL^C* any question on interior decorations— color- 
harmony and harmony of form, harmony of wall coverings, carpets, curtains, tiles, furniture, 
gas fixtures, etc. 

Manual of Art Decorations. ■''plg'e1''ZVUt''h Si% SerKi" 

tions of modern home interiors and studies. Price, $2. If you want to be up in decoration 
send $2 for this book, worth $50. 

^rl-»rkr»l ^^^ 3-hour tapestry painting lessons, in studio, $5. Complete written iastruc- 
Ot,llUUl« tions by mail $1. Tapestry paintings rented; full size drawings, paints, 
brushes, etc., supplied. Nowhere, Paris not accepted, are such advantages offered pupils. 
Send $1 for complete instructions in tapestry painting and compendium of J 40 studies. 

r^oWm Printorl 'Rtit*tiir«c ^"^^^ ^^^ ^^"^ ^*yl®^ *^^ ^'*^^ covermgs, at 25 cents 
O-ODlin I'riniea OUriapS* per yard, 35 inches wide, thus costing the same 
as wall paper at $1 per roll. 240 kinds of Japanese Lida leather papers, at $2 per roll. 

rirkkt-Jr» At»f T^f*':ir\t>f*\T Gtrecian. Russian, Venetian, Brazilian, Roman, Rococco, 
VJUUllll r\Tl l^rctpcry* Dresden, Festoon College Stripe, Marie Antoinette, 
ludian, Calcutta, Bombay, Delft, Soudan, from 10 cents a yard to 75 cents. 

In order that we may introduce this line of NEW ART GOODS, we will send one yard 
each of 50 different kinds of our most, choice Patterns for $7.50. 



^JmJKt^ 



John F. Douthitt, t^f^JcT"' 

286 Fifth Avenue New York. Near 30th St. 




Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



What Ails Your Hair ? 



Upon receipt of 10 cents in silver or stamps and this blank filled out, and enclosing a 
small sample of your hair (4 to 6 hairs) extracted by the roots, we will send you a FREE 
BOTTLE of Cranitonic Hair Food by mail prepaid and a FREE REPORT upon the condition 
oi your hair after scientific microscopical examination by our Bacteriologibts. 



: Name , 



: Married or Single 

:: Have you Dandruff f. 



City or Town. 
Sex 



State. 
Age . 



Is it Greasy or Scaly I 



Is your hair falling out f Losing color ! 

How often do you wash itf 

Does your scalp itch f Any odor f . , 



Any scaly eruptions f 

Had any serious sickness lately f. 



What is the state of your general health f. 

♦ ♦>♦♦♦««««♦««♦ ♦♦»» K » m <> M »t«<»« 



>«♦» ♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦♦< 




fllCROBELS HAVB 
^STATTACKEO 
THl^ MAIR 

A-The Hair. 
B— The Scalp. 
C— Microbes. 
D— Food Gland. 



Hair needs food to 
keep it alive. 

The food should be 
supplied by the 
blood vessels of the 
scalp which run up 
to the hair roots. 

If the roots have 
been weakened by 
the attacks of the 
scalp microbe, your 
hair falls sick, falls 
out, turns gray. 

A sure sign of ' 'hair 
disease " is dandruff. 

If dandruff is al- 
lowed to remain it 
smothers the growth 
of your hair. 

Heretofore the 
treatment of diseases 
of the Hair and Scalp 
has been a matter of 
guess-work, without 
regard to the cause. 

In the laboratories 
of the Cranitonic 
Hair Food Co., of 
New York, the only 
institute in America 
devoted to diseases 
of the hair and scalp, 
the cause of the dis- 
ease is learned by 
means of a Micro- 
scopical Examina- 
tion and a cure ef- 
fected by exact and 
scientific methods. 



From an examination of 1,000 different 
samples of human hair no fewer than 
24 different diseases of the hair and scalp 
were identified; many of them contagious 
and dangerous in the extreme. 




THE DANDRUFF MICROBE 

which causes Dandruff, followed by Falling Hair 

and Finally Baldness. 

From Photo-INIicrograph by Dr. Fahrig. 

( Copyright 1890.) 

FREE HAIR FOOD. 

The advantages of these researche.*; are 
offered free to all our readers, as the 
above Question Blank shows. 

If you wish to be cured of dandruff, to 
save your hair and grow more, write to 

CRANITONIC HAIR FOOD CO., 

526 West Broadway, New York, 

and you will get a/rtr bottle of Cranitonic 
Hair Food, by mail prepaid , with, full direc- 
tions for use, and a free report on the con- 
dition of your hair and sculp. 



Please mention Thk Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



COOK REMEDY CO. 



HAS THE ONLY 
KNOWN CURE FOR 



1^^ ■ 0^ 0^ m^ mtk if^ ■ ^i^ g^ A ■ Primary, Secondary or Tertiary 
^11 llllll Dill VII III Blood Poison P£RMANCNTL.Y 
■gill 1 1 11 I U|uUN <^UJ^^^ ill 1^ to 35 days. You 

H^B ^" ^^ ^^ ^*^ ■ ^^ ^^ ^^ can be treated at home for the same price 

^^^ ^^KKK^^t^^BIKtBK^tl^t^K^K^K^M^^^KKtl under same g"uaranty. If you prefer to 
come here we will contract to pay railroad fare and hotel bills and no charge if we fail to cure. If you have 
taken mercury, iodide potash, and still have aches and pains, Mucous Patches in mouth, 
Sore Throat, Pimples, Copper-Colored Spots, Ulcers on any part of the body, Hair 
or Eyebrows falling- out, it is this BLOOD POISON that we guarantee to cure. We 
solicit the most obstinate cases and challeng-e the world for a case we can not cure. 
This disease has always baffled the skill ot the most eminent physicians. 

Several of our most prominent public men, Kings and Emperors of foreign lands have succumbed to this 

disease even when under the treatment of the best talent unlimited wealth of nations could employ, but we 

have a SECRET REMEDY known only to ourselves. During the many years of our existence 
no less than twenty different concerns have started up to imitate our treatment, prompted by our unprece- 
dented success; to-day not one of them remains in business. 

WE STAND ALONE without a Single Successful Competitor. 

THE COOK REMEDY CO, has permanently cured thousands and has a world-wide repu-. 
tation for speedy cures, honesty and integrity. NO DECEPTION", NO FREE SAMPLiE 
CATCH, NOR C. O. D. METHODS. Advice and absolute proofs of cures and 
unbroken pledg'es sent sealed in plain packages on application. NO BRANCH OFFICES,. 

ONE MILLION DOLLARS BEHIND OUR GUARANTY. 

Address COOK REMEDY CO., 385 Masonic Temple, Chicago, 111. 



TO NEW YORK DAILY. 




Stopping at all Connecticut Riyer Landings. 



LOW RATES. 

Quick Dispatch. 

Passenger and 
Freight Line. 



SECURITY. 

COMFORT. 

REFRESHING 
SLEEP. 



Passenger Accommodations First Class. 

Shipments received on pier in New York until 6 p. 
m. and forwarded to all points mentioned on Connecti- 
cut river, and points North, East and West from Hart- 
ford. We also have through traffic arrangements with 
lines out of New York or points South and West, and 
shipments can be forwarded on through rates, and 
Bills of Lading obtained from offices of the Company. 
For Excursion Rates see daily papers. 

Hartford and New York 
Transportation Co. 

Steamers " Middletown " and "Hartford"— 
Leave Hartford from foot State St. at 5 p. m.— Leave 
New York from Pier 24, East River, at 5 p. m.— Daily 
except Sundays. 




Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 




YOUNG MAN ASK INTO FOR 
A BOND AS A FAVOR 



If you are required to give a bond, go to the 
Company giving you the strongest bond and 
lowest rate. All bonds executed promptly. 

Fidelity & Deposit Company of Maryland, 

E. S. COWLES, General Manager. 
25 PEARL STREET, HARTFORD, CONN. 




Y0UN6 MAN ASKING FOR A 

AS A BUS! NESS PROPOSmOW 



" The Leading Fire Insurance Company of America. 




WM. B. CLAKK, President. 

W. H. KING, Secretary. E. 0. WEEKS, Vice-President 

A. C. ADAMS, HENRY E. BEES, Assistant Secretaries. 



WASHINGTON RED CEDAR DOORS. 



Do you notice how the doors in your home shrink during 
the winter months, and how they swell and stick during the 
summer months. Do you know that Rackliffe Bros, ot 
New Britain, Conn., are placing on the Connecticut market 
beautiful doors made of Washington Red Cedar, which are 
guaranteed not to warp, swell or shrink. Handsome, durable, 
inexpensive. Write us for prices. 

Windows, Doors, Blinds, 
Window Frames, Art Glass, 
Polished Plate, Etc. 

RAGKLIFFE BROSi, New Britain, Conn.' 



EOUALTO THE BEST, BUT 25% CHEAPER. ASK YOUR DEALER POR IT 




It has been officially accepted tor use 
throughout Connecticut in all the pub- 
lic offices of the state. All kinds and 
colors. Bairstow Ink Company, 
166 Pearl St., Hartford, Conn. 



HALF-TONE 
PHOTO . . . 
WOOD 



ENGRAVING 



ELECTROTYPINC. 

All Done on the Premises. 

A. MUGFGRO, 177 Asylum St., Hartford, Gt. 



"The pen is mightier than the sword.' 



BESTOR'S 
GqUPEN BANK PEN ^ 



^Senil25cts. 






BESTOR'S 

GOLDEN QUILL STUB 



■SIB 

o 



^ For one dozen sample 
'■/ box of Bestor's Pens. 

^ Agents wanted. 



TJestor Pen Co., 

Hartford, Conn. 



The very latest /^ A R 7f "C 
Up-to Date 0"/\lVlll 

For Solitaire or Two 

or More Players. ^^ 

Price, - 25 Cents. 



NUMERICA 



Ask your dealer for it or 

write to 

Thomas I. Griffiths, 

Utica, N. Y. 

Price, - 25 Cents. 



PATENTS GUARANTEED 



Our fee returned if we fail. Any one sending sketch and description of 
any invention will promptly receive our opinion free concerning the patent- 
ability of same. *'How to obtain a patent" sent upon request. Patents 
secured through us advertised for sale at our expense. 

Patents taken out through us receive special notice, without charge, in 
The Patent Record, an illustrated and widely circulated journal, consulted 
by Manufacturers and Investors. 

Send for sample copy FREE. Address, 

VICTOR J. EVAHS & CO., 

(Patent Attorneys,) 
Evans BuiMing, - WASHINGTON, D. O. 

Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when vou write to advertisers. 



'foThip<^^r'or.°a^^r carey's magnesia flexible cement roofing. 

NO LEAKY 
ROOFS 

from 

SUMMER 

STORMS 

if you use Carey's 
Cement Roofing. 

It is a non-conductor 
of heat and cold, and is 
absolutely water-proof 
and fire-proof, it is very 
easily applied as the 
illustration shows. 

WITHSTANDS^ 

ALL THE 

ELEMENTS. 

FREE SAMPLES TO 
PROfERTY OWNERS. 

WRITE FOR SAMPLE TO 

JOHN B. CLAPP & SON, ei Market St., Hartford, Conn. 





A GOOD CAMERA A COMPANION. 

We have carried a stock of cameras and camera 
supplies for years and only handle reliable goods. 

FOR SURE RESULTS (^ A IVTrTn P A Q 

GET ONE OF OUR • ♦ • V^Xl.iViJJiIVxl.O* 

Splendid New I,ine of Kodaks, Premos, Pocos. 
All supplies fresh and fine— The Connecticut 
Magazine uses our plates and chemicals in its 
photographic work. 

THE BONNER -PRESTON CO., 

843 Main Street, Hartford, Conn. 



FROM 



Am SUFFERKRS 
lORPHINE. 
1 OR Arir DRUG HABIT 



Can be permanently cured at their homes without pain, publicity or detention from business. 
NATURAI. POWERS FULLY RESTORED. " " 



No opiates used 
and AL-L. NATURAIi POWERS FULL-Y RESTORED. Our free trial treatment alone cures hundreds of 
cases, and will >)e mailed free to any person suffering from a drug habit. The only scientific home treatment con- 
taining the ACTIVE LIFE PRINCIPLE. The most difficult cases successfully treated ; perfect health restored; 
results ahsoliitelv sure. All communications strictly confidential. Address HOME TREATMENT CO., 
48 West 24th St., New York City, or J. C. McALPINE, at same addre.S8. 

What a fe-w of our patients say : *' Kample junt sonc ; It Is two weeks sinoe I have touched the drug. 



**1 have not u*«<'<l one ninelc drop of 
the morphine, and have not HufTcred 
one bit; in fact, every day have felt 
Better and better." 



" I hardly know how to write you, I 
feel «o ifrateful, 80 thankful. I have 
taken the medicine exactly as pre- 
scribed* and how it has helped me." 



*'I am more than pleased with tho 
result. I rest at night splendidly and 
have no pain. Oh, what a God-sena 
to those afflicted as I have been." 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



Golf 
Goods. 




B. C. I. CLUBS 
ARE GOOD CLUBS. 
We carry them. 

Also Vardon, Spalding and Morristown 



Silvertown Golf Balls, $4.00 

Henley Golf Bails, 4.25 

Ocobo Golf Balls, 4.25 

Craig Park, Spalding and Remades. 

EVERYTHING FOR GOLFERS, 




GILLETTE BROTHERS 

COR. PEARL AND HAYNES STS. 
HARTFORD, CONN. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



\ WEAR The ^' Don't Bind'' GARTERS 

\ FOR GOLFERS AND BICYCLISTS, 




also the original and only 

"EASY" Arm Band. 



The Don't Bind Bicycle and Golf Garter is 
suitable for ladies and gentlemen. These 
garters are manufactured with special re- 
ference to, durability and elastic qualities. 
The soft elastic cord contains one large strip 
of rubber which is not affected by changes of 
temperature like ordinary elastic fabrics. 
Garters are adjustable and supplied with 
button fasteners which make them exceed- 
ingly easy to place in position. Silk in 
Colors. Black, Tan, White, Scarlet, Orange 
and Light Blue. 



Mailed on Receipt of PRICE — 35 Cents. 

THE BLAKESLEY NOVELTY CO.J^^^J^J^^^ ^Bristol, Conn«, U. S. A. 



Tho?. l^ai'nai' \ Co. 



Manufacturers of 



GOLF LEATHER 



Bark-Tanned 

Fleshers, Roans, Calf, 
Hogskins, etc* 

181 William St., and 22 Spruce St. 
NEW YORK. 



Tanneries at 

Brooklvn, N. Y, 
Luzerne, N. Y. 
Stony Creek, N. Y. 



Our Leather is 
used by all 
Professionals. 




(This IS one of the list of \ 
Thirty Church Magazines./ 



The Church Press 

(Association 



List of Thirty Church Magazines is an 
excellent proposition for the GENER- 
AL ADVERTISER wishing to reach 
influential fiimilies in cities of the 
flrst-cl.iss. Established 1S90. In- 
corporated 1893. Tenth Year. Used 
by the best advertisers in the United 
States. 

in I [If nooinij iflozines. 

Each mag-azine is published for a 
different active CHURCH, and con- 
tains local church news reading 
matter edited by the pastor. 



coiineil circuioiion 35,000 Copies m soniti 



Directly into the Homes of cul- 
tured families, and read by at least 
140,000 interested people. 

Issued by leading churches of all 
denominations in Philadelphia, New 
York, Boston, Albany, Brooklyn, 
Buffalo, Baltimore, and Washing- 
ton — all printed and managed by 

The Church 
Press Association 

At 200 So. Tenth Street, 
Tfitkdelphia, "Pa. 

An Ad. this size only costs $37.50 

month in the whole list complete. /This is another, and there 
One in., 8. c, $12 per mo., complete. \ are twenty-eight others. 



? On 





NOYES BROS, CO. 



Golf Outfits, 

Caddie Bags, Clubs and Balls 



Our Socket Drivers and 
Brassies are Entirely 
New Models. Golf Clubs 
Repaired. 



Ocobo, 

Musselburgh, 

Henley, 

Craig- Park and 

Nojes Bros. 



NOYES BROS. CO., 
905 Main Street, Hartford, Conn. 



Please mentioii The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



Remember ! 

EstabKshcd J894. 

The Golfer, Boston, 
is the oldest golf 
publication in the 
United States. 
Edited by the 
American Authority 

James Shields Murphy. 

Exclusive Articles of 
English Authority 

Horace G« Hutchinson. 

Illustrated by artists 
of note in golf also 
with photographs of 
players, houses and 
other plates of good 
interest to golfers. 

Of interest to others too. 

Seventh year of The 
Golfer begins with 
this month, and now 
is the time to order. 

Send $( and be pleased. 

The Golfer is official 
organ of the various 
golf associations and 
as such contains the 
official news and the 
views, &c., &c., &c. 

Endorsed officially first. 

The Golfer is for one 
year one dollar, and 
is worth the money. 

So say subscribers. 

Address with $i. 
The Golfer, Boston. 



Please mention The Connecticut Magazine when you write to advertisers. 



Covers Greater Area than Any Other Sprinkler Made 




mm 

nin, 

Weight 
6 Ills. 



Will 
sprinkle 
an area 
four times 
greater 
than any 
other 
Sprinkler 
made. 



PRICE 
$5.00 
EACH 



Sent C. O. 
D. by • 
express 
prepaid, to 
any 

address, 
with 

privilege 
of five 
days' trial. 



THE globe or body, of the sprinkler is made in two parts, and by means of the swiftly revolving arms, and intermediate 
gears, the upper half is made to revolve slowly, carrying the hose nozzle, from which a full stream of water is thrown 
far out beyond the sprinkle of the arms, thereby covering a much larger space than any other stationary 
sprinkler. With an ordinary pressure of water, 20 pounds or upwards, it will thoroughly sprinkle an area 80 feet 
in diameter. The nozzle and the tips on end of arms are adjustable and can be set so as to sprinkle any desired space, or the 
nozzle can be set perpendicular to send the water upwards in a straight stream like a fountain. 

A perforated disc, or rosette, is packed in each box and can be attached in place of the nozzle tip, discharging instead of 
a solid straight stream a very fine mist at the center of the sprinkle of the revolving arms. 

With the exception of the legs all parts are of solid brass, heavily nickeled, making it the most durable, attractive and 
efficient sprinkler ever placed on the market. 

E. STEBBINS MANUFACTURING COMPANY 



SOLE AGENTS AND MANUFACTURERS, 
Agents Wanted Everywhere. Made for J. B. 



SPRINGFIELD, MASS., U. S. A. 
Fellows & Co., 90 Canal St., Boston, Mass. 



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THE COLUMBIA 
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COLUMBIA, HARTFORD, STORMER 
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embody every improvement possible to tbe chain type. Prices: $50, $35, $30, $25. 

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VOIiUME I. Mine Own People. Introduction by Henry James. — Bimi. — Namgay Doola. — The Recru- 
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VOLUME II. Plain Tales from the Hills. Thirty-nine Stories. 

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THE 

Connecticut Magazine 



AN ILLUSTRATED BI-MONTHLY. 

Devoted to Connecticut in its various phases of History, Literature, 
Picturesque Features, Science, Art, and Industries. 



JULY-AUGUST, J900, 


Vol. VL CONTENTS. No. 


5. 


Rock Rimmon, Seymour. (Frontispiece.) 


The Town of Seymour. Illustrated. J^rank G. Bassett. 


311 


Fame. Poem. Burton Langiry Collins. 


334 


Historical Sketch of the Putnam Phalanx. Illustrated. Emory B. Giddings. 


335 


The Harvest Moon. Poem. Herbert Randall. 


347 


The Glebe House. Concluded. Chauncey C. Hotchkiss. 


348 


Thomas Hooker. Alice Porter. 


355 


Governor Talcott's Mansion and the City of Hartford's 




Claim. Illustrated. John R. Campbell. 


359 


Henry Barnard. Portrait. 


362 


Connecticut at the Paris Exposition. Elizabeth Gertrude Daniel. 


363 


The Departments. 




Current Events. 


365 


Historical Notes and Correspondence. 


369 


Genealogical Department. 


371 


Floriculture. Edited by Rev. Magee Pratt. 


374 


Editorial Notes. 


377 


Book Notes and Reviews. 


381 


The Home. Edited by Louise W. Bunce. 


383 


H. Phelps Arms, Editor. H. C. Buck, Business Manager. 


Edward B. Eaton, Advertising Manager. 





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Entered at the Post Office at Hartford, Conn., as mail matter of the second class. 



ANEW BOOK just issued deals in a fas- 
cinating manner with European Coun- 
tries and Customs* "Observations" 

is its title, and its author, Ratcliffe Hicks* The 
book has received the highest testimonials from 
the reading public* ^^ ^§ 






145 West 58th Street, 

New York, Jan. 27, 1900. 

" Observations" is one of the most de- 
lightfully interesting books a man ever 
placed between thumb and fingers. So 
interested did I become in its contents 
that I sat up until the " small hours" en- 
joying the treat, or, in other words, re- 
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book. 

Edward Quintard, M.D. 



St. Patrick's Church, 
St. Paul, Minn., Feb. 19, 1900. 

I was more than delighted with the 
book " Observations." What struck me, 
apart from its interesting details, was its 
sobriety of judgment and what I may call 
its trueness. I am familiar with all the 
Latin and Teutonic languages, so I can 
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who have traveled extensively in Europe, 
and they likewise were struck with the 
justness of your views. I read the work 
all through at one sitting. 

James C. Byrne, 
Ex-Pres. St. Thomas' College. 



Connecticut Agricultural College, 
Storrs, Conn., Feb. 12, 1900. 
I found it so entertaining that I had to 
finish it at a single sitting. 

Geo. W. Flint, President. 



37 W. 58th St., New York City. 
It is a most interesting and instructive 
work. It is a classic in simplicity. 

F. F. HOYT. M.D. 



Brown University, 
[Providence, March 12, 1900. 
I have read with much interest the book 
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concrete statements, the comparisons of 
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peoples, and the philosophical and fair- 
minded tone. 

John H. Appleton, Professor. 

Paris, March 13, 1900. 
Please accept the thanks of the Cham- 
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reading it. I could not put it down until 
I had finished it. 

Edward M. Green, 
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The Connecticut Magazine. 



Vol. 6. 



July- August, 1900. 



No. S. 




THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



BY FRANK G. BASSETT. 



The Naugatuck Valley, through 
which a river of the same name 
flows, is known for the beauty of its 
scenery; bordered on every side by 
wooded hill-sides, precipitous ridges 
of rocks, and in the valley are located 
the villages. The town of Seymour is 
located in the valley of the Nauga- 
tuck, about five miles north of where 
the river empties its waters into the 
Housatonic river. 

Near the center of the village there 
is a towering rock called Castle 
Rock, three hundred and forty feet 
high, and on the north is another 
rock called Rock Rimmon, which is 
five hundred fifty feet high. From 'the 
311 



top of those silent monitors you may 
behold the valley and the hills for 
miles around, and as the eye views 
the beautiful scenery one is struck 
with bewildering amazement at the 
wonderous magnificence and beauty 
of the work of the Creator. 

The valley is exceedingly healthful. 
The beauties and advantages which 
this valley presented to our ancestors 
prompted them to build their homes 
here. They were men of thrift and en- 
terprise and among the first to en- 
gage in manufacturing in New Eng- 
land. 

The first tract of land purchased 
from the Indians, which is now a part 



312 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



of the town, was bought by Alexan- 
der Bryan, of Milford, in 1670 for 
seventeen pounds, (known as the 
Great Hill purchase,) which purchase 
Mr. Bryan sold to John Brinsmade, 
Sr., Henry Tomlinson and Joseph 
Hawley, of Stratford, for the same 
consideration (seventeen pounds). 
This purchase was also called the 
''Hawley purchase." 

It was a part of this purchase that 
Sergt. Robert Bassett bought of Mr. 
Hawley in 1716 and gave to his son 




OLD BLACKSMITH SHOP. 

Samuel, who became one of Derby's 
foremost citizens. 

Great Hill is rightly named, being 
the highest elevation in the town, and 
from the top a most charming view 
may be had in every direction. On a 
clear day one can see Long Island 
Sound as well as many miles of the 
Island. 

On the 20th day of March, 1756, 
the Great Hill purchase was divided 
among the heirs of the original con- 
tributors to the purchasee, (eighty- 
three in number.) This part of the 
town was for a number of years the 
most important part. 

On the 22d of April, 1678, a tract 
of land was purchased from the In- 
dians, at what is now the village of 
Seymour; the deed reads as follows: 

'This indenture made the 22d day 
of April, 1678, witnesseth that we do 
sell unto the inhabitants, a tract of 



land at Pagasett, bounded on the 
north with Bladen's brook, and north- 
west with Mill river, and south and 
southwest with the Englishmen's 
ground, and west and northwest with 
a hill on the west side of the Nauga- 
tuck river, part of the bounds and 
the Naugatuck river the other part, — 
all of which we do confirm unto the 
said inhabitants ; only, the said Indi- 
ans do reserve the fishing place at 
Naugatuck, and the plain and the hill 
next the river at the fishing place. 
Further, the Indians do grant all the 
grass and feed and timber on the 
plain against Rock Rimmon, and do 
engage to sell it to them, if they sell 
it, — all which grants we do confirm 
for forty pounds, to be paid to them 
at Mr. Bryan's." 

Indian witnesses: 

Husks, his mark. 

Suckcoe, 

Okenung, Sagamore, his mark. 

Ahuntaway, his mark. 

Jack, " - 

Cockapatana, " " 

Sauquett, 

Toms Squaw, " " 

Tom, 

It is evident from this deed that 
the first name of the locality where 
the village of Seymour now stands 
was Naugatuck or Naugetuc, which 
name has been changed from time to 
time to suit the fancy of the in- 
habitants that have resided here in 
the various generations. 

There are a number of places in 
the old records where the fishing 
place at Naugatuck is mentioned. Ac- 
cording to tradition the word Nauga- 
tuck means in the Indian language 
"one big tree." Tradition further 
states that near the falls there was a 
large hemlock tree, and from this 
tree the Indians called the place 
Naugatuck. Mr. Orcutt in his history 
of Derby states that he doubts the 
correctness of the above tradition. 
He claims that the word the Indians 
used was Amaug-Suck ; (which means 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



m 



fishing place at tide water, or a pour- 
ing out of water) and that Amaug- 
Suck was the original Indian nam^ of 
the place. 

However true this claim may be of 
Mr. Orcutt's there is the fact which 
presents itself to our view in all of 
the deeds given by the Indians of land 
near the falls, the word Naugatuck is 



necticut in 1804 gave it the name of 
Humphreysville in honor of Col. 
David Humphrey who located here 
about that time and engaged in man- 
ufacturing. In 1850 the town was in- 
corporated and set off from the town 
of Derby under the name of Sey- 
mour after Thomas H. Seymour, who 
was governor of the State at the time. 




BANK STREET — LOOKING TOWARD THE COVERED BRIDGE 



ased to designate the locality, it is 
therefore evident that the Indiana 
accepted the English understanding 
of the word as the proper word, or 
name of the place. I believe there- 
fore that we can say, without tear 
of contradiction, that the first name 
given to the place where the village 
of Seymour is located was Nauga- 
tuck, and was so called until 1Y38, 
when it was changed to Chusetown, 
after an Indian chief who resided here 
at that time. The Legislature of Con- 



Until 1850 Seymour was a part of 
the town of Derby, but in order to 
give a record of the territory and the 
people who inhabited what is now the 
town of Seymour, it will be necessary 
to give many facts that were con- 
sumated while it was a part of the 
ancient town of Derby. 

In the year 1G7S Col. Ebenezer 
Johnson bought from the Indians 
three small parcels of land ; bounded 
on the northwest with Rock Rim- 
mon, and on the east with Lebanon 



314 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



and on the south with a small brook 
and the Naugatuck river, and on the 
west with a hill on the west side of 
the Naugatuck river, so as to take 
in the httle plain. Col. Johnson was 
granted the right to this land by the 
town, provided he would take an- 
other man with him. The Colonel 
selected Jeremiah Johnson, Sr., 
whose grandson Benajah built a 
house at the foot of the hill just 
beyond the residence of Mr. Howard 
Chatfield on Skokorat street about 
1727. At the same time the town 
granted liberty to Samuel Riggs, 
Daniel ColUns, John Tibbals and 
Phillip Denman to take up land at 
Rock Rimmon. In 1683 Ensign Sam- 
uel Riggs and Col. Ebenezer John- 
son divided the land which they 
owned at Rimmon as follows : To 
Samuel Riggs half the land at Rim- 
mon on the northwest of the said 
Samuel Riggs' cellar, between that 
and the Rock, and Col. Johnson the 
other half on the northwest of said 
cehar. This cellar must have been 
located near where Mr. Andrew 
Wheeler now lives. The records state 
the land which the Col. bought was 
bounded on the northwest by Rock 
Rimmon, which fact would locate 
the land where, what is now called 
Skokorat street. The cellar mention- 
ed in this record is the first mention 
of the preparation for building in 
this vicinity, but there is no record 
which states that the house was built 
or that Ensign Samuel Riggs lived 
in this vicinity. 

The land which Daniel Collins ob- 
tained at Rimmon he sold to Abel 
Holbrook with house, provided the 
said Holbrook "rende" clapboards 
enough to clapboard the sides and 
end of the house. The house was 
27x18% feet. Mr. Abel Holbrook was 
the ancestor of Mr. Smith Holbrook 
of Skokorat, who now lives upon the 
old homestead. (The sale was made 
Feb. 11, 1679.) 

The next land purchased in this 
vicinity was by David Wooster in 



1692 from the Indians and was a 
long strip on the west side of the 
river known as long plain; bounded 
on the north by Little River and run- 
ning south to the present Ansonia 
town line. 

In 1731 they bought of the Indi- 
ans all the land known as Indian Hill, 
in Derby, situated upon east side of 
Naugatuck river near the place 
called the Falls ; all the land that lieth 
eastward, northward and southward, 
except the plain that lieth near the 
Falls up to the foot of the hill" This 
deed was signed by John Cookson 
and John Howd and other Indians. 

Indian Hill included what is now 
known as the Promised Land, and 
east to the Woodbridge line. 

The last of the Indian land was sold 
in 1810 to Col. David Humphreys 
and Phebe Stiles. 

Indians at the Falls. 

Soon after 1700 the Indians who 
had been driven from the seashore 
by the approach of the English began 
to congregate at the Falls, which 
place they had reserved to themselves 
by the deed given tp the inhabitants 
of Derby, dated the 22d day of April, 
1678. They were a part of the tribes, 
the Poototucks and Paugasucks. In 
or about 1738 Joseph Mauwee, bet- 
ter known as Joseph Chuse, became 
their Chief, although some writers 
state that he was at the Falls as early 
as 1720. The first mention made of 
him as being at the Falls in the -rec- 
ords is in 1738, which is undoubted- 
ly the time that he located there. 

There seems to be some doubt as 
to who Joseph Mauwee was, or bow 
he came to be the chief of this little 
tribe of Indians at the Falls; some 
writers stating that he was a Pe- 
quot Indian while others state that 
Gideon Mauweehen was his father, 
and a Pequot Indian. From my re- 
search I am satisfied that Mr. Orcutt 
has solved the problem when he states 
that Joseph Mauwee was a son of 
Gideon Mauwee, or Mauweehen, and 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR, 



3^5 



that Gideon was a son of Chief 
Chusumack, and that it was from his 
grandfather that he obtained the 
name of Chuse, being an abbreviation 
of Chusmack, rather than from the 
traditional statement that Gideon 
nicknamed him Chuse from the pe- 
cular manner in which he pronomiced 
the word choose. 

Mr. Barbor in his history of Con- 
necticut states that Joseph Chuse 
married a woman of the East Haven 
tribe about 1730, and had ten chil- 
dren. The yongest of them was 
Eunice, born about 1755. Gideon 
Mauweehen, who gathered the Indi- 
ans at Scaticook in Kent, gave to 
his son Joseph the Indian grounds 
or field at the Falls. At the time 
Chuse located at the Falls there were 
but two or three families living in 
the place ; they lived on Indian Hill. 
Chuse first erected his wigwam on 
the flats jut north of where the old 
cotton mill now stands (1900.) It is 
stated on very good authorit)^ that 
the families who located on Indian 
hill (near where the Methodist church 
now stands) induced Chuse to remove 
from the Falls to where the residence 
of the late Doctor Thomas Stoddard 
stands ; where he lived until Mr. 
Whitmore built his house there. 
Chuse then moved back to the Falls. 
He built his wigwam in a grove at 
the foot of the hill where he resided 
until he removed to Scaticook about 
1789. Near the river was an old In- 
dian burying ground where each 
grave was marked by a small heao of 
stones. In 1790 MV. Nathan Stiles 
bought this land and in ploughing it 
over destroyed those relics of an- 
tiquity. 

Chuse is said to have been a very 
large athletic man ; very spry and 
an active hunter. From the records 
of the Rev. Daniel Humphries d?ted 
September 12, 1779, it is stated that 
Ann Chuse was admitted to com- 
munion with the church of Christ. 
In 1787 the Rev. Martin Fuller re- 
corded her name as Anna Mawhee, 



at the same time he recorded 
Chuse's name as Joseph Mawhee. 

There are some very good stories 
told about Chuse ; one is to the efiFect 
that Chuse having lived among the 
white settlers had become partly 
civilized. He had been in the habit of 
attending church and by his associa- 




TRINITY CHURCH. 

tions with the white people, and 
his attendance at church he obtained 
some knowledge of the doctrines of 
the gospel. The following facts must 
have taken place in his younger days, 
as we find he was a church member 
in 1787. 

Chuse having a child very danger- 
ously ill, became impressed with the 
desire of having it baptized; he call- 
ed on the Congregational minister 
to perform the ceremony. The minis- 
ter asked him if he was in full com- 
munion with the church, to which 
Chuse replied he was not. Then, said 
the minister, I must refuse to baptize 
the child; to this Chuse asked, "Do 
you call yourself a minister of 
Christ?" "Yes," was the reply. "You 
are not," said Chuse, "but the min- 
ister of the Devil. Christ commanded 
to teach all nations, baptizing them 



3i6 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 




THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



317 




CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH AND PARSONAGE. 



in the name of the Lord." The child 
it is said received the rite of baptism 
from the rector of the Episcopal 
church. 

John Hude or Howd was the suc- 
cessor of Chuse as Sachem of this 
little tribe of Indians that located at 
the Falls. 

Eunice, the daughter of Chuse, 
gave to Mr. Barber many of the 
above facts; she was at that time 
eighty-two years of age, (1836). 

The last of the Indians disappear- 
ed from this vicinity about 1840. 

The First Mill. 

The first record of a mill being 
built or used in this vicinity was by 
a deed of transfer dated August J 747, 
from one George Abbott of Derby 
to a Stephen Perkins of New Haven, 
located on Little River about two 
miles from where Little River empties 



into the Naugatuck. This deed trans- 
ferred to Mr. Perkins a part ot a 
grist mill, a saw mill and a dweiUng 
house. The next enterprise was a 
corn mill built by James PricharJ in 
1760 on Little River near where the 
James Swan Company's upper shop 
is located. It is therefore evident that 
the waters of Little River was the 
first to be used for mill purposes, 
and has continued to be used from 
1745 to 1900, giving employment to 
hundreds of people. 

In 1760 Joseph Chuse and John 
Howd as Sachems for the Indians 
sold to Thomas Perkins of Endfield 
and Ebenezer Keeney, Joseph Hull, 
Jr., and John Wooster of Derby, one 
acre of land on the east side of the 
river at the Falls including the water 
privilege, for the purpose of putting 
up some iron works, but nothing was 
done until after Oct. 4, 1763, when 



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777^ TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



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FALLS HILL. 



Ebenezer Keeney, Joseph Hull, Jr., 
and John Wooster of Derby pur- 
chased from the Indians one and one- 
half acres of land for a roadway 
through the Indian field; this deed 
was signed by Joseph Chuse and 
John Howd as the chief men of the 
tribe. 

On this land was erected first a 
fulling mill, then a saw mill and a 
grist mill. 

In 1785 John Wooster and Brad- 
ford Steele leased for 999 years, for 
fifteen pounds, ''a certain spot or 
privilege at a place called Rimmon 
Falls upon the east side of the Naug- 
atuck River for the purpose of build- 
ing a blacksmith shop, and erecting 
a hammer to go by water. They man- 
ufactured sythes and did other black- 
smith work. They set up a grind stone 
and other machinery necessary for 
conducting the business. This mill 
was located near where the old cot- 



ton mill now stands. The deed states 
that the land had a front of fifty teet 
on the flume and was next to the 
river. It was undoubtedly located 
where the old car axle shop was be- 
tween the Plush Mill and the old Cot- 
ton Mill. 

About 1790 Nathan Stiles, (a son 
of Benjamin), the first lawyer to lo- 
town and bought out John Wooster 
and Ebenezer Keeney, who were part 
owners of the property at the Fjills. 
This property consisted of two full- 
ing mills, a saw mill, grist mill and a 
clothier's shop. The company was 
reorganized; the following were the 
stockholders : Bradford Steele, Sr., 
George Steele, Bradford Steele, Jr., 
and Nathan Stiles. The company sold 
out to Col. David Humphrey in 1S03. 

Mr. Isaac Baldwin came from 
Litchfield, Conn., about 1785 and 
built a grist mill on Little River near 
where the famous Swan Co.'s middle 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



319 



shop in Woodbury now stands. 
He was a man of strong re- 
ligious convictions and an un- 
tiring student of the scriptures. It 
was at his house that the Methodists 
first held their meetings. The society 
was formed at his house Feb. 7, 
179 — . It was at his house while one 
of the meetings were being held that 
the boys cHmbed to the roof and put 
something over the top of the chim- 
ney and smoked the few that were 
congregated at the meeting out of 
the house and broke up the meeting. 
Mr. Baldwin was killed at his mill 



is now known as the S. Y. Beach 
Paper Company. 

In 1803 Col. David Humphreys, 
ex-minister to Portugal and Spain, 
and aid to Washington during the 
Revolutionary War, bought the prop- 
erty at the Falls December 13, 1S03. 
The deed of transfer was signed by 
Bradford Steele, Sr., Bradford Steele, 
Jr., and George Steele. Col. Humph- 
rey associated with him in business 
Captain Thomas Vose of Derby. The 
business was conducted under the 
name of T. Vose & Company. The 
Colonel while on a visit to England 




OLD WOOLEN MILL OF GEN. DAVID HUMPHREYS — BUILT 1806. 



while cutting the ice from the water 
mill. He was buried in the town of 
Litchfield, Conn. 

The next manufacturing enterprise 
was a fulling mill and a saw mill on 
Bladen's brook about one mile east 
of the railroad station, built by Mr. 
Thaddeus Hine of Derby about 1790. 
Mr. Hine sold the property to Titus 
H. Beach, 1799, who afterwards sold 
it to Charles Oatman, who carried 
on the business for a number of years. 
This property subsequently came in- 
to the possession of Sharon Yale 
Beach, where he in 1850 built and 
carried on the making of paper. It 



became interested in the manufac- 
turing industries of that country. He 
also made the acquaintance of Mr. 
John Winterbotham, who was en- 
gaged in the manufacture of woolen 
cloth. Mr. Winterbotham was edu- 
cated in every branch of the business. 
Col. Humphreys after a time suc- 
ceeded in inducing him to sell his 
business and remove to the United 
States. He became associated w?th 
the firm of T. Vose & Co. This firm 
brought over from England Thomas 
Gilyard, Robert Lees, and others, to 
work in their mill. In 180G the com- 
pany built a mill for the purpose of 



320 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



manufacturing woolen cloth ; this mill 
was raised June 6, 1806, and is still 
standing, (1900). 

Col. Humphreys employed a large 
number of boys in the factory whom 
he had brought from different parts 
of the country. For these he estab- 
Hshed evening and Sunday schools, 
with competent teachers to instruct 
them. He also indulged his military 



Forest, President, and J. Fisher 
Leaming, Secretary. The capital 
stock was $50,000. In 1843 the com- 
pany sold the paper mill to George 
L. Hodge, Sharon Y. Beaoh and 
Samuel Rosehe. In 1845 the company 
sold their cotton factory to William 
Buffum for $12,000, which business 
he conducted until 1850. In 1844 a 
company was formed which bought 




WORKS OF THE NEW HAVEN COPPER CO. AT SEYMOUR. 



fancy by organizing them at no light 
expense as a military company, drill- 
ing them himself and furnishing the 
uniforms. Many of the boys became 
very prominent men and their de- 
scendants are among the first and 
foremost of the country. 

In 1810 the mill company was re- 
organized and the name was changed 
from T. Vose & Co., to the Humph- 
reysville Manufacturing Company. 
This company manufactured woolen 
and cotton goods and paper ; the pa- 
per mill of the company was sold 
to Worrull «& Hudson, and in 1816 
Worrull & Hudson sold to Ebenezer 
Fisher and Henry La Forge. In 1825 
the mill was raised a story then the 
company began the manufacture of 
paper by machinery. 

The Humphreysville Manufactur- 
ing Company bought the paper mill 
from Fisher & La Forge, Jan. 27, 
1831. In May, 1822, the company was 
again reorganized with John W. De 



the property of the Humphreysville 
Manufacturing Company under the 
firm name of Dwight French & Co. 
This company in 1849 began to build 
cars and in 1852 formed the American 
Car Company, with a capital stock of 
$150,000, which amount was increased 
before the end of the year to $200,- 
000. The company erected five large 
shops for the purpose of building 
railroad cars. The company conduct- 
ed quite an extensive business for a 
number of years. In 1855 the car 
car works were removed to Chicago 
and Springfield, 111. By the removal 
the town sustained a great loss. The 
President of this company was John 
H. Lyman ; local directors were Tim- 
othy Dwight, John W. Dwight and 
Raymond French. 

The Humphreysville Copper Com- 
pany was organized in 1849, with John 
W. Dwight as President ; Directors, 
Raymond French, Harrison Tomlin- 
son, George Rice and Sheldon Keen- 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



321 



ey; the capital was $40,000. In 1852 
the stock was increased to $200,000, 
and in 1854 the stock was again in- 
creased to $390,000. In 1855 a new 
company was organized under the 
same name; the stock was placed at 
$750,000 with liberty to increase to 
$1,000,000. The persons mentioned in 
the act of incorporation was John W. 
Dwight, William Cornwall, George 
De Forest, Henry Bronson, Charles 
Durand, Sheldon Keeney, Samuel K. 
Satterlee, George R. A. Ricketts and 
Heuchman S. Soule. 

On Nov. 21, 1855, the New Haven 
Copper Co. was organized with a cap- 
ital stock of $400,000, which compa- 
ny absorbed the Humphreysville 
Copper Company. John W. Dwight 
was the first president and George 
R. A. Ricketts, Secretary. In 1860 
this industry became the property of 
Mr. W. W. Goddard of Boston, Mass. 
Being a thorough business man he 
knew that in order to make the busi- 
ness a success he must have a man 
to conduct the manufacture of the 
goods at the mill who was master of 
the art in all its branches, and for this 
responsible position he employed 
Mr. Thomas James, who had learned 
the business in Wales before coming 
to this country. In 1864 Mr. Goddard 
who had other large business inier- 
ests which required his attention, sold 
the business here to Hendricks and 
Lissberger, which business was con- 
ducted by them until March 13, 1872, 
when the present company was or- 
ganized with the following stock- 
holders : Samuel Holmes, Thomas 
James, Franklin Farrell, and Lazarus 
Lissberger. 

Wt. Lissberger was elected Presi- 
dent, Samuel Holmes Secretary and 
Treasurer, and Thomas James Super- 
intendent and business manager. 
From the commencement of Mr. 
James' management of the business 
of this concern to his death it was a 
grand success in every way, giving 
employment to hundreds of men who 
held him in high esteem and respect. 



The present officers of the com- 
pany are Thomas L. James, Presi- 
dent; Lewis S. Camp, Secretary; 
Fred. A. Rugg, Treasurer, and (jeo. 
A. James, Superintendent. The above 
officers were educated in the cop- 
per business by Mr. Thomas James. 
This is one of the foremost in- 
dustries of the town. The 
sheet and planished copper which is 
turned out of this mill is of the finest 
order and is not surpassed by any 
mill in the country. 

Sketch of Mr. James. 

Mr. Thomas James whose portrait 
appears in this issue was born in 
Swansee, Wales, Aug. 2, 1817. He 
came to this country in 1838 and 




THOMAS JAMES. 

when he landed in New York he 
found that all the money he possess- 
ed w^as one dollar. He entered the 
employ of Phelps, Dodge & Co., and 
commenced work in their copper mill 
at Derby, Ct., where he remained un- 
til 1847 when he removed to Ansonia, 



322 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



Conn., where the company had buih a 
new mill. 

In 1849 the Humphreysville Cop- 
per Co., learning of the skill which 
Mr. James had displayed in the art 




ST. Augustine's (r. c.) church. 

of copper working, offered him a 
position in their employ. He accept- 
ed their offer and removed to 
Humphreysville (now Seymour,) and 
through his industry, business abil- 
ity and integrity, he was advanced 
from a workman on the floor of the 
mill to the presidency of the compa- 
ny. 

Mr. James was always foremost in 
advocating better schools and provid- 
ing better opportunities for the chil- 
dren of the town to obtain a more ad- 
vanced education. 

He was foremost in every enter- 
prise that tended to improve and 
beautify our town. 

He was one of the organizers of 
Christ Episcopal church of Ansonia 
and after removing to Seymour he 
united with Trinity Episcopal church 
here, in which he was very much in- 
terested, giving liberally to its sup- 
port and always ready to advocate 
and uphold those sublime teachings 



given to the church by Him who died 
that we might live. 

He was one of the vestrymen for 
a number of years. 

Mr. James married for his second 
wife of H. Minerva, dau. of Frederic 
and Hepsiboh (Johnson) Rowe, June 
19, 1843, at Derby, Ct., who was of 
great assistance to him in health and 
in sickness. 

Mr. James died July 4, 1887 at 
Seymour Conn. 

The Augur Business. 

The first Augur made and sold in 
the New York market was made in 
this town by Mr. Walter French, who 
came here from Mansfield, Conn., 
about 1810 and commenced the man- 
ufacture of screw augurs by hand. He 
built his shop on land now owned by 
the James Swan Company and was lo- 
cated near where their 'upper shop 
now stands, making nearly one hun- 
dred years that augurs have been 
made at this place. 

In digging some time ago near 
where the old shop stood, Mr. Wil- 
liam Swan unearthed an old broad 



THE OLD BROADAXE. 



axe which was made by Mr. Frerich 
many years ago, it is of an excellent 
design, far better than most o| the 
tools were at that day and time, which 
fact proves that Mr. French was a 
workman of no mean order. 

Mr. Walter French was born Jan. 
5, 1781, he married Laura, dau. of 
Cordial and Lettice (Crummings) 
Storrs of Mansfield, Conn., 1803. Mr. 
French died May 26, 1865. Laura 
Storrs was born Jan. 13, 1784 at 
Mansfield, Conn. 



THE TOWN Oh SEYMOUR. 



323 




WALTER FRENCH. 



On July 25, 1832, Raymond French 
& Co. commenced the manufacturing 
of augurs and other edge tools at 
Blueville. The dam and shop were 
built by Newel Johnson in 1830 and 
sold to Dwight & French who en- 
larged the plant for their business. 
This shop was destroyed by fire on 
the 15th of July, 1841, but was soon 
rebuilt. On Oct. 31, 1845 this mill 
was leased to De Forest and Hodge, 
who changed it into a paper mill. 
They conducted business there for a 
few years. In 1854 Smith ^ Bassett, 
the owners of the property, sold it to 
Mr. Austin Day, since which time 
the hard rubber and insulated electric 
wire business has been conducted 
there exclusively. Mr. Austin j^ay 
was the inventor of the process for 
making hard rubber. A few years 
later he sold out the hard rubber part 
of the business to his brothers, Hen- 
ry P. and Edmond Day, which busi- 



ness is now (1900) conducted by 
them. 

After Mr. Austin Day's death the 
insulated wire business became the 
property of Mr. William R. Brixey, 
by whom it is now conducted; it is 
Known as the Kerite works. The 
goods manufactured by this firm are 
considered the most substantial and 
durable of any manufactured in the 
world. 

Gilbert & Wooster carried on the 
manufacture of augurs and bits in 
Bennett Wooster's blacksmith shop, 
which was located near where the rear 
of the copper mill now stands ; this 
was their forge room shop wiiere 
their forges were filling room in the 
south part of Gilbert's building, cor- 
ner of Main and Maple streets, and 
their polishing room was in the saw 
mill at the Falls. 

Hiram Upson came from Water- 
bury to Humphreysville and began 
the manufacture of ausrurs in a build- 




RAV.\K>M) I KE.NCH. 



ing that stood near where the James 
Swan Company's upper shop now 
stands. Mr. Upson afterwards asso- 
ciated himself with Horace A. Rad- 
ford and Lucius Tuttle, which firm 



:324 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



bought the factory built by Timothy 
Dwight at the mouth of Little River 
in 1852, where they commenced the 
manufacture of augurs and bits in 
1859. This business was sold to 
Charles Douglass, and after a num- 
ber of changes it became the property 
of James Swan in 1877. This business 
has been enlarged under the manage- 
ment of Mr. Swan until now it is one 
of the largest enterprises in the town, 
giving employment to a large num- 
ber of hands. Mr. Swan a few years 
ago enlarged the factory at the upper 
end of Bank street and moved a part 
of his works that was in the build- 
ing at mouth of Little River. This 
building is now occupied by the H. A. 
Matthews Manufacturing Company. 

James Swan. 

Mr. James Swan, the subject of this 
sketch, was born at Dumfries, Scot- 
land, December 18, 1833. He is a son 



of William and Mary (Beck) Swan; 
(his mother was a sister of the father 
of the late U. S. Senator of Kentucky, 
James Beck). Mr. Swan came to this 





James swan. 



JAMES SWAN CO.'S WORKS, 

country after learning the trade of 
millwright, in 1853, and soon after his 
arrival he entered the employ of the 
Bassett Iron Foundry at Derby, Ct. 
A few years later he secured a posi- 
tion with the Farrell Foundry and 
Machine Company of Ansonia, Ct., 
where he remained until 1865, at 
which time the Oliver Ames Co., 
(better known as the Douglass Man- 
ufacturing Company), engaged his 
services as superintendent of their 
Augur and Bit Works at Seymour, 
Ct. In 1876 Mr. Swan bought the 
Douglass Company's business and 
real estate, which was located in Sey- 
mour and commenced the manufac- 
ture of all kinds of edge tools, which 
business he has improved and en- 
larged until it is now one of the larg- 
est concerns in this country, engaged 
in the manufacture of augurs and oth- 
er edge tools. Mr. Swan is possessed 
of a very inventive mind which has 
enabled him to improve the quality 
and durability of the goods to that 
extent, that the company has been 
able to obtain rewards of merit at the 
following expositions : Institute Fair, 
New York, 1865; Paris Exposition, 
1867; Centennial, Philadelphia, Pa., 
1876; Paris, 1878, and Sidney Expo- 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



325 



sition, Australia, 1879, and many eth- 
ers. 

Mr. Swan is one of the leading men 
of the town in advocating and en- 
couraging public improvements, es- 
pecially our schools, in which he takes 
a great interest. He dehghts to note 
the improvement of the pupils in their 
studies and is very liberal in giving 



He is a member of the Congrega- 
tional church and was superintendent 
of the Sunday school for a number of 
years. 

Mr. Swan was foremost in organiz- 
ing the fire company and was elected 
the Chief Engineer, which ofifiice he 
has held to the present time. 

He was one of the promoters as 




SEYMOUR HIGH SCHOOL. 



rewards of merit to those that have 
made the greatest improvement. 

Mr. Swan was one of the men who 
first advocated the erection of our 
beautiful school building and was 
chairman of the committee that had 
charge of its erection. He is a mem- 
ber of the Board of Education and 
has been for a number of years. 
23 



well as one of the supporters of our 
public library. 

He represented the town in the 
Legislature. 

The firm of French, Swift & Com- 
pany was organized April 5, 1847, by 
the following gentlemen : Warren 
French, Charles Swift, John F. "Mar- 
shall, Lemuel Bliss, Henry B. Beech- 



326 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



er and Horace Radford for the pur- 
pose of manufacturing augurs and 
bits. This factory is situated on Little 
River about one-third of a mile from 
its mouth, and is now owned by Mr. 
Frank H. Beecher. 

In 1852 the Humphreysville Man- 
ufacturing Co. built the brick factory 
below the Falls and began the manu- 
facture of augurs and bits, pane- 
irons, chisels, and other edge tools, 
which business was conducted by Mr. 
Raymond French for a number of 
years. This company was reorganized 
with the following gentlemen as pro- 
prietors : Norman Sperry, George H. 
Robinson, David R. Cook and Marcus 
Sperry. This business is now con" 
ducted by Mr. Norman Sperry who 
is making the finest goods upon the 
market. 

Garrett & Beach, manufacturers 
of German gimlet bits, cast-steel 





ENGINE HOUSE. 
CITIZEN ENGINE, HOOK AND LADDER CO., NO. 2. 



REV. DR. MANSFIELD. 
First Rector of the Episcopal Parish of Seymour. 

reamers and screw-driver bits, are lo- 
cated in the Humphreysville Manu- 
factory Company's shop. 

The New Haven Copper Company 
also had a large augur and bit manu- 
factory in connection with their cop- 
per works. This firm does a very ex- 
tensive business in this line as well 
as in the copper business. 

The Manufacture of Paper. 

The first paper mill to be buih in 
the town was built by the Humph- 
reysville Manufacturing Co., which 
business the company sold to Wor- 
rell & Hudson, who in turn sold in 
1816 to Fisher & La Forge and in a 
few years it was bought back bv the 
Humphreysville Manufacturing Com- 
pany, and in 1843 they again sold it, 
the purchasers being George L. 
Hodge, Sharon Y. Beach, and Sam- 
uel Roselle. This company was in 
1845 reorganized with Ezekiel Gil- 
bert, Sharon Y. Beach and Saniuel 
Roselle at the same time taking a 
lease of the mill for five years ; at the 
end of the five years Mr. Beach 
bought Messrs. Gilbert and Roselle 
out and moved the mill to its pres- 
ent location on Bladen's brook about 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



327 



one mile east of the present railroad 
station. This company was reorgan- 
ized and is composed of Sharon Y. 
Beach and his four sons, George W., 
Andrew Y., Sharon D., and Theodore 

B. Beach, and is known as the S. Y. 
Beach Paper Co., which compary is 
conducting the business at the mill 
on Bladen's brook in the manufacture 
of specialties in colored papers. 

Chester Jones and Daniel White 
commenced manufacturing June 8, 
1831. The first mill for the manufac- 
ture of paper at the mouth of Blad- 
en's brook, and known as the Smith 
mill, was built by John S. Moshier 
in 1831, which mill was sold to John 

C. Wheeler in 1833, and leased by him 
to Daniel White, who was then 
running the paper mill at the 
Falls. Mr. White was not suc- 
cessful and in 1834 gave up business. 
When Mr. John C. Wheeler gave Mr. 
Sylvester Smith one-quarter interest 
in the business, this partnership last- 
ed three years. In 1837 Mr. Wheeler 




S. Y. BEACH. 

Mr. Bassett sold half of the mill to 
Mr. Smith. The mill has been burned 
three times and at each time the own- 
ers sustained a great loss. 

Lewis Bunce had a paper mill at 



r 







f*^p 



S. Y. BEACH PAPER CO. 



rented the mill to Sylvester Smith 
and Samuel Bassett. Feb. 10, 1840, 
Smith & Bassett bought the mill of 
Mr. Wheeler, and in January, lt'56. 



the mouth of Little River, which mill 
was burned and on January 27, 1849, 
a new company was formed by the 
following gentlemen: Andrew W. 



328 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR, 



De Forest, Burritt Hitchcock, Eli 
Hayes, Horace Riley, James H. Eid" 
well, James Wallace. Burritt Hitch- 
cock was elected president and A. W. 
De Forest secretary. This mill was 
located at the mouth of Little River. 
Mr. Bunce continued in charge of the 
mill. This company was known as the 
Rimmon Paper Company. 

The Globe Works was located 
on a little brook about half a 
mile south of the village. The dam 



The upper shop was idle for a num- 
ber of years. It was leased to Louns- 
bury & Gabriel who carried on the 
manufacture of goods from vegeta- 
ble ivory, which business they con- 
ducted until the mill was burned. 
Both of the mills are now in ruins. 

The Eagle Manufacturing Com- 
pany was organized June 27, 1S50, 
with a capital stock of $50,000, for 
the purpose of manufacturing silk, 
woolen and cotton goods. George 




LOOKING SOUTHWEST FROM THE PARK. 



for this factory was built by Glover 
Bassett. It was first used by Mr. Rad- 
ford for a blacksmith shop. Mr. Rad- 
ford sold the privilege and shop to 
Mr. Albert Steele, who conducted the 
manufacture of furniture. Later Mr. 
Steele sold the property to Mr. Hen- 
ry Wheeler and Andrew Hartson. 
They manufactured augurs and bits ; 
this company failed. The lower :-hop 
was then made into a grist mill. 



Rice was elected the first president. 
In 1852 the stock was increased to 
$100,000 and George De Forest was 
elected president. In 1855 Mr. 
George P. Shelton was elected pres- 
ident, and Harrison TomHnson sec- 
retary. This company built the large 
brick factory at the Falls. They also 
built the brick store opposite the rail- 
road station. The company discon- 
tinued their business and leased the 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



329 




RAILROAD STATION, N. Y. , N. H. & H. R. R. 



mill to James Leigh who manutac- 
tured silk by a patent process. This 
business lasted but a short time. The 
mill was then closed for a number of 
years. 

Zaeker Brothers carried on busi- 
ness in the mill for a time, also Shef- 
ford Brothers of Philadelphia con- 
ducted a business for a short time. In 
1880 Mr. John H. Tingue bought the 
mill property and organized a com- 
pany with a capital of $200,000. This 
company manufactures silk mohair 
and cotton plush and yarns. The raw 
materials for the mohair plush is im- 
ported direct from Constantinople. It 
is the fleece of the Angora goat. The 
first mohair plush made in this coun- 
try was made by this company. 

The company employs a large num- 
ber of hands and is continually in- 
troducing new articles in the plush 
line, and is ever ready to supply the 
demands of the market. Mr. Charles 
Coupland, the 
concern, is one of the 
producers of this line 
the country. 

John H. Tingue, the man who i^rst 



manager of this large 



most 
of 



skilled 



goods 



m 



established this business, was a thor- 
ough business man. He conceived 
an unique method of advertising the 
goods manufactured at his mill by of- 
fering to pay $25 to any young lady 
who would collect a string of buttons, 
no two alike, and deliver them at his 
office. The result of his plan was that 
his business was advertised in every 
household in the United States. But- 
tons were sent to him from nearly 
every state in the Union, and for each 
string he paid twenty-five dollars. 
After Mr. Tingue had completed his 
collection he had .some very nice 
cases made for them. He then |)re- 
sented them to the State of Connecti- 
cut, and they are now in the State 
Capitol at Hartford. This firm is one 
of the leading concerns in the town, 
established on a firm foundation. 

The mill at the mouth of Little Riv- 
er was built bv Timothv Dwight in 
1837. 

Mr. Charles French, a son of Ray- 
mond, invented a car spring, which 
he manufactured for a number of 
years. This spring is universally used 
todav on all cars. 



330 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 




BY RIMMON POMD. 



The United States Pin Company 
was organized in 1860 and was con- 
ducted for a number of years by 
Thaddeus Fowler. They manufac- 
tured chiefly iron pins. After Mr. 
Fowler's death a new company was 
organized by the following gentle- 
men : Henry L. Hotchkiss, President ; 
Lewis H. Bristol, Secretary, and 
Charles French, Treasurer. 

The Fowler Nail Company was or- 
ganized in 1866, when the following 
officers were elected : President, Car- 
los French; Secretary, Lewis H Biis- 
tol. The company was organized for 
the purpose of manufacturing Vul- 
can horseshoe nails. These nails are 
made by a machine invented by Mr. 
Thaddeus Fowler. Capital $60,000. 

The Seymour Manufacturing Com- 
pany was organized in 1878 and in- 
corporated in 1880, with a capital 
stock of $30,000.00, for the manufac- 
turing of sheet brass, brass wire, 
brass rods and tubing; copper wire 
for telephone purposes, electric rods. 



German silver, etc. The following 
were the officers of the company: 
Nathan S. Johnson, President ; W. H. 
H. Wooster, Secretary and Treasur- 
er, and L. T. Wooster, Superintend- 
ent. Mr. L. T. Wooster, the Superin- 
tendent, is one of the most ac- 
complished students of the brass in- 
dustry in the country. The goods 
manufactured under his direction can- 
not be surpassed, and from the fact 
of the excellent quality of the goods 
made by the firm, it has grown from 
a very small business until now it is 
one of the largest in the country. 

In 1882 Carlos French and' Ed- 
mund Day became interested in the 
Company and the capital was in- 
creased to $75,000.00, and has since 
been increased from time to time un- 
til it is now $500,000.00. 

The H. A. Mathews Manufacturing 
Company was organized in 1890 for 
the purpose of manufacturing stove 
trimmings and other goods in that 
line. In 1895 the company added to 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



331 



the business the manufacturing of 
bicycle parts. Capital stock $85,000. 

The following are the officials of 
the company: James Swan, president; 
Carlos French, vice-president, and F. 
H. Beecher, treasurer and general 
manager. 

In 1897 Mr. Thomas Perrins came 
to this town from Ansonia and com- 
menced the manufacture of eyelets. 
Mr. Perrins was employed for a num- 
ber of years by Mr. George O. 
Schneller, the inventor of the ma- 
chine for the manufacture of the eye- 
lets. 

In 1899 Mr. E. A. Klatt came here 
from Bridgeport, Conn., and organ- 
ized a company. This company built 
a foundry for the purpose of making 
iron casting. The company has al- 
ready a good business estabhshr-d. 

The Rimmon Manufacturing Com- 
pany was organized Jan. 10, 1900, 
with a capital stock of $30,000. Ihis 



company has bought the old paper 
mill property, corner of North Main 
and Day streets. This mill was first 
built by John S. Moshier in 1831. 

Merchants. 

The first to keep a store within the 
limits of this town was Samuel Bas- 
sett. It was located upon the top of 
Great Hill. The next was the stone 
store situated by the side of the 
Housatonic River, the next at Squau" 
tuck, was kept by Ezeakel Gilbert, 
who afterwards removed to the vil- 
lage of Humphreysville, where he en- 
gaged in the mercantile and manufac- 
turing business. 

In 1844 Raymond French & Co. 
built a dam across the Naugatuck 
River about two miles below the vil- 
lage, which privilege the company 
sold to Mr. Anson G. Phelps, Dec. 
5, 1844. 

To Mr. French must be given some 




BY THE FALLS. 



332 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 




ON THE NAUGATUCK. 



of the credit for the location of the the erection of a dam across the riv- 

enterprising city of Ansonia. er just north of the village. After 

In 1847 French & Dwight began building the abutments and a wall 




METHODIST EPISCOPAL CHURCH. 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



?>Z2> 



across the plain, the work was aban- 
doned until 1866 when it was finished. 
It floods a number of acres of land 
and is called Rimmon Pond. 

Roads. 

In 1797-8 the road from Chusetown 
to New Haven was built. 

The first bridge built across the 
river at this place was built in 1*783, 
just south of the Falls. Ashbell Love- 
land was the builder. The second 
bridge to be built across the river 
was built in 1856 at Bank street. The 
bridge below the Falls has been re- 
placed by an iron one. 

The first dam that was built was ai 
what is called the 'Tails." At this 
place on the river is a ledge of rocks 
which forms about two-thirds of the 
dam. This dam was rebuilt in 1850 
in solid masonry by Raymond French. 

General Clark Wooster, who was 
conducting the business in 1849, con- 
ducted an axe factory in what is 




THE SEYMOUR ELECTRIC LIGHT C'O. 

now known as the James Swan Com- 
pany's middle shop on Little River 
for a number of years. After Mr. 
Wooster discontinued the axe busi- 
ness it was used for a grist mill, and 
wood turning shop until it was bought 
by the Douglass Manufacturing Com- 
pany for an augur shop. 

The Seymour Electric Light Co. 
was organized in 1889 with a capital 
of $28,000. 






#*-#^ 




^ 








KINNEYTOWN KALl.S OR DAM. 



334 



THE TOWN OF SEYMOUR. 



Sherman & Beardsley manufactur- 
ed stocking yarn, batting twine and 
carpet warp. 

The Seymour Water Company was 
organized in 1898 ; capital $60,000. 

The Arethusa Spring is located in 
this town ; the water from this spring 
is considered the purest in the coun- 
try. 

Among the noted persons who have 
lived within the Hmits of the town are 
General David Humphreys, Mrs. 
Ann S. Stevens, the writer, Hon. Car- 
los French, Captain Juhus Bassett, 
Captain Hiram Upson, Rev. Amos 
Bassett, D. D., and many others who 
are entitled to mention, but limited 
space forbids. 

Seymour has many attractions for 
those who are lovers of the beauty of 
nature. The town is provided with 
excellent schools of which its citi- 
zens are justly proud, the schools are 
under the supervision of a school 
board, which exercises great care in 



the selection of the teachers for the 
various departments, employing none 
but such as are qualified to fill their 
station with the highest credit and 
ability. 

The town also has a very fine fire 
department composed of its best citi- 
zens. The department is equipped 
with a first class engine, hook and 
ladder and other appliances that go 
to make up a properly organized fire 
department. The water supply is am- 
ple for fire and domestic use. The 
streets are lighted by electricity and 
many other improvements have been 
made which give comfort and pleas- 
ure to its inhabitants. The beauty and 
grandeur of our drives among the 
hills are not surpassed by any town in 
New England. The locality is exceed- 
ingly healthful. 

For the want of time and space I 
have only given a brief account of the 
growth and development of the town 
from 1670 to the present time. 



In a later article on Seymour an extended account will be given of these old family names.— [Ed. 



FAME. 



One, long accounted wise, met me upon a shore 

Where moaning waves will toss forevermore; 

I asked him, What do men most prize and seek to gain? 

Across his features flashed a look of pain. 

He knelt and for reply wrote on a passing wave. 

Burton Langtry Collins. 



HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE PUTNAM PHALANX. 



BY EMORY B. GIDDINGS. 




M 



UGH has 
been said 
and con- 
siderable written, 
concerning the do- 
ings of the Put- 
nam Phalanx, but 
all of these records 
concern recent 
events and none 
record the early 
history of this 
famous organization. In fact so lit- 
tle is really kn^wn concerning the 
history of the company, that it has 
been exceedingly difHcult to obtain 
facts regarding it. To-day the Put- 
nam Phalanx stands at the head of all 
military bodies in the State of Con- 
necticut, while in its ranks are num- 
bered the best known men in the 
commonwealth. Governors, Generals, 
State and Town officials of note, have 
carried and do carry muskets and 
march with the rank and file, when oc- 
casion demands. Although its head- 
quarters are in the Capitol City, its 
members are scattered all over the 
State. The first meeting of which any 
record can be obtained, was held in 
this city, August 9, 1858. It was not 
intended at that time to make the 
organization a permanent one, the 
335 



idea then being to form a military 
company for the time being, which 
according to the historian, ''should 
welcome home. Col. Thomas H. Sey- 
mour, a distinguished fellow towns- 
man, known as the "Hero of Chapul- 
tepec," a title acquired in the Mexi- 
can War. (Col. Seymour had also rep- 
resented this country as Minister at 
the Russian Court, with marked abil- 
ity). A copy of the call for enrollment 
issued by those interested in the 
formation of the company at the time 
reads as follows : 

"We, the undersigned, do hereby 
enroll ourselves, for the purpose of 
forming a military company, to take 
part in connection with the regular- 
ly organized military of this vicinity, 
on the occasion of the return of Col. 
Thomas H. Seymour, to his native 
city, and in giving him such a recep- 
tion as his eminent civil and military 
services entitle him to from the hands 
of his fellow citizens." 

Following this preamble were af- 
fixed the names of the signers, of 
which there were 153 representative 
citizens of Hartford and vicinity. As 
soon as the desired number of mem- 
bers had been secured, a meeting was 
held at the Seymour Light Artillery 
Armory and committees were ap- 



33^ HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE PUTNAM PHALANX. 




HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE PUTNAM PHALANX. 337 



pointed to investigate the questions 
of uniforms, arms, constitution and 
by-laws, finance and a drill ofificer. 
On the 25th of August, another 
meeting was held at which these 
committees reported. By-laws v/ere 
adopted and the committee on arms 
reported that muskets had been ob- 
tained through the courtesy of Col. 
Samuel Colt. Upon the election of 
officers which followed, Horace 
Goodwin was chosen Major; A. M. 
Gordon Captain oi 
the First company 
and Allyn Stillman.. 
captain of the Sec- 
ond company. Up- 
on the suggstion of 
Major N. Seymour 
Webb, who was 
subsequently chos- 
en Adjutant, the 
organization was 
christened the 
"Putnam Phalanx." 
The command 
made its first bow 
to the public as a 
military body o n 
the 22nd of Decem- 
ber 1858, when a 
street parade was 
given. At this time 
no uniform had as 
yet been selected and the members 
of the battalion appeared in the r^'gi- 
mentals of the Amoskeag Veterans 
which were generously loaned them 
by the Manchester organization. 
These uniforms were of the Conti- 
nental style and very similar to those 
worn by the company to-day. At 
the close of the parade the Battalion 
was presented with an appropiiate 
standard by the descendants of Israel 
Putnam, whose name the command 




MAJOR ALLYN S. STILLMAN 
Elected April 19, 1862. 



bore. June 2nd, 1859, the "Puts" 
made their second appearance, this 
time in their own uniforms. At this 
time the Legislature was in session 
and so pleasing was the appearance 
of the new company, that the repre- 
sentatives and senators passed the 
following resolution : — 

"Be it unanimously resolved, Ihat 
the appearance of the Putnam Pha- 
lanx is most gratifying to us and re- 
flects the highest credit not only 
upon its officers, 
but also upon the 
rank and file." 

August 30, 1859, 
was the eventful 
and historical day, 
set aside for the 
reception of Col. 
and Ex-Governor 
Thomas H. Sey- 
mour. Organized 
for the especial 
purpose of taking 
part in this cele- 
bration the mem- 
bers of the Pha- 
lanx turned out in 
force, but three of 
the whole number 
being absent ^vhen 
the roll was called. 
Their showy Conti- 
nental uniforms appeared in striking 
contrast to the more sober ones of 
the Seymour Light Artillery, Light 
Guard, Colt Guard, Hartland Cavalry, 
Citizens' Guard of Rockville and 
other military and civic bodies that 
participated in the parade. Accord- 
ing to the historian, "The display was 
the most grand and imposing one 
ever before witnessed in the Charter 
Oak City and a striking proof of the 
high estimate in which Col. Seymour 



338 HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE PUTNAM PHALANX, 




MAJOR HENRY KENNEDY. 
Elected April ig, 1861. Elected April 20, 1874. 

was held by his friends and acquaint- 
ances at home." 

As has been stated the original 
idea of the Phalanx was to have a 
temporary organization, but its name, 
uniform and spirit so aroused asso- 
ciations of times historic, that it 
culminated in the organization of a 
command, the purpose of which was 
to commemorate and perpetuate the 
glorious past of Israel Putnam and 
other sons of the American Revolu- 
tion. 

Although nominally a military 
body, the Putnam Phalanx is more 
distinctly a social organization. Its 
pilgrimages have been many and in 
every city in which it has appeared it 
has won social distinction. The first 
of these pilgrimages was made in 
October 1859, when the command 
visited Bunker Hill, Boston and 
Providence, beside many other places 
of historical interest. At all of these 
places the Phalanx was greeted with 
the greatest enthusiasm and the 
memories which their appearance re- 



vived were eulogized by the greatest 
orators in the land, among whom was 
Edward Everett of Boston. A second 
trip was made in November, 1860, 
the objective point being the tomb of 
Washington at Mount Vernon. On 
this excursion the command also visit- 
ed the cities of Philadelphia, Balti- 
more and Washington. The ovations 
received upon this occasion are re- 
corded as being among the greatest 
in Phalanx history and are recalled 
with no little pride. 

Since organization the Putnam 
Phalanx has had sixteen Majors and 
of this number, ten have joined the 
silent army of the dead. Among 
those who have had the honor to 
command are men prominent in both 
business and political interests of 
city and state. The roll shows the 
names of Horace Goodwin*, James 

B. Shultas*, Timothy M. Allen-^, C. 

C. Burt*, Seth E. March*, Henry 
Kennedy*, H. L. Welch, Henry 
Kennedy*, Freeman M. Brown, Al- 
vin Squires*, Clayton H. Case, Joseph 




MAJOR FREEMAN M. BROWN. 
Elected Dec. i, 1875. 



HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE PUTNAM PHALANX. 339 




MAJOR CLAYTON H. CASE. 
Elected Feb, 4, 1885. 

Warner*, O. H. Blanchard, Dr. Hen- 
ry Bickford, James N. Shedd and 
Charles B. Andrus. Major Andrus is 
the present incumbent of the office. 

When in 1879 the Phalanx cele- 
brated its 21st birthday and became 
of age, Major Freeman M. Brown, 
then in command, called the attention 
of the members to several matters 
connected with the history of the or- 
ganization, and made several wise 
suggestions which he regarded as 
fundamental to the furtherance of the 
objects of its founders. He suggest- 
ed that as the records were then very 
incomplete, it would be well to gath- 
er such facts connected with its his- 
tory as might be obtained without go- 
ing into lengthy detail, which would 
prove interesting in days to come. 
Major Brown's recommendation was 
well received and at the present t?me 
a brief but comprehensive history, 
framed, adorns the parlor at the arm- 
ory. The facts contained in this were 
obtained to a great extent by ex- 
Capt. Lucius W. Bartlett His work 

* Deceased. 



to this end was ceaseless and untir- 
ing and to him is due no little credit. 

The Phalanx was a healthy young- 
ster and from the date of its birth 
grew rapidly. From 1860 until 1878 
inclusive, accessions to the roll each 
3^ear are recorded as follows : 37, 5"^, 
7*, 12*, 1*, 31, 12, 11, 10, 26, 24, 19, 
12, 8, 27, 14, 22, 39, 31. These addi- 
tions brought the total number of 
members up to 525 actives. It will 
be noticed that the years showing 
the smallest enrollment, were during 
the Civil War, '61-'64. During those 
years interest flagged and there were 
but 100 members on the active roll. 
In January 1871 the membership list 
reached its lowest ebb, when but 50 
actives answered the roll call. Since 
that time, however, the reaction has 
been correspondingly great and to- 
day the organization can show a roll 
which in point of numbers is second 
to none in New England. 

When President Abraham Lincoln 
issued a call for 75,000 troops to put 
down the Rebellion, a meeting of the 

* Civil War. 




MAJOR ALVIN SQUIRES. 
Elected Feb. 8, 1S85. 



340 HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE PUTNAM PHALANX. 





MAJOR O. H, BLANCHARD. 
Elected Feb. i, 1889. 

Phalanx was called for the 26th of 
April, but adjourned until the next 
.day. At the adjourned meeting it 
was voted to put the Battalion un a 
war basis, by supplying the members 
with the most approved fire-arms, 
fatigue uniforms and such other arti- 
cles as are required to make a Battal- 
ion efficient for active service. On 
the 20th of May, 1861, it was voted 
to tender escort to all organizations 
of volunteers leaving the city within 
60 days. According to the historian, 
"This ended as far as appears from 
the records, the active service of the 
Phalanx as a military corps." It 
should be stated, however, in justice 
to the patriotism of the members, that 
many of them were enrolled in the 
ranks of the great army which went 
forth to battle for the nation's honor. 
Many fought their way to fame and 
everlasting glory while others sacri- 
ficed their lives that the Union might 
be preserved. 

In June 1860, the Phalanx made a 
two days' pilgrimage to Brooklyn, 



Conn., paying an official tribute to 
the tomb of General Israel Putnam. 
They were accorded a hearty wel- 
come by the townspeople and the cel- 
ebration was one long to be remem- 
bered. Upon their return a meeting 
of the command was held and resolu- 
tions acknowledging the courtesies 
extended them were adopted. A 
committee of nine was also appoint- 
ed to solicit subscriptions in co-op- 
eration with other organizations in- 
terested, and adopt any means deem- 
ed necessary to further the erection 
of a monument to the memory of 
General Putnam at Brooklyn. Ihis 
committee consisted of S. A. White, 
Thomas H. Seymour, Henry C. Dem- 
ing, J. W. Stewart, Timothy M. Allvn, 
E. N. Kellogg, C. C. Waite, Oliver 
Ellsworth and James Spencer. What 
conclusion this committee reached or 
what was the result of their w^ork 
is only a matter of conjecture, but it 
is presumed that their duties were in- 
terfered with by the opening of the 
Civil War. However this may be, 
it was not until a quarter of a century 
later, through the efforts of the Pha- 
lanx and the citizens of Brooklyn, that 
the matter was brought to the atten- 
tion of the Legislature and the ap- 
propriation of a sufficient sum to erect 
a suitable and appropriate monument 
to the memory of Connecticut's 
heroic son, was obtained. The monu- 
ment was dedicated \yith imposing 
ceremonies in which the Phalanx 
participated, June 14th, 1888. It is 
told with exceeding gusto by mem- 
bers of the Phalanx who took part 
in these ceremonies, that this occasion 
was the only one on which the 
'Tuts" did guard duty and called for 
water. It seems that the company 
of militia which was to have done 
guard duty at the time failed to ma- 
terialize and in consequence the P'ha- 
lanx were detailed to keep the crowd 
back. The day was exceedingly hot 
and sultry and with their heavy 
muskets and Continental uniforms, 
the 'Tuts" suffered all the torments 



HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE PUTNAM PHALANX. 341 



of the day. The colored porters v.ho 
were detailed to carry water, were 
treacherously inclined to sell it for 
the small sum of 5 cents per glass, so 
that before the pails reached the 
sweltering guardsmen there was lit- 
tle water in their interior. The 
porters registered solemn oaths that 
the pails were leaky, but the jingling 
nickels and dimes in their pockets 



''War Governor" of Connecticut, was 
inaugurated at New Haven in May, 
1862, and at the attending cere- 
monies the Phalanx was present. Be- 
fore leaving for the Elm City, the 
command was presented with a beau- 
tiful banner by the "Ladies' Putnam 
Phalanx Association," composed of 
the wives and lady friends of the 
members. 




" DOWN IN DIXIE." 



told a different story to the thirsty 
ones. 

October 5th, 1861, the eloquent 
Judge Advocate of the Phalanx, 
Isaac W. Stuart, was enrolled among 
the silent Battalions. His loss was 
keenly felt by the corps who recog- 
nized and appreciated his worth. At 
a special meeting called for the pur- 
pose suitable resolutions were adopt- 
ed and a fitting tribute to their de- 
ceased comrade was placed on the 
records of the command. 

Governor Buckingham, the famous 



May 14th, 1864, Major Horace 
Goodwin, first commandant of the 
Phalanx, passed away. The Phalanx 
attended the funeral in a body and 
at a special meeting drew up the 
usual resolutions, in memoriam. The 
years of '65 and '66 do not seem to 
have been prolific with much excite- 
ment for the command, for the only 
events recorded are an excursion to 
Worcester, Mass., as guests of the 
State Guard, and a target shoot at 
Waterbury. 

October 15th, 1867, was a notable 



342 HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE PUTNAM PHALANX. 




MAJOR HENRY BICKFORD. 

Elected Feb. 22, 1896. 

day in the history of the Phalanx, for 
on that day they entertained as their 
guests the members of the Amos- 
keag Veterans of Manchester, N. H., 
and the Providence Light Infantry 
of Providence, R. I. The arrange- 
ments made for the entertainment of 
these guests were very elaborate and 
included a banquet at which the Gov- 
ernor, Mayor and many prominent 
citizens were present and delivered 
addresses. The whole entertainment 
concluded with a promenade, con- 
cert and ball. This was the first of a 
series of visits exchanged between the 
three commands. 

October 7th, 1868, a visit was paid 
to Northampton, Mass., while still a 
year from that date they extended the 
field of their journeyings and travel- 
ed to Niagara Falls, accompanied by 
a large number of ladies and guests. 
On the evening of Wednesday, May 
4, 1870, the 'Tuts" took a hand in 
politics and joined in an election 
parade at New Haven, while on the 
20th of September of the same year 



they added materially to their reputa- 
tion as hosts by entertaining as their 
guests, the Worcester (Mass.) State 
Guard. • In September 1871, a five 
days' pilgrimage was made to Mon- 
treal, Rutland and BurHngton. This 
was said to have been the first armed 
invasion of an armed military corps 
from the United States to the Moth- 
er Country's Dommion, in its his- 
tory. At Montreal the Battalion re- 
ceived a most cordial welcome from 
the Mayor, Military companies and 
citizens, although the Continental 
uniforms of the invaders was a con- 
stant reminder that their owners 
came from the land conquered by the 
rebels. At Rutland and Burlington 
also the Phalanx was cordially re- 
ceived and different organizations, 
both military and civic, vied with 
themselves in making the stay there 
a most pleasant one. In August '72, 
the "Puts" paid a visit to Rocky 
Point at Providence, where all the 
delights of an old fashioned clam- 
bake were enjoyed. In September of 
the same year another excursion was 
indulged in to Newburyport and 
Portland, Maine. In July 1873, with 
fond remembrances of the clam-bake 
at Rocky Point, still in their hearts, 
the Phalanx paid another visit to 
that place and again tasted the de- 
lights of the juicy but elusive bi- 
valves. 

One of the few dark pages in Pha- 
lanx history is recorded with evident 
regret by the historian, when he 
states that on October 13th, 1873, E. 
B. Strong, one of the earliest and 
most active members of the com- 
mand, and for a long time an efficient 
Quartermaster, became somewhat 
involved in his financial accounts and 
failing to meet the executive com- 
mittee in an effort looking toward 
the adjustment of the same, was ex- 
pelled from the Battalion, "for un- 
gentlemanly and unsoldierlike con- 
duct." 

On election day in 1874, the Bat- 
talion paid a second visit to New Ha- 



HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE PUTNAM PHALANX. 343 



ven, this time as a guest of the New 
Haven Blues, whom they escorted in 
the inaugural parade, being reviewed 
by the Governor and his staff. 

May 17th, 1874, the statue of Israel 
Putnam on Bushnell Park was dedi- 
cated and the Phalanx took an active 
part in the ceremonies. This statue 
was made possible by a bequest in 
the will of Joseph Pratt Allyn, a son 
of ex-Mayor Timothy M. Allyn. In 
the evening the ceremonies were 
brought to a fitting close with a ban- 
quet provided by the Ladies' Pha- 
lanx Association before mentioned. 

In this year the Puts decided to 
make up for lost time in the line of 
excursions, for on the 14th of Octo- 
ber they gave one to Willimantic, 
where a target shoot was the princi- 
pal feature of the day. The company 
was met at the depot by Captain 
Cranston and his company, who es- 
corted them to the grounds provided 
for their use. Before being allowed 
to use the grounds, the major of the 
Phalanx was obliged to give his sol- 
emn promise that the safety of the 
citizens of the Thread City would be 
looked after at the shoot and that 
all who were damaged by stray bul- 
lets would be looked after at the ex- 
pense of the marksmen. After the 
shoot the visitors were entertained at 
the principal hotel in the city with a 
banquet, after which there was a pa- 
rade through the principal streets. 

The battle of Concord was cele- 
brated on the 18th of April 1875 and 
the Phalanx among other organiza- 
tions were invited to participate. 
Acting upon this invitation, they 
started for that place on the 16th, 
stopping for supper at Providence 
and remaining over night at Mans- 
field, going to Concord on the fol- 
lowing morning. After the celebration 
the command left for home after en- 
joying a dinner provided for them at 
Horticultural Hall. On the return 
trip they again stopped over at Prov- 
idence as the guests of their old 
friends, the Veteran Light Infantry. 




MAJOR J. N. SHEDD. 
Elected Feb. 22, 1898. 

This excursion proved fatal for one 
of the oldest and most respected 
members of the Battalion, Horace 
Ensworth, the Adjutant, who was 
taken ill upon his return home. He 
never recovered and on the 24th of 
the following May, was laid away with 
all the honors due to a faithful and 
zealous soldier. 

The Phalanx seems to have al- 
ways had a leaning toward Provi- 
dence, for on the 16th of June, 1875, 
it started on another pilgrimage 
toward the Rhode Island city on the 
way to assist in the ceremonies ac- 
companying the celebration of the 
Battle of Bunker Hill, which occur- 
red on the 17th. In the parade which 
was the principal feature of the day, 
none of the military companies at- 
tracted more attention or received 
more applause, than did the Hartford 
company. On October 5th of the 
same year another target shoot was 
held, this time at New Britain, in 
pursuance of an order issued by 
Major Kennedy. So few of the mem- 
bers were present on this occasion 
that the Major himself refused to ac- 



344 HISTORICAL SKETCH OF THE PUTNAM PHALANX. 



company his command, and as an 
aftermath of the event resigned Octo- 
ber 27th with the request that his 
name be stricken from the hst of 
members. December 1st, 1875, Free- 
man M. Brown was elected Major to 
fill the vacancy. 

Early in the year of 1876, a third 



and escorted from the railway sta- 
tion to their quarters on Market 
street, between 12th and 13th streets, 
at the Bingham House. On the